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  1. #326
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    I know what you mean about tones and pronouncing Poh. Poh is what my twins called their Chinese grandmother..
    Really? Grandmother, isn't it 'ar-mah'??

  2. #327
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    Nope, Southern Chinese dialect. A variation of Cantonese. Grandma was Thai but full Chinese.

  3. #328
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    The King also introduced mystery and detective stories to the Thai reading public. He translated Agatha Christie's Hercule Poirot novels into Thai and created his own original character "Nai Tong-In" (Mr. Tong-In) as Siam's first consulting detective, using Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes as a model.
    Brilliant.

    An amazing story, thank you

  4. #329
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    Yes, amazing story and fascinating dialog after. Just love this thread!

  5. #330
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    I am definitely sure that my explanation will confuse you. It would be better if we talk face to face. Writing cannot explain the sound of how we speak. Just hearing me speak the word 'Poh' and you will understand immediately.
    Thanks for the explanation. It has not confused me much, being used to that when explained e.g the difference between maa (dog) and maa (horse), do you hear the difference?

    The name calling in Thailand is sometimes not so easy to understand by falangs, however, never confusing for Thais. How to address certain person correctly and politely as it belongs to his rank, different titles when addressed by different people. That could be a special thread graciously authored by you...

  6. #331
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Nope, Southern Chinese dialect. A variation of Cantonese. Grandma was Thai but full Chinese.
    Got it!

  7. #332
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    To K. panama hat and K. CalEden .... Memory Lane (In my own language)-jpg

    It took me many hours to finish this article (compiling from many sources (mostly Thai's; for accuracy), editing, simplifying, searching for relevant photos and etc.). I really appreciate your kind compliment.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 02-11-2020 at 05:57 PM.

  8. #333
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    Thanks for the explanation. It has not confused me much, being used to that when explained e.g the difference between maa (dog) and maa (horse), do you hear the difference?

    The name calling in Thailand is sometimes not so easy to understand by falangs, however, never confusing for Thais. How to address certain person correctly and politely as it belongs to his rank, different titles when addressed by different people. That could be a special thread graciously authored by you...
    Yes, and you might include maa (one way of calling mother) maa (one way of calling grandmother) maa (come)

    Thai language has a lot forms of vowel and something called "wanna yuk" that help words/names being called mean differently when raising or lowering voices.

    'maa' is an example. My nickname is Nong. If in English, no matter how you raise your voice up or lower you voice down, it is the same. But in Thai language, it has to be only this level of voice that means exactly my nickname. I bet none of you can read mine right!

    Thank you so much for your kind compliment.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 02-11-2020 at 04:37 PM.

  9. #334
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    I’ve found a website that contains a collection of old B&W photographs shown in computer colored version. They are looked great. I will select and post them here from time to time. Hope you like them.

    Wat Niwet Tummaprawat; Bang Pa-In; Ayuthaya Province shot by King Rama V himself

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a01-jpg


    King Rama V on his Royal Sedan coming out of the Grand Palace’s main door heading to perform Consecrated Water Ceremony (Actually I have no idea about this term. Google just gave me this. You guys get it?) at Wat Pra Kaew

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a02-jpg


    Studio photo of a noble family (His rank was major general. He later had adopted a boy from a commoner family. This boy later became one of the most powerful persons in Siam known as Field Marshal Plaek Piboonsongkram or 'Poh")

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a03-jpg


    Cousin of King Rama V named known in public as ‘Krom Praya Dumrong Racha Nupab’. His role was very important in Siam as chief of the Privy Council to 2 reigns; King Rama V – VI and a senior counselor to King Rama VII. He was named ‘Father of Thai History and Archeology’. In 1962, UNESCO included Prince Dumrong on its World's Most Important Persons list, making him the first Thai to receive this accolade.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a04-jpg


    No description, just beautiful…

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a05-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 02-11-2020 at 06:08 PM.

