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  1. #351
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Yea, living in Malaysia and having lived i SG I'd tend to agree with nid. Kak is what a maid is called, amah more of a higher level person
    Same goes in Thailand. For example we call elder women "na" or "pa" even though they are not any relatives of ours. We are taught to respect and one way to show that is to elevate them equally to our elder relatives. It is eastern tradition, I might say.

    Reminds me of something. When I was young, we were taught that youngsters can’t touch elders from shoulders up. For example, I can’t put my arm around my mum’s shoulders. We were told that it was disrespectful. It is bad manner for Thai tradition. I hugging or holding mum is okay.







  2. #352
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    Pra Samut Chedee is a remarkably white pagoda built in the area of a Wat that shares the same name. The place is located on a small island that almost 200 years ago was in the middle of the Chao Praya River.

    The island was partly natural caused by the accumulation of sand brought down by the flood waters. Over the years the river has silted up even more causing the island to become part of the west bank.

    Because originally it was on an island hence it has another name Pra Chedee Klang Nam ('pagoda in the middle of the water') which is a more popular name than the official name.

    King Putta Lerdla Napalai (King Rama II) was the first to have the idea of a temple in the middle of the river. He noticed a natural sandbank in the river at Paknam, Samut Prakarn Province and thought it would make the ideal location for a temple.

    However, he died before his dream could materialize. The task, then, was taken over by his son, King Nung Klao (King Rama III) who started work on October 1827 and was completed seven months later at the cost of 1,864 baht. Inside the top of the Chedee, King Nung Klao put 4 Buddha’s relics but not long after, they were stolen.

    The Chedee was improved some 30 years later by King Mongkut (King Rama IV), King Rama III’s brother. He renovated the Chedee by covering the old one with a new and much higher one. He also brought 12 Buddha’s relics from the Royal Grand Palace in Bangkok and put them inside the top of the Chedee expecting that with this much new height, it was quite difficult for thieves to climb up to steal them.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-jpg


    Further down to the mouth of the Chao Phraya River is The Chulachomklao Fort, built in 1819 and came into use only once during the Paknam crisis in the same year. Close by is The HTMS Maeklong, the oldest ship of the Royal Thai Navy, another attraction in the park.

    https://mgronline.com/travel/detail/9620000040474
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 06-11-2020 at 09:43 AM.

  3. #353
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    Khuk (= jail) Kee (= shit) Kai (= chicken)

    Khuk Kee Kai (chicken shit jail), located near Tuek Daeng or the Red Building at Tambon Pak Nam Laem Sing, Chanthaburi province, was built in 1893 (the reign of King Rama V) when France were occupying Chanthaburi on the dispute of the land on the left side of the Mekong River.

    During that time, the French military of approximately 600 soldiers was split into two camps; the first one was in Chanthaburi where currently is a military campsite. The other one was at the Laem Sing Estuary.

    The French built the jail to capture those Thais who resisted the French troops. It is a square tower with a measurement of 4.4 metres wide on each side and 7 metres high, having two rows of air vents and a high rooftop.

    This jail was so torturous because on the upper level was a chicken coop, set up by the French, where the chickens would continuously dump their droppings on the prisoners captured inside.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-03-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-04-jpg



    Last edited by nathanielnong; 06-11-2020 at 10:01 AM.

  4. #354
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    A Meerschaum pipe is a smoking pipe made from the mineral called sepiolite, also known as meerschaum (German for "sea foam"). It is sometimes found floating on the Black Sea and is rather suggestive of sea foam (hence the German origin of the name).

    This type of pipes was very popular during the reigns of King Rama IV – VI.

    Shown are from the collection of King Rama V’s.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-12-jpg

  5. #355
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    Two daguerreotypes (photographs taken by an early photographic process employing an iodine-sensitized silvered plate and mercury vapor) shot by a Siamese lord sent to Queen Victoria of England in 1857; details as described in the photo.

    Note: More information said that copies of the first one were also sent to President Franklin Pierce (14th president of America), Pope Pius IX and Napoleon III of France.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-daguer00-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-daguer01-jpg

  6. #356
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    In the 50s-60s, there were various brands of washing powder but the name “FAB” took over the market in Thailand. It was so popular that we used the name “FAB” instead of the term “washing powder” and everyone understood what we meant.


