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  1. #151
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-60-04-jpg

    Back when I was a boy living in my grandparents¬’ big house. We had these giant clay jars stored the area.

    There are 2 types. One has plain style as shown in this photo and the other is glazed with dragon patterns on the surface. The latter one is more expensive.

    We used these jars to contain water brought by rains to keep as drink water. In the old days, the earth was still clean, clean enough to drink water from the rains. It tasted so refreshing and cool once stored in these clay jars.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-60-11-jpg

    Newsstand in the 60s (those are famous movies stars at that time)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-50fortuneteller-jpg


    Street fortune teller in the 50s (Note: we have all loved King Rama IX)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-30street-vendor-jpg

    Street vendor in the 30s
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 24-08-2020 at 09:23 AM.

  2. #152
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-30charoen-krung-woman-jpgShe was chewing betel nut which was common seen in the 30s

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-60fastfood00-jpg

    Food peddlers in the 1930s and 1960s


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-60fastfood-jpg

    This kind of fast food joint, we call "Kao Tom Kui" (1960s)
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 24-08-2020 at 09:47 AM.

  3. #153
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-30thatchedhomes-jpg

    In the old days (this photo was taken in the 30s), this style of thatched houses was commonly found along the riverbanks. They were made of nipa palms' dried leaves.

    <font size="4"><span style="font-family: &amp;amp">
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 24-08-2020 at 09:48 AM.

  4. #154
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    The Rama VI Bridge is a railway bridge. It is the first bridge that crosses the Chao Praya River in Bangkok. It connects the capital of Thailand, Krung Tep (or Bangkok in farang’s language) and the former capital of Thailand, Tonburi.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-01-jpg


    The construction from a French company started in December 1922 during the reign of King Wachirawut (King Rama VI) to link the Northern and Eastern rail lines with the southern rail lines which cost 2,714,113 baht. At that time, it took 5 francs to get 1 baht or 11 pounds to get 1 baht and that was why the British company which was the competitor lost the bidding. (And I am still dumbfounded why the value of our money at present is in reverse, very f--king much!).

    The bridge was finally finished in the reign of King Prachatipok (King Rama VII) and was officially opened on 1 January 1927.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-02-jpg


    During WW II, the bridge was severely damaged and was repaired in 1950-1953 and officially reopened on 12 December 1953.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-03-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-04-jpg


    For a total length of 441 meters, the bridge is the longest railway bridge in Thailand, almost 120 meters longer than its nearest rival, the 323 meter River Kwai Bridge in Kanchanaburi Province.

    Now, referring to its old age, the bridge is served only for trains and its sister Rama VII Bridge being constructed nearby in 1990 helps serving vehicles.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-05-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 26-08-2020 at 09:46 AM.

  5. #155
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Thai Dai Maru department store
    I remember my mother talking about when it first opened and how the whole family went there

  6. #156
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    I came across an interesting work of a guy named Joaquim Campa. He has created a set of beautiful pictures under the title of "Windows of the World". Some of them concern Thailand.

    This is "Windows of Bangkok"

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00joaquim-campa-wind-bkk-jpg


    This is "Windows of Phuket"

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00joaquim-campa-wind-pukt-jpg


    And the most beautiful one, "Windows of the temples"

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00joaquim-campa-wind-th-templs-jpg


    There are more of his works under this title. You can check here:

    https://twitter.com/joaquimcampa/sta...66943820836864



  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    I remember my mother talking about when it first opened and how the whole family went there
    Yes, at that time, my family lived in Wong Wean Yai. On weekend, we had to drive there and you can imagine how far away it was. I thought we were going to another country.

    Sadly, I have failed trying to find the photo of the Hamburger shop "Wimpy". I bet your mother used to stop by. It's a hip place, very crowded.

    Those good old days....

  8. #158
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Sadly, I have failed trying to find the photo of the Hamburger shop "Wimpy". I bet your mother used to stop by. It's a hip place, very crowded.

    Those good old days....
    Hahaha . . . I never thought of my mother as 'hip'.