  10. #335
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    Once upon a time, Siam used to own 4 submarines; 2 of them shown here. They were made in Japan and served our land from 1938-1951

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-18-sub00-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-18-sub01-jpg


    Once upon a time, Siam used to build airplanes:
    Aircraft Factory, Department of Aircraft, Bangkok 1922
    courtesy of Arlanda Civil Aviation Collection, Sweden

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00-jpg


    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-jpg  

  11. #336
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    I'm not sure about the year. They said in the 50s. I say older than that.

    Victory Monument, Bangkok; Paholyotin Road

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00-50s-jpg


    Victory Monument, Bangkok; Racha Witee Road

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00-jpg



  12. #337
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    Daily attire of people in the reign of King Rama V (1868-1910)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-09attire-jpg


    Bumroong Muang Road heading to the Giant Swing on the new location, in front of Wat Sutat. Shot in the reign of King Rama VI (1910-1925), back then we still used the "white elephant" flag.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-10-jpg

  13. #338
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    An official meeting between King Rama IX of Thailand and Chiang Kai-shek, Former President of the Republic of China (Taiwan) in 1963

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-11-meeting-rama-ix-jpg


    King Ananda Mahidol (Rama VIII) looking at a panto-graph during his royal visit at Kasetsart University on June 9, 1946; only 4 days before his untimely death at the age of 20.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-14-ananda-jpg

  14. #339
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    Somewhere on Satorn Road in 1936

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-15-house-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-17-satorn-road-jpg

  15. #340
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Nope, Southern Chinese dialect. A variation of Cantonese. Grandma was Thai but full Chinese.
    Yes, in Cantonese "Poh poh" specifically means your maternal grandmother.

    I believe it is the same written character as the term"Ah Poh", an informal but polite term for any old lady. You can hear it often in Hong Kong.

    Cantonese being the awkward language that it is, those two "poh" are the same character but with different tones when paired together, the first falling and the second rising.

  16. #341
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    Cantonese being the awkward language that it is, those two "poh" are the same character but with different tones when paired together, the first falling and the second rising.[/QUOTE]

    Reminds me of an instant noodles brand named "MAMA". Generally to us, the first tone (falling) means "mother" and the second tone (rising) means "grandmother".

    When I was young around my area were Teochew Chinese, so I have got used to this dialect.

    Blame it on the people who tried to build the Tower of Babel.

  17. #342
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    Paladkik in brief

    Paladkik is a kind of Thai amulet shaped like a penis. The term "paladkik" means "honorable surrogate penis". These amulets range from a few inches to several feet long in length. The smaller versions are usually worn on the body while the larger versions are displayed in shops and other establishments.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-kik000-jpg


    Paladkik is originated in India and related to the Hindu god Shiva who is usually represented by Shiva Linga. They were brought to Southeast Asia via a tribe called Cham and remained in the region ever since.

    Paladkik, as a phallic representation of Shiva, is also an animistic symbol of fertility. It is common in Thailand to see a penis amulet hanging in a convenience store or a restaurant, or even being sold by old women on the street.

    Although outsiders may regard these as offensive, Thai people are deeply superstitious. Lucky charms and talismans are still regarded as important.

    Paladkik can be made from wood, metal, bone, horn or ivory. They are mostly created by necromancers or even monks who specialize in this kind of magic. Engraving the sacred inscriptions is an important ritual. The process can take many days to complete.

    Paladkik amulets must be empowered by the repetition of incantations, which Thai people call 'Kata Bucha'. The incantations depend on the creator's lineage in each school of traditional non-Buddhist animist magic.

    Paladkiks are usually worn by males on a cord around their waists under the clothes and off-center from the real penis. It is not unusual for a male to wear many paladkiks at the same time, in the hope to attract women, increase gambling luck and protection from dangerous objects such as bullets and knives.

    However, women could carry it in their purses to protect them from rape and mugging. Shop owners display them in their shops or in the cash register area to protect their business and also bring good luck and sales.