    I noticed the Thai spelling for 'clean' in the advert. Was it a mistake or was the spelling different in those days? (สอาด v สะอาด)

  7. #357
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    I noticed the Thai spelling for 'clean' in the advert. Was it a mistake or was the spelling different in those days? (สอาด v สะอาด)

    First, let me admire your being so thorough! Yes, the right word written as สะอาด. I only noticed the word; แฟ๊บ of which the right spelling is แฟ้บ, but did not think much of it.

    It made me remember that during Field Marshal “Poh” was at his top, in 1942, he reformed the system of Thai alphabet, under the slogan “Simple is the best”, almost totally and the word “สะอาด – สอาด” was included but it stayed for only 2 years and some months or until he stepped down from his position then all went back to normal.

    Well, I can’t find the answer myself so I talked to my teacher who is a professor in Thai language. She said that until 60s-70s, the Royal Society of Thailand which is known for its role in the planning and regulation of the Thai language had not been effective especially to be strict about the word spelling yet.

    I still have the revised Thai dictionary issued during the Thai language reformation in the 40s which belonged to my grandpa’s. Gathering that you can speak/read/write Thai language, if interested, I can show you sample of some pages. They (the word spelling) look totally weird. No wonder, the public did not accept this change.

    Thanks for your remark.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 09-11-2020 at 08:59 AM.

  8. #358
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    Photography made its journey into Siam in the reign of King Mongkut (Rama IV; 1851-1868). Back then it was very less known to public.

    The popularity increased with time and became wider known in the reign of King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) and rapidly onward.

    Though very popular but, at the same time, it was very expensive. At first, only people in the Royal family could enjoy. Later on, the cost became less expensive, yet still expensive, and more people could enjoy; noble ranking families, rich families and etc. These were people from high class society which we call them in Thai as "hi-so people".

    Because such new thing was rare and expensive, once paid for it, they all wanted the best outcome. To make the best outcome, they had to look best in front of the camera.

    Historians seem to enjoy the anonymous models posed in these photos which were taken over 100 years ago. It is fun to check, not only how fashionable their costumes were but also, ornaments such as various kinds of sashes, jewelries, pendants, badges and etc. and try to tell who they were, how noble, how rich and etc. they were in the high society.

    These are some of them:


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port00-jpg
    (
    These two couples are different in status. While the ones on the right are definitely husband and wife, the ones on the left were mother and son)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port01-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port02-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port03-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port04-jpg
    (You already know this lady on the left...)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port05-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port06-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port09-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port08-jpg


    Last edited by nathanielnong; 09-11-2020 at 09:21 AM.

  9. #359
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    Though the photos are black and white, I think I see some of the people as having darker skin. Are the stigmatisms of today regarding skin tone relatively new? Or have they existed for a long time in Thai society?

  10. #360
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    Though the photos are black and white, I think I see some of the people as having darker skin. Are the stigmatisms of today regarding skin tone relatively new? Or have they existed for a long time in Thai society?

    I’m not an expert but an idea in my mind about this question goes to the quality of the photography development in those times that had not reached international standard enough.

    Moreover, I think it concerns with the negative films, which at that time was new, were made to take photographs of Caucasian, whose complexion was/is lighter than Asian, to come out “perfect”. When they were used to take photographs of Asian whose complexion was/is not that light, the outcomes made them darker than usual.

    However, I might be wrong.

    More comments?
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 09-11-2020 at 03:38 PM.

  11. #361
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    More comments?
    I believe the idea of lighter skin being 'better' came with the Chinese as they rose in the society's hierarchy.
    Dark skin = rural worker. Lighter skin = no need to work, wealthier

  12. #362
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post


    Historians seem to enjoy the anonymous models posed in these photos
    These are some of them:



    Memory Lane (In my own language)-port01-jpg

    I think that the photo on the right is not of an anonymous model but of King Rama VI with one of his wives you listed here recently, perhaps the first one, seeing the king in his younger age...