    My father worked at our embassy in Bangkok for close to five years - 1960/61-1965/6

    Best posting they ever had, so they said - aside from Sydney maybe.

  9. #159
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Those good old days....
    And just as a fun fact, the German Embassy was located in Sukhumvit Soi 3 at that time before it moved to Sathorn Road.

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    And just as a fun fact, the German Embassy was located in Sukhumvit Soi 3 at that time before it moved to Sathorn Road.
    Good to know more details. I was an old Capital (Thonburi) boy. Did not know much about Pra Nakorn stuff (except those "hip" ones like Thai Dai Maru, Kinnari Nava, Central Silom and Siam Center was just a toddler then) until I went to high School at Triam Udom Suksa. That was when I started to explore Krungtep but it was 'too late'.

    Did you happen to know the very famous toy shop named "Hang (store) Amorn"? It was located in front of Gaysorn Plaza at the bus stop. Tons of toys especially those die cast cars; Corgi, Matchbox)

  11. #161
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    By courtesy of the book, Bangkok: Then And Now, by Steve Van Beek, which shows the city of Bangkok during a time of change.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-00-jpg
    Siam in the 1900s: In Sampeng Lane, a commercial center in the old city, residents of the gem quarter ply their trade, eager for custom on a relatively empty street.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-01-jpg
    The same scene in Sampeng Lane today shows a district thriving with tourists, snapping up handbags, sweets and souvenirs.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-02-jpg
    In 1863, Bangkok's first modern road, New Road or Charoen Krung Road, was built in Chinatown - four miles from the royal family's Grand Palace. A brave traffic policeman manned a kiosk in the middle of the road but this post was abandoned after being on the receiving end of one too many bad drivers.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-03-jpg
    The same road as it is today in the city which is now home to about 22 million people.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-04-jpg
    Cars were introduced to Bangkok in 1900 and by 1904, there were around 300 of them on the city's newly built roads. A car rally along the royal boulevard or Ratchadumnern Road past Sanam Luang, the royal cremation ground. Barely visible in the distance is Wat Phra Kaew, the Temple of the Emerald Buddha.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-05-jpg
    Men from a car club sitting on the ground proudly displaying their vehicles in the early 1900s with the Temple of the Emerald Buddha in the background.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-05-00-jpg
    The Temple of the Emerald Buddha as it is today


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-06-jpg
    This giant swing was built in the early 19th century for an annual ritual to honor the god Siva. Teams would swing to great heights to grab a bag of gold. But by 1925, it was deemed too dangerous and was removed.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-07-jpg
    From 1900, reveals a floating dock, constructed for a royal rite of passage known as 'Teaching the prince how to swim', which symbolized his passage into adolescence. During the ceremony, the prince would climb down into the river while Brahman priests chanted.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-08-jpg
    An ornate twin-elephant gate, erected in 1908 in front of the Temple of the Emerald Buddha. The passage welcomed the return of King Chulalongkorn (King Rama V) from a state visit to Europe. The elephants symbolize independence and power.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-09-jpg
    A mother tends to the hair of her daughter in the palace of a high noble.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-10-jpg
    A princess of the royal court in the reign of King Chulalongkorn.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-11-jpg
    Mourners seen at the funeral of the king. They were dressed in 17th century costumes of Ayutthaya, Siam's former capital.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-12-jpg
    Commuters on a tram traveling across the city which was just beginning to flourish at the turn of the century.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-13-jpg
    Dancers perform Lakhon, a Thai genre of theatre. It depicts an episode from the Sanskrit classic dance-drama, the Ramakhien - the ancient saga of Rama and Sita.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-14-jpg
    Hanuman, the sacred white monkey guardian of Rama and Sita, threatens a group of demons in a Khon, masked dance performance
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 28-08-2020 at 10:38 AM.