    A notable feature of this type of amulet is it can be worn in places considered as lowly or unclean such as bars, gambling casinos and brothels where, normally, you cannot bring a general sacred amulet inside such establishments.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-kik000-00-jpg


    In Hindu beliefs, Shiva Linga (shown as male genitalia) is commonly accompanied by Yoni (female genitalia) which is referred to genitalia of the goddess Shakti and is conceptualized as nature's gateway of all births.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-kik001-jpg


    Together, they symbolize the merging of the divine eternal process of creation and regeneration, and the union of the feminine and the masculine that creates all of existence.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-kik002-jpg


    The yoni with linga iconography is found in Shiva temples and archaeological sites of the India subcontinent and Southeast Asia.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 04-11-2020 at 09:36 AM.

  18. #343
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    I had wondered about the paladkik but never got as far as learning more, so this was very interesting.

  19. #344
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    ^These kinds of amulets in form of large sculptures are widely exhibited in wats and sacred caves in South at sea side. I thinks I saw something like this at Krabi.

    (Nong, I take the liberty, humbly again, to remark something in "your" thread, being again strongly scolded by my friendly stalker who does not approved that I dare...)

  20. #345
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    ^These kinds of amulets in form of large sculptures are widely exhibited in wats and sacred caves in South at sea side. I thinks I saw something like this at Krabi.

    (Nong, I take the liberty, humbly again, to remark something in "your" thread, being again strongly scolded by my friendly stalker who does not approved that I dare...)
    Don't worry. This is a friendly thread. You can talk, remark, anything (compliment even better!) only please be respectful.

    About paladkik, in the old days, they were a lot of shrines here and there around Thailand being set up to worship paladkiks. Now many of them have been demolished by the officials on the grounds that they brought humiliation to our civilization.

    This is at Pra-Nang Bay in Krabi

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-005-jpg


    Somewhere on the border between Chieng Mai - Chieng Rai

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00border-chgmai-rai-jpg


    In Sataheeb, Chonburi

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00sataheeb-jpg


    And at Park Nai Rerd, Bangkok. I don't know when this photo was taken.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00park-nai-lerd-jpg


    Last edited by nathanielnong; 05-11-2020 at 03:10 PM.

  21. #346
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    Klong San-Sab, Meanburi, Bangkok (1937)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-16-klong-san00-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-16-klong-san01-jpg


    Floating rowboat selling fresh cut pork. The pieces were wrapped up in banana leaf seen on the floor (1947)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-16-pork-shop-jpg


    "Mass transportation"

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-01-jpg

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 05-11-2020 at 03:18 PM.

  22. #347
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    In the 50s-60s, there were various brands of washing powder but the name “FAB” took over the market in Thailand. It was so popular that we used the name “FAB” instead of the term “washing powder” and everyone understood what we meant.

    For example; we went to a grocery store to buy one.

    “What do you want?”

    Instead of saying “a box of washing powder named BREEZE”, we said

    “I want a box of FAB named BREEZE”

    The seller nodded and brought a box of washing powder named BREEZE for us.

    or...

    "Nong, go buy a new brand name of FAB named RINZO. I want to try"



    Memory Lane (In my own language)-08-50fab-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 05-11-2020 at 03:37 PM.

  23. #348
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Really? Grandmother, isn't it 'ar-mah'??
    From my time in Singapore, Amah would be applied to someone who helped a household to raise children. "Grandmother" would be a respectful, non-literal translation, but more akin to a concept of "nanny".

  24. #349
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    From my time in Singapore, Amah would be applied to someone who helped a household to raise children. "Grandmother" would be a respectful, non-literal translation, but more akin to a concept of "nanny".

    阿媽, amah, is commonly used in HK and Singapore as the word for a maid. I don't know about other places and dialects.

    In Chinese generally the same words can be used for 'mum' and 'grandma'. I suppose it relies upon context. Versatile words.

  25. #350
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    From my time in Singapore, Amah would be applied to someone who helped a household to raise children.
    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    but more akin to a concept of "nanny".
    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    Singapore as the word for a maid.
    Yea, living in Malaysia and having lived i SG I'd tend to agree with nid. Kak is what a maid is called, amah more of a higher level person

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