  13. #363
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    I think that the photo on the right is not of an anonymous model but of King Rama VI with one of his wives you listed here recently, perhaps the first one, seeing the king in his younger age...

    Actually, almost all of the said anonymous models on the photos I have posted here have been identified by the historians. I did not reveal them because it would be irrelevant to my theme of the article.

    About the couple that you remarked, the husband was King Rama V’s 5th son (of all 8) born with his Supreme Royal Consort, Queen Sri Pacharintra. His name was Prince Assadang Dechawut (1889-1925 --- He was in the line of the succession to the throne but died young).

    His elder brother was King Rama VI (you can see his resemblance, very good!) and his younger brother was King Rama VII (your favorite!).

    Your remark shows that you really are interested in Thai history, very impressed.

    (Note: The photo of the sitting single lady I said 'you know who' is King Rama VI's wife (#3))


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-03-jpg
    (The standing handsome Prince, in the middle, has his interesting story. Working on it!)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-jpg

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 10-11-2020 at 03:31 PM.

  14. #364
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    I believe the idea of lighter skin being 'better' came with the Chinese as they rose in the society's hierarchy.
    Dark skin = rural worker. Lighter skin = no need to work, wealthier
    Perhaps the Chinese had some influence on this particular social scheme, but greater evidence suggest that this lighter/darker skin complex had it's origins from King Chulalongkorn and court circles, during his mid-years reign of romancing the "siwilai" Farang manner - including the fashion of lighter skin tone. Quite remarkable, was the fashionable transition of dress, hair, customs and styles of demeanor within the broader circles. Naturally, these trends transferred easily to general society......the base ideals of fairer skin being civilised and whatnot.

  15. #365
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Your remark shows that you really are interested in Thai history, very impressed.
    Thanks for the flowers (a bit compensating for the outraged private "appreciations" of some honourable members for my humble contributions to "your" thread - they are too shy to publicise them).
    Actually, not really much in-deep knowledgable, just interested in history of country I currently live in.

    In fact, some of bits of Thai history (beside books reading) I had gotten many years ago while being member of Siam Society for few years, having a chance to meet and hear many interesting people there - both falangs and Thai (now again I see how I was wrong when uttering that haven't met Thai people interesting in their history - actually that was valid for Thai working class even with a high education) and having a free access to their extensive library. I discontinued the membership when later not staying permanently in Bangkok, no longer being able to attend the regular meetups on Wednesdays at Asoke Rd. Mansion.

    As of the handsome prince shown above, you are now preparing something about, isn't he Prince Chakrabongse? His life (and death as well) could constitute surely a lot of interesting stories...

  16. #366
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    Thanks for the flowers (a bit compensating for the outraged private "appreciations" of some honourable members for my humble contributions to "your" thread - they are too shy to publicise them).
    Actually, not really much in-deep knowledgable, just interested in history of country I currently live in.

    In fact, some of bits of Thai history (beside books reading) I had gotten many years ago while being member of Siam Society for few years, having a chance to meet and hear many interesting people there - both falangs and Thai (now again I see how I was wrong when uttering that haven't met Thai people interesting in their history - actually that was valid for Thai working class even with a high education) and having a free access to their extensive library. I discontinued the membership when later not staying permanently in Bangkok, no longer being able to attend the regular meetups on Wednesdays at Asoke Rd. Mansion.

    As of the handsome prince shown above, you are now preparing something about, isn't he Prince Chakrabongse? His life (and death as well) could constitute surely a lot of interesting stories...
    Thanks for sharing your interesting life (while in Bangkok). Are you Buddhist or just interested in Thai history?

    I used to meet a young Swedish at a wat in Rayong. He came here to ordain to become a monk. It was only him that was deeply interested in Buddhism. His family are not Buddhism. I asked if his parents agreed with this. He said "I've chosen my life". I provided him Buddhism in English for him to study. On that day, his parents flew in to witness their son.

    No one knows what lies in the future.

    He is now still there, 10 years already. I used to come to visit him a few times but never be able to meet. He was seclusive. I really admire his determination. He first flew here alone, at late 20s and, kind of, being able to speak only few Thai words, and found a way to come to this wat and has never left.