  12. #162
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Did you happen to know the very famous toy shop named "Hang (store) Amorn"? It was located in front of Gaysorn Plaza at the bus stop. Tons of toys especially those die cast cars; Corgi, Matchbox)
    No, I was four/five when we left for Lebanon . . . but wouldn't it be great to have those cars now . . .


    And thank you again, very much, for the effort you put into this thread.

    Another member here, Rural Surin/Jeff/Huang Lau is also an avid historical Thailand lover and had a very nice photo thread as well.

  13. #163
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    No, I was four/five when we left for Lebanon . . . but wouldn't it be great to have those cars now . . .


    And thank you again, very much, for the effort you put into this thread.

    Another member here, Rural Surin/Jeff/Huang Lau is also an avid historical Thailand lover and had a very nice photo thread as well.

    Wow... You have been a traveler. I love to travel as well but not until I turned 30. My parents said "Wanna travel? Start saving your money. It won't make you proud if you use ours". So, I did.

    Here are some small glimpses of my big collection...

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-picture-05-jpg

    And thank you for you kind consideration. It is really an effort creating one topic. Got to use a process to make one which consumes time. That's why I can't post very often.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 31-08-2020 at 09:13 AM.

  14. #164
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    The most traumatic event in the history of modern Thailand.

    The mysterious death of King Rama VIII.

    King Rama VIII (King Ananda;1925-1946) the eighth King of the Chakri Dynasty of Siam was only 10 years old and a schoolboy in Switzerland when he succeeded his uncle, King Prachatipok (King Rama VII), in 1935. WW II prevented his return to Thailand to assume his constitutional duties until 1946.

    On June 9th 1946, the King was found dead of a gunshot wound in his bedroom in the Boromphiman Throne Hall (a modern residential palace located in the Grand Palace), only four days before he was scheduled to return to Switzerland to finish his doctoral degree in law at the University of Lausanne.

    He was only 20 years old when the incident happened and had not been crowned on the coronation day as the King yet. After his death, King Rama IX (King Bhumibol Adulyadej, his younger brother) posthumously renamed him to elevate his title equal to a crowned king.

    The details of the events on June 9th, 1946:

    Keith Simpson, the pathologist to the British Home Office and founding chairman of the Department of Forensic Medicine at Guy's Hospital in London, performed a forensic analysis of the King's death and recounted the following sequence of events on the morning of June 9th, 1946:

    06:00: King Ananda was awakened by his mother.

    07:30: His page, But Patthamasarin, came on duty and began preparing a breakfast table on a balcony adjoining the King's dressing room.

    08:30: But Patthamasarin saw the King standing in his dressing room. He brought the King his customary glass of orange juice a few minutes later. However, by then the King had gone back to bed and refused the juice.

    08:45: The King's other page, Chit Singhaseni appeared saying he had been called to measure the King's medals and decorations on behalf of a jeweler who was making a case for them.

    09:00: Prince
    Bhumibol Adulyadej visited King Ananda. He said afterwards that he had found the King dozing in his bed.

    09:20: A single shot rang out from the King's bedroom. Chit Singhaseni ran in and then ran out along the corridor to the apartment of the King's mother, crying "The King's shot himself!" The King's mother followed Chit Singhaseni into the King's bedroom and found the King lying face up in bed, bloodied from a wound in the head.

    After investigating, he found it highly unlikely that the death was due to suicide, noting that:

    - The pistol was found by the King's left hand, but he was right-handed.
    - The direction of bullet fired was not inward towards the center of the head.
    - The wound, over the left eye, was not in one of the elective sites, nor a "contact" discharge.

    The King was killed while lying flat on his back. Simpson noted that in twenty years' experience he had never known of any suicide shooting while lying flat on the back.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-01-jpg
    (Duplicated scene)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-04-jpg
    The King’s bed


    After the trial, three men (the King’s secretary and two trusted pages) were arrested. Their petitions for clemency were rejected. They were executed by firing squad the next day.

