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  1. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    Another very interesting observation. I was in Bangkok over 30 years ago and I cannot say that I really notice a huge difference in the weather between then and now. However, the gf grew up here in Isan and she insists that it gets hotter here now than it did 40 years ago. She says that when she was young temperatures in the 30s Centigrade were already high. She insists that they never saw teperatures touch 40 degrees back then, whereas now they do.
    I have never looked into the data to confirm her claims. Certainly she isn't the only one who talks about it being hotter and here, the locals being close to the land, I suspect they are correct.

    She is absolutely correct. Back when I was a boy in the 60s, I remember there was once we reached 31C and we thought that was the end of the world. Now, when we have 31C, we sing "jingle bells".


    Also in those days, winter showed up around the end of September and we held winter fair in October (called "Ngan Ka-chart (= red cross fair)). We all wore winter clothes and flirted in the fair, the later at night the more fun. Some year, the temperature went low to one digit, such as 9C, in Bangkok. Winter went on strongly through January and subsided in late February.

    We the children hardly had sweat when playing but it was kind of "shit" when bath-time came in the evening for we did not have warm water. Some days we had to boil water in a kettle to mix with cool water from the tap.

    Nowadays, the weather is so hot but we had electric water heater.

  2. #227
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    The OED says:

    cankle

    Pronunciation /ˈkaŋk(ə)l/



    noun

    informal A woman's fat or swollen ankle whose flesh merges unattractively with that of the calf.


    Origin

    Early 21st century blend of calf and ankle.





    Well, that was a new word to me. I'm not sure when I'll need it.
    I am a non English speaking person but I first knew this word from this clip (2:05):

    <font size="4">

  3. #228
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    Bang Pu is still very popular today. The seafood restaurant at the end of the pier is actually very nice. Everyone loves to feed the seagulls as well. Its a nice place to take a meal after visiting Min Boran which I also like very much.

  4. #229
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Bang Pu is still very popular today. The seafood restaurant at the end of the pier is actually very nice. Everyone loves to feed the seagulls as well. Its a nice place to take a meal after visiting Min Boran which I also like very much.
    Is that the same area where the pestles and mortars come from? Years ago I was taken somewhere in that direction and came away with this small but heavy souvenir. Special stone down that way, I was told.

  5. #230
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    visiting Min Boran which .

    If I may.

    If it was not a typo, this place is called "Muang (city) Boran (ancient)".

  6. #231
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    Is that the same area where the pestles and mortars come from? Years ago I was taken somewhere in that direction and came away with this small but heavy souvenir. Special stone down that way, I was told.

    No, that is "Ang Si-la" close to Bang Saen, Chonburi, another area that you can buy various kinds of seafood, fresh and dry and of course various sizes of motars and pestles.



    The area has been now modernized according to new era. Back when I was a boy, on the last day of our summer vacation at Bang Saen, this is the sure place that my family would stop, before heading straight back to Bangkok, to buy seafood back for keep. It was just a small fisherman's village that sold only dry seafood.

    ตลาดประมงพื้นบ้าน อ่างศิลา จ.ชลบุรี อาหารทะเลสด! ดี! ต้องที่นี่เลย


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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-jpeg

  7. #232
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    Robert Lenz was a German photographer. He set up his studio first in Burma in 1892. In 1894, he expanded a branch in Singapore. Here, King Chulalongkorn (Rama V) and his Queen on their royal visit to Singapore used to drop by to take photos. That made Robert decide to move to open a photo studio in Siam in 1896. His studio was sited in the corner of Charoen Krung and Tree Tong Roads. It was a little later than the Scottish photographer, John Thomson’s.

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    Last edited by nathanielnong; 23-09-2020 at 09:25 AM.

  8. #233
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    His studio was very popular among the Royalties and high societies until 10 years later, he sold his business to Emil Groote and Carl Pruss who used to work with him. The two later became the only German court photographers to serve three kings of Siam: King Chulalongkorn (King Rama V; 1868-1910), King Wachirawut (King Rama VI; 1910-1925 and King Prajadhipok (King Rama VII; reigned 1925-1935).

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    They ran the business until the WWI started in 1917 when the Siam government had seized the business because it was owned by German foreigners.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 23-09-2020 at 09:36 AM.

  9. #234
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    If it was not a typo, this place is called "Muang (city) Boran (ancient)".
    You are correct..