    And yes, that was Prince Chakrapong (my way of writing names, according to how we pronounce) I am working on.


    Last edited by nathanielnong; 11-11-2020 at 10:02 AM.

  17. #367
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    Petchara Chaowarat is an icon of the "Golden Age" of Thai cinema who starred in around 300 films from 1961 to 1979. She was known for her round, pool-like eyes and elaborating hairstyles.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-petchara00-jpg


    Born in 1943 in Rayong Province, she moved into Bangkok at the age of 15. In 1961, she competed for Miss Hawaiian April pageant and won the title.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-petchara00-01-jpg


    That paved her way into the entertainment world which she proved to be very good at. She co-starred with popular leading man, Mit Chaibancha, and the most popular pair in the entertainment world of the era was born. In that time, none just said “Mit” or “Petchara” but “Mit-Petchara”. Both starred together in more than 150 films.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-petchara01-jpg


    In 1964, Petchara was named best actress by the Thailand National Film Awards committee for her role in Nok Noi (the name of her role which means ‘little bird’) and received the award from King Rama IX.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-petchara02-jpg


    Her last film was Ai Khuntong, which was released in 1979.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-petchara03-jpg


    Her public appearances have dwindled over the years attributed to her near blindness then finally went blind caused from her many hours of working in front of the bright lights on film sets.

    Petchara was named a National Artist of Thailand in 2018.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-petchara04-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 11-11-2020 at 10:07 AM.

  18. #368
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    Computer colored versions of B&W photographs

    The Siamese from Lopburi Province were gathered around to witness and offer food to their beloved King Rama V (1905)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a01-jpg


    Andreas du Plessis de Richelieu (1852 – 1932) was a Danish with French descendant naval officer and businessman.

    He commanded forces at the Pra Chulachomklao Fortress in the Paknam Incident of 13 July 1893 that ended the Franco-Siamese War and went on to become the first and only foreign-born commander-in-chief of the Royal Thai Navy, ranking Vice Admiral, from 16 January 1900 to 29 January 1901 in the reign of King Rama V.
    He was granted the Thai noble title “Phraya Chonlayuttayotin”.

    He returned to Denmark in 1902, suffering from malaria and died in Copenhagen.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a02-jpg


    One of King Rama V’s concubines

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a03-jpg


    The uniform of court chamberlain in the reign of King Rama VI (1910-1925)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a04-jpg


    King Rama VII’s wife, Queen Rampai Pannee (1904-1984) when being young

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a05-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 12-11-2020 at 03:17 PM.

  19. #369
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    Mit Chaibancha was the legendary Thai film actor who made 266 films from 1956 to 1970.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit00-jpg


    Born in 1934 from a poor family in Petchaburi Province, at the age of 8, Mit moved to Bangkok where he was enrolled in a Thai boxing school. He became the lightweight boxing champion for his school in 1949 and 1951 then went on to win three lightweight division titles.

    After finishing secondary school, he studied at a community college before being accepted into the Royal Thai Air Force aviation school where he was trained as a pilot.

    After graduation, he worked as a flight instructor at Don Muang Royal Thai Air Force Base. Shortly after that, his handsomeness and manly look drew him into the entertainment world.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit01-jpg


    One of his best known movies, Pet Tad Pet (Operation Bangkok) released in 1966, was shot in both Bangkok and Hong Kong. The film starred a lot of famous Thai actors/actresses at that time and featured Hong Kong's then top actress, Regina Piping. The result was a blockbuster. It earned more than 3 million baht within 1 month.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit05-jpg


    Back in 1961, Mit starred in a film titled “Bantuk Rak Pimchawee (Love Diary of Pimchawee)”.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit02-jpg


    It was his first film being paired with Petchara Chaowarat. This was the beginning of the most celebrated hero-heroine partnership in Thai cinematic history. The Mit-Petchara duo made about 165 films together.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit03-jpg


    One of the pair's most famous films was 1970's Mon Rak Loog Tung (roughly means in English as “Magical Love of the Countryside”), a musical romantic comedy rhapsodizing Thai rural life.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit04-jpg


    At the height of his career in the 60s up to early 70s, Mit, along with Petchara Chaowarat, made a string of hit films that packed cinemas all over Thailand, starting from north to south and east to west. No one did not know them.