    Although it has been widely spoken that those 3 victims were but scapegoats, the mysterious circumstances surrounding the King's death have been the subject of much controversy. Now, since the incident happened long time ago, everyone involved have already died so, the truth is sealed.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-02-jpg



    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-03-jpg
    King Rama VIII (Ananda Mahidol) and his beloved brother, Prince
    Bhumibol Adulyadej (later King Rama IX).


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-06-jpg
    The King’s last appearance at Kasetsart University 4 days before the tragic day.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-05-jpg
    Three scapegoats??
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 31-08-2020 at 09:47 AM.

  15. #165
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    King Rama VIII's funeral


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-07-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-08-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-09-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-10-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-11-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-12-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-13-jpg

    The Cremation
    Memory Lane (In my own language)-8-14-crema-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 31-08-2020 at 09:54 AM.

  16. #166
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    ^^ Very interesting ndeed

  17. #167
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    Excellent interesting thread. Seems to be a like quota on the board. When I tried to like your most recent post, I got a message that I had to spread likes around before I could like your post. So I put a like on panama hat's post, then tried to like yours same results wouldn't allow me.

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalEden View Post
    Excellent interesting thread. Seems to be a like quota on the board. When I tried to like your most recent post, I got a message that I had to spread likes around before I could like your post. So I put a like on panama hat's post, then tried to like yours same results wouldn't allow me.

    It sounds complicated just to give someone a "like". I have never done (and yet don't know how to do) that because I have never browsed any other threads. I've got very less time to browse computer. Being busy with my threads consumes it.

    Thank you very much for your kind compliments. That is very supportive. Not that I expect it but a green reputation once in awhile refreshes my energy lost in creating a topic.

    Thanks ...

  19. #169
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    When east meets (and welcomes) west...

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-eastmeetwest60-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-eastmeetwest60-01-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-eastmeetwest80-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-east-meets-west-1980-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-50welcm-jpg

  20. #170
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    The funeral of one of King Chulalongkorn's daughters who died at the age of 2 (1893)
    Note: The urn shaped casket we call "Koat"

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-jpg


    The little prince, King Chulalongkorn's favorite son (died at the age of 15) at Rachaburi Train Station (1901)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-002littleprince-jpg


    Daily life in bangkok (1890s)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-1890-02-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-1890-04-jpg

  21. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    ^^ Very interesting ndeed
    Thanks!

  22. #172
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    It sounds complicated just to give someone a "like". I have never done (and yet don't know how to do) that because I have never browsed any other threads.
    Safer to stay on this thread . . . . . . and you have received quite a few green appreciation points, hence the large amount of stars and bars under your name on the left

    Have another one.

  23. #173
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    [QUOTE=nathanielnong;4151919]The Rama VI Bridge is a railway bridge. It is the first bridge that crosses the Chao Praya River in Bangkok. It connects the capital of Thailand, Krung Tep (or Bangkok in farangís language) and the former capital of Thailand, Tonburi.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-01-jpg


    I used to drive across that bridge twice a day in the early 70s when I was working at a place on Pibulsongkram Road in Nonthaburi. When the traffic was slow moving in the morning, I would often come across a BMW going in the opposite direction driven by a reasonably famous TV star/singer called Sangthong Seesai. If time permitted, he would wind down his window and point a pistol at me and give me the old "farang, farang" business. I thought he was a harmless ratbag but sometime after that he went to prison. I believe it was something to do with throwing a hand grenade into his audience at a concert, so I guess he was potentially volatile.

    He was very easy to recognise:



    He's the one on the left.

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Safer to stay on this thread . . . . . . and you have received quite a few green appreciation points, hence the large amount of stars and bars under your name on the left

    Have another one.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-thank-you-jpg

  25. #175
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    Just a change of air.

    Let’s visit the realm you might never know exists until you explore it.

    Dark arts in Thailand is generally divided into 4 categories.

    1. Casting a spell to drive something into the victim’s stomach.

    This is the lowest class of all. It is considered to be the most effective on tonsure day; the day before the new moon/full moon. Something to cast the spell on is, for example, an old coin taken from a mouth of a dead person in the coffin, pieces of burial shroud, nails taken from a coffin’s lid and etc.