  10. #235
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    In Nonthaburi Province, there are a lot of bridges crossing the Chao Praya River joining the province to other provinces, Bangkok and Pratumtanee. Each bridge has a name but only one has two names. Its formal name is Nonthaburi Bridge. The construction started in 1954 and opened for public in 1959.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-000-jpg


    The bridge is also known better as Nuanchawee Bridge. Here is the story (in a nutshell):

    Nuanchawee Petchrung was a Government Tobacco Monopoly nurse. On 10 September 1959, she was murdered by her medical doctor husband, Dr. Athip Suyansethakarn, who worked at the Railways Hospital.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-005-jpg


    Athip dumped his dead wife into the Chao Praya River. Her dead body was later found floating in the river on the outskirts of Bangkok.

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    Witnesses testified that Athip had used chloroform to incapacitate her and had allowed another confidant to stab and rape her.

    The investigation and trial received sensational coverage in the media Siang Ang Thong newspaper, which later became the country's top circulating daily newspaper, Thai Rath. It gained popularity from its coverage of the case, which regularly filled the front page.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-002-jpg


    The case became one of the best known murders in Thailand because that was the first time a doctor conducted a murder even though the detail of the story showed what Nuanchawee had done deserved it!

    Athip, though maintained his innocence, was found guilty of premeditated murder and sentenced to death. The confidant was also convicted of the murder but because he was not the mastermind of the crime, he escaped the dead penalty and was sentenced to life in prison instead.

    However later on, Athep was released. He attempted to resume his career as a doctor but was not allowed to return to practicing medicine.

    Nonthaburi Bridge where her body was disposed into the Chao Praya River, hence, has another and more popular name known as Nuanchawee Bridge. The evidence from the case is on display at the Songkran Niyomsane Forensic Medicine Museum.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-004-jpg

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 25-09-2020 at 09:49 AM.

  11. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    the detail of the story showed what Nuanchawee had done deserved it!
    What could she possibly have done to deserve such a fate?

  12. #237
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    What could she possibly have done to deserve such a fate?

    Well, since the case happened long time ago so, not much detail but it goes briefly like this...

    While courting, Nuanchawee was so much possessive of Athip. She followed him everywhere and showed jealousy and some times acted out every time she saw Athip with another women.

    In order to stop being annoyed and to secure her confidence, Athip registered a marriage certificate with her but that didn't help. Her being persistent and possessive soon worn out their romance. Finally, Athip got involved with another woman and repeated another marriage certificate register.

    Then the two women confronted each other and things got uglier and uglier. Athip was compelled to do something.

    Anyway, that was just one-sided interrogation, Athip's. The other side couldn't speak anymore.

    I am not sure if the term "crime of passion" fits this case.

  13. #238
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    Ministry of Defence

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-jpg


    The Ministry of Defence is a historic building in Bangkok sited opposite the Grand Palace and close to Sanam Luang in the heart of the historic Ratanakosin Island.

    The building, in the neo-Palladian style of the neoclassical movement, being built as the Front Soldiers' Barracks in 1882–1884 was designed by an Italian architect Joachim Grassi. It has served as the headquarters of the Ministry of Defence since the ministry's establishment in 1887.

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    The site of the building used to be the location of three former princely palaces built in the reign of King Paputtayodfa Chulalok (King Rama I; 1782–1809). By the time of King Chulalongkorn (King Rama V; 1868–1910), those palaces had become disused and parts of the site were occupied by granaries, stables and silkworm-rearing houses.

    King Chulalongkorn worked extensively to modernize the country including replacing the system of Corvee labour (don't understand this term!) with a professional standing military. A regiment known as Thahan Na ("front soldiers"), consisting of about 4,400 men, was created in late 1870s to guard the capital.

    The need for a permanent residence for the force soon became apparent in the aftermath of a cholera outbreak during which many soldiers died. The regiment commander known as Chaopraya (noble rank granted by the King) Surasak Montri accordingly requested that a barracks be built so the construction took place on the site from 1882 to 1884.

    The building was inaugurated by King Chulalongkorn on 18 July 1884. With the formal establishment of the Ministry of Defence in 1887, the building became the ministry's headquarters, a role which it holds to the present.

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    Last edited by nathanielnong; 28-09-2020 at 09:14 AM.

  14. #239
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    Corvee labour is essentially forced (e.g ordered by a King or Lord), unpaid labour for a defined period of time.

  15. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    Corvee labour is essentially forced (e.g ordered by a King or Lord), unpaid labour for a defined period of time.
    Okay, now I got it. Thank you so much...