    "Mon Rak Loog Tung” was one of Mit's last films. It played in Bangkok cinemas for a solid six months in 1970 and took in 6 million baht and 13 million all over Thailand which considered a phenomenon. Its popularity spurred by the best-selling soundtrack album.

    Mit met his death untimely in October 1970 while filming “Insee Tong” (Golden Eagle).

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit06-jpg


    Insee Tong was the first film that Mit produced himself and it featured the return of his popular character, the masked crime-fighter, “Insee Daeng” (Red Eagle), the secret alter ego of alcoholic detective Rom Rittikrai of which the first of the series was released in 1959.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit07-jpg


    On the last day of shooting “Insee Tong” at Dong Tan Beach, Pattaya, the script called for Mit, having vanquished the villains, to fly off into the sunset by a helicopter. As the camera rolled, Mit leapt from the ground to grab a rope ladder hanging from the aircraft only managing to reach the very last rung.

    Unaware of this, the helicopter pilot flew higher and higher. Mit finally lost his grip and fell to the ground.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit08-jpg


    The accident was all caught on film and was actually left in the final theatrical release. The fatal fall has since been removed from DVD version of the film with Mit simply flying off into the distance and some onscreen text paying tribute to the star.

    Mit's death was the headline of every newspaper in Thailand. The incident was ruled as a tragic accident. For safety, there should have been two takes for the final scene. The first would have been of Mit grabbing the ladder and flying off at low altitude. Then a stuntman would have performed a second shot at a higher altitude but that did not happen for Mit normally had never called for a stuntman.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit09-jpg


    Mit was a devoted actor to his career. He was extremely busy with his work and was always on the move, going from set to set and sleeping as little as two or three hours per night.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-mit10-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 13-11-2020 at 08:56 AM.

  20. #370
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    As the camera rolled, Mit leapt from the ground to grab a rope ladder hanging from the aircraft only managing to reach the very last rung.

    Unaware of this, the helicopter pilot flew higher and higher. Mit finally lost his grip and fell to the ground.
    Geez . . . and to have a picture of it as well.

  21. #371
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    I remember Mitr's death and the huge press coverage surrounding it. There was a shrine dedicated to his memory at Pattaya. I am guessing it is still there unless swallowed up by development. Maybe one of the Pattaya residents will know?

    Whenever I mention his name these days nobody knows who I am talking about, unless it is a fellow geriatric.

  22. #372
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    ^ You’ve been around a while! Are you Thai? In 1970, I wouldn’t have been able to point out Thailand on a map.

  23. #373
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Thanks for sharing your interesting life (while in Bangkok). Are you Buddhist or just interested in Thai history?
    Thanks for asking, not really a Buddhist nor belonging to any religion. However, when attending numerous tamboons with my wives, following the customary procedures...

  24. #374
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    ... with my wives ....
    Memory Lane (In my own language)-wow-jpg

  25. #375
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    May I introduce you to the our good old uncle giants named “Sahadsa-Daecha” and “Tosakan” who has been guarding the entrance to the main hall of Wat Aroon Rachawararam, or known locally as Wat Chaeng, since the reign of King Rama III (1824-1851). The roof of the entrance was built in ‘Thai crown’ style.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-00-jpg


    When you are in a wat. The corridor with roof that runs around the area inside of the wall is called “ra-beang (corridor) kot”. It’s usually a place to keep Buddha images collected from various times and places. This photo shows ra-beang kot at Wat Benchamaborpit.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-01-jpg


    In the old days, 50s-60s, the only bank that provided “moving bank” service is the Government Savings Bank. Blue with sky blue stripe, I remember very well.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-02-jpg


    Before cooking gas, every kitchen starting from the top (palaces’) to the bottom (people houses’) used hard wood charcoal as fuel to cook food.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-03-jpg


    Last edited by nathanielnong; 15-11-2020 at 02:24 PM.

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