    The most popular one is a piece of buffalo’s hide which originally is required as a tiny size of a matchbox. After being cast a spell on and driven away, the thing will get inside the victim’s stomach and expand the size. The symptoms are such as not being able to eat, being absent minded, not being able to sleep and etc.

    During the incident, the victims never know what happens to them. Strangely, even scientific devices such as x-ray cannot reveal it. The only way to solve this kind of dark arts is to fight back with ‘bright’ arts such as holy water or Buddhist chants.

    Once, the bright arts being performed and the victims throw up, they will know what is inside their stomachs. From one nail or a coin being cast, several ones will come out. From a tiny piece of animal’s hide, a much bigger one will come out.

    This kind of dark arts is severe, causing death if rescue cannot be reached on time.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-00-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-01-jpg


    2. Controlling

    This is mid-level black arts. Some of them are such as a voodoo doll with the victim's name carved on it or a photo of the victim including the name. Incantation is recited on them first then bury them in some places that could create strong atmosphere such as in a graveyard or a T junction.

    A voodoo doll is kind of more special and also powerfully effective. It has to be made of clay dug up from a cursed atmospheric place i.e. graveyard.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-02-jpg

    Another way that can produce effective result is to place both (a voodoo doll or a photo of the victim) against a small pot filled with rice grain and lit incense sticks. A set of incantation is recited then followed by calling the name of that victim over and over with no rush but constantly.

    When the victim finally get hallucinated or delusional which means the spell is effective now, it is time to do something bad to the victim. A certain kind of needle such as sack needles are commonly used to pierce into the victim's voodoo doll or hit repeatedly on the victim's photo. The victim will suffer tremendously.

    Love potion or love wax are another alternatives to be used. Mostly they are made of dust ground from a certain piece of bone, preferably a skull, of a person who faces suffering death then mixed with incantation recited water or wax. Anyone who drinks or applies it on the skin will be hit by this love spell head over heel.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-03-jpg



    3. Protective Dark Arts

    Talismanic cloth, talismanic tatoos, 'ta-krud' (tiny rolled metal or animal's hide amulet inscribed with magic words), 'lek-lai' (metal charm believed to melt when exposed to fire) are included in this category. Each is said to be able to protect one who wears it from weapons. They were very popular among soldiers in the ancient time.

    'Lek-lai' is more special. It is said to make one who puts it in the mouth invisible!!

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-04-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-06-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-05-jpg



    4. Attacking

    The most popular ones are Wua/Kwai tanu and hoon-payon.

    Wua (cow)/Kwai (buffalo) Tanu (arrow)

    Wua/Kwai Tanu is a type of superstitious amulet being famous in every part of Thailand except in Bangkok. They are made of various kinds of material such as bamboo barks or clay or wax.

    Some who want strong performance must find cursed metals such as nails from coffins or metal rods found in the coffins and etc. then melt them together to form a figure of a cow (wua) or a buffalo (kwai).

    When all is done, a black magic ritual will be performed.

    Wua/Kwai Tanu has to be kept well in a proper place. Food such as hay, water must be provided regularly like you are feeding real cattle. If all goes well they can be extremely powerful in making the owner safe from any harmful things. They can watch over the owner’s house and also keep away bad or evil spirits. If negligence happens they can be so harmful to the owner.

    Because they are a result from dark magic, they can also perform evil things when ordered such as killing.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-07-jpg


    Hoon-payon, roughly means in English as an effigy enlivened by magic, is made of hay or holy thread or pieces of corpse's sheet formed into human being. After incantation recited, this thing will be active. It will look like a zombie and will do whatever its master commands to do.

    Apart from attacking, it can protect the owner from another black magic and also can be used to guard the house. The owner will tie this thing outside the house, to a pole or something. Passerby will catch a glimpse of someone walking inside or around the house.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dart-art-08-jpg


    More will come in due time!





    Last edited by nathanielnong; 04-09-2020 at 09:54 AM.

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