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-thank-you-jpg

  16. #241
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    Ancient Artillery Museum

    In the front lawns of the Ministry of Defence building, arranged in a garden display, are a large collection of bronze cannons. The display was initiated by King Wachirawut (King Rama VI, 1881–1925), who was probably inspired by his experience at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, England.

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    Sixty-three guns were once displayed on the lawn, according to a 1921 survey but many have been relocated and forty currently remain. Some of them have long history serving bravely as kings of the battlefields back in the Ayuthaya Kingdom (1350-1767).

    The display has been reorganized many times. In 2004, several guns were rotated to face the building, prompting rumors that the ministry was trying to avoid bad luck resulting from the guns pointing towards the Grand Palace.

    This was denied by the Ministry Permanent Secretary, who said that it was part of a re-landscaping project, done in accordance with a request from the Ministry of Tourism and Sports and advice from the Fine Arts Department, and also to mark the ministry's 120th anniversary.

    The display has been reorganized again, so that all the guns now point sideways. In 2014, the ministry inaugurated the exhibit as an outdoor museum, titled the "Ancient Artillery Museum", with information placards and scheduled guided tours.

    The most significant ones are such as

    “Paya Taanee”; the longest of all, 6.82 meters, built in the land of an independent territory in the south, Patanee, hence the name given, in the reign of King Paputtayodfa Chulalok (King Rama I; 1782–1809). The King defeated the ruler in 1786 and brought back the cannon. Originally there were 3 of them but another two were lost during the transportation along the river.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-jpg


    “Narai Sungharn” (= killing Narai); the biggest of all which measured 4.5 meters in length and 30 cm. on cannon barrel (the right term?) built by the order of King Paputtayodfa Chulalok. The end of the cannon was in the shape of a conch shell.

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    “Marn Pralai” (= satan defeated); the most beautiful one also built in the reign of King Paputtayodfa Chulalok

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    “Akranirut” (= the great fire); the oldest one built in Spain in 1624 used in the reign of the 21st King of the Kingdom of Ayuthaya

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    The garden also features two large gajasiha (kochasee = a mythical hybrid animal in Hindu mythology, appearing as a sinha or rajasiha with the head or trunk of an elephant) statues which are the symbols of the Ministry of Defence.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-09-jpg

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 30-09-2020 at 09:50 AM.

  17. #242
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    I am sad today. One of my all time favorite singers has died.

    When I was young, my favorite pastimes concerned about western stuff. I watched farang movies/tv (American/British) dubbed into Thai, I read farang stuff, translated versions, I listened to farang songs (American/British) and etc.

    Back then modern technology like this has not been born yet but I managed to find farang songs from my grandmother's transistor radio to listen to. I thought 'Wow, these songs sound beautiful!".

    There were tons of them that I liked. Those were from various singers. Until one day, the song "Delta Dawn" hit my ears and I thought 'Hey, I like her voice' and from then on, I tried to follow her work which was quite hard to find because she was not popular much in Thailand so, it was up to the kindness of those DJs.

    Anyway, back then western stuff hardly spread into Thailand in various kinds of media like nowadays that we have internet. Especially songs, we only heard their voices. We had never seen any clips or any movement of theirs. The closest that we could find was still photos of them which were not all (such as I have never known how "Leslie Gore" looked like until the internet was born).

    So, let's say that all those years, I saw Helen Reddy from only still photos from Thai magazines which were rare. I never knew how was her movement while speaking or singing on the stages.

    Helen Reddy inspired me to go out and search all the records stores which were not many in Bangkok to buy the my first album, "Long Hard Climb" (because I seldom heard her 'Delta Dawn' on the radio) and I 'did something good' so my dad bought me a small gramophone.

    After hearing a lot of her songs on more albums of hers, I was hooked on her voice so much that I decided to write to her. You all know by now that I am a Thai born in the country that doesn't communicate in English. Though we learned English in schools but those were fundamental lessons and up to 90% hated it (me included).

    Yet, at the age of 17, let alone writing a Thai letter, I held my breath and tried to compose an English letter... to Helen Reddy.

    I used her record label's address and after sending it out at the post office, I prayed that my letter would reach her and started counting days.

    From days turn into a week and from a week turns into a month and from a month turns into many months and finally, I forgot what I did.

    Almost a year went by. One day I came back from school and saw a big strange envelope with my name printed on it in English. I knew what happened. My face felt hot and my hands were shaking while trying to open the envelope, so excited...



    Memory Lane (In my own language)-helen-reddy-jpg


    Anyway, I noticed that she wrote my name wrong. That was because of my poor English handwriting but that's okay. I knew she meant it for me.


    <span style="font-family: verdana"><font size="4"><span style="font-family: verdana"><span style="font-family: verdana">












    Last edited by nathanielnong; 01-10-2020 at 09:25 AM.

  18. #243
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    ^What a great story! Nice of you to share that and for sure there's many people around the world with Helen Reddy in their thoughts today.

  19. #244
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    ^ Nice story.

  20. #245
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    K. Nong, was this humorous song before your time? It was still sung everywhere in the early 70s.



    You can probably explain the joke in it better than I can.

  21. #246
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    Helen Reddy, great story.

  22. #247
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Helen Reddy, great story.
    Ditto!!

  23. #248
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    Thanks .... everyone!

  24. #249
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    Still in the area around the Ratanakosin Island… for the last time.

    Sao Lak Muang are city pillars found in most ancient cities of Thailand. Each is usually housed in a shrine which is also believed to house Chao Pho Lak Muang, the deity who guards the city.

    In Bangkok, it was King Paputtayodfa Chulalok (Rama I) who erected the first city pillar in April 1782, when he moved his capital from Thonburi to Bangkok.

    Bangkok's city pillar shrine (also known as ‘san lak muang’) is one of the most ancient, sacred and magnificent city pillar shrines in Thailand. It is believed that people would achieve prosperity and fulfillment in their work/career also luck if they come to pay their respects at this sacred place.

    The shrine is located in the heart of Bangkok, opposite to the grand palace in the southeast corner of the Sanam Luang and close to the Ministry of Defence.

    According to a historian, the shrine was built by the order of King Rama I, the first king of the Chakri Dynasty, on April 21, 1782 after the establishment of the new kingdom, the Rattanakosin Kingdom of which Bangkok is its capital.

    The construction was according to the Brahmans’ belief saying that once a new city is built the main pillar is to be held auspicious so its people will be blessed secure and peaceful, fair and just.

    The said pillar is made of acacia wood. Acacia tree has a Thai name as chiyapruek which means "tree of victory". This wood was used by Thai locals to build a pillar 108 inches high above ground and another 79 inches deep in the ground, making a total height of appx. 190 inches with diameter of 29 centimeters. Inside was placed a horoscope of the capital city of Bangkok.

    In the reign of King Mongkut (Kings Rama IV) who saw this pillar become dilapidated he, in 1852, ordered the excavation of the old pillar and the construction of a replacement with a new horoscope for the city placed inside.

    The new pillar was made of teak wood and covered with acacia planks. It measures 108 inches in height with a base of 71 inches wide.

    Both old and new pillars were moved to a refurbished pavilion with a spire (prang model) on top of the shrine (Ayuthaya style). The shrine was finished on May 1853.

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    In 1980, in preparation for the celebration of the 200th anniversary of Rattanakosin which would occur in 1982, the Bangkok city pillar shrine underwent renovation including the addition of arches to house five city guardian deities.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-jpg


    According to the “In–Chan–Mun–Kong” local legend of the sao lak muang shrine, ancient Thai locals believed that the construction of the shrine required the sacrifice of four people after the proclamation of the words "In–Chan–Mun–Kong" all over the city ("In" from the north, "Chan" from the south, "Mun" from the east, and "Kong" from the west. Each word is common Thai male name in the old days like Jack, David etc.).

    Anyone who responded to one of these names would be captured and brought to the ceremonial location to be buried alive in the hole. Thus, their spirits would guard and protect the city.

    Anyway, this is only a myth. No such record found in any chronicles. Moreover, the Thai kings have always been the principal of the Buddhism so, this is definitely a myth. However, if this is true, it would happen somewhere else not Bangkok.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 02-10-2020 at 08:07 AM.

  25. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shy Guava View Post
    K. Nong, was this humorous song before your time? It was still sung everywhere in the early 70s.


    You can probably explain the joke in it better than I can.
    Well, how much do I want to do that but can't, too local. It mainly talks about the confusion with words, Thai words; dog and pig.

    "dog" in general Thai word, and you probably know well, called "hma" while pig, "moo".

    However, there are more Thai terms called for those 2:

    "dog" = "su-nak" and "pig" = "su-korn"

    And some people has got them mixed up...

    That's all.

    The original version was a smash hit in Thailand in around 1963. I was just a boy and everywhere I went I heard this song.

    <font size="5">

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