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  1. #426
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    US's Harris, Japan's Kishida condemn China's actions in Taiwan Strait

    U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris reaffirmed Washington's commitment to Japan's defense during a meeting on Monday with Prime Minister Fumio Kishida in Tokyo in which they condemned China's actions in the Taiwan Strait."They discussed the People's Republic of China's recent aggressive and irresponsible provocations in the Taiwan Strait, and reaffirmed the importance of preserving peace and stability across the Taiwan Strait," the White House said in a statement.

    Harris' trip to Asia, which will include a stop in South Korea, comes days after Chinese officials were roiled by an explicit pledge by U.S. President Joe Biden to defend the Chinese-claimed island.

    China sees democratically ruled Taiwan as one of its provinces. Beijing has long vowed to bring Taiwan under its control and has not ruled out the use of force to do so. Taiwan's government strongly objects to China's sovereignty claims and says only the island's 23 million people can decide its future.

    Aides said Harris would work to build a unified approach to that challenge within the region, where leaders have warily watched the increased tensions between Washington and Beijing.
    Biden is expected to hold his first face-to-face meeting as president with China's Xi Jinping during November's meeting of the Group of 20 nations in Indonesia.

    Harris, who is leading the U.S. delegation to the state funeral of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, also discussed North Korea's recent ballistic missile test with Kishida, as well the importance of resolving the issue of Japanese citizens abducted by North Korea, the statement said.

    "The alliance between Japan and the United States - it is a cornerstone of what we believe is integral to peace, stability and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific region," which includes China, Harris told Kishida during a portion of the meeting at Tokyo's Akasaka Palace that was open to press.

    She also called the U.S. commitment to Japan's security "ironclad."

    US'''s Harris, Japan'''s Kishida condemn China'''s actions in Taiwan Strait | Reuters

  2. #427
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Oh god, cue more chinky whining.

  3. #428
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Japan's Kishida condemn China's actions in Taiwan Strait
    Of course they did. Korea, Phillipines, Singapore, India, Malaysia, and hell, maybe even Thailand to soon follow.

    I repeat, there will be no China invasion of Taiwan.

  4. #429
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Of course they did. Korea, Phillipines, Singapore, India, Malaysia, and hell, maybe even Thailand to soon follow.

    I repeat, there will be no China invasion of Taiwan.
    The parasites will still nick all their fish though.

  5. #430
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    In need of parking spaces


    • US Air Force to deploy nuclear-capable B-52 bombers to Australia as tensions with China grow


    The United States is preparing to deploy up to six nuclear-capable B-52 bombers to northern Australia, a provocative move experts say is aimed squarely at China.

    An investigation by Four Corners can reveal Washington is planning to build dedicated facilities for the giant aircraft at Tindal air base, south of Darwin.

    The US has drawn up detailed plans for what it calls a "squadron operations facility" for use during the Northern Territory dry season, an adjoining maintenance centre and a parking area for "six B-52s".

    Becca Wasser from the Centre for New American Security says putting B-52s in northern Australia is a warning to China, as fears grow Beijing is preparing for an assault on Taiwan.

    "Having bombers that could range and potentially attack mainland China could be very important in sending a signal to China that any of its actions over Taiwan could also expand further," she says.

    The bombers are part of a much larger upgrade of defence assets across northern Australia, including a major expansion of the Pine Gap intelligence base, which would play a vital role in any conflict with Beijing.

    The B-52s have been the backbone of the US Air Force for more than 60 years, with the capability to deliver long-range strikes of both nuclear and conventional weapons. The US documents say the facilities will be used for "deployed B-52 squadrons".

    "The ability to deploy US Air Force bombers to Australia sends a strong message to adversaries about our ability to project lethal air power," the US Air Force told Four Corners.

    Asked when the B-52s would begin their deployment at Tindal, Australia's Department of Defence declined to comment.

    'The tip of the spear'

    Some worry having B-52s rotating through Tindal each year locks Australia into joining the US in any conflict against China.

    "It's a great expansion of Australian commitment to the United States' war plan with China," says Richard Tanter, a senior research associate at the Nautilus Institute and a long-time, anti-nuclear activist.

    "It's a sign to the Chinese that we are willing to be the tip of the spear."

    Mr Tanter sees the planned deployment of the bombers as more significant than the rotation of US Marines through Darwin each year.

    "It's very hard to think of a more open commitment that we could make. A more open signal to the Chinese that we are going along with American planning for a war with China," Mr Tanter says.

    Ms Wasser says the growing importance of northern Australia to the US makes Darwin and Tindal targets in any war with China.

    Her work includes running war game exercises to examine how a potential conflict might unfold.

    She says in the war game scenarios where Australia either joined the fight or allowed Washington to use bases in the Top End, "it did very much put a bullseye on Australia".

    “Ultimately these attacks were not successful because of the long range required and because China had already expended its most capable long-range missiles earlier in the game, … but who's to say that in the future, China might have more advanced missile capability that would be better suited to potentially attacking Australia.”

    More in the article........

    US has big plans for Australia
    Keep your friends close and your enemies closer.

  6. #431
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    provocative
    Virtually on China's doorstep . . . well, 7,500 kms away


  7. #432
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    Which part is 7,500km away from China?
    Straya is quite a big chunk of dirt.

  8. #433
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    ^The RAAF Base Tindal is about 6,268 km from Beijing. The US B-52 bombers have a combat range of about 14,000 km.


  9. #434
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    Quote Originally Posted by happynz View Post
    Which part is 7,500km away from China?
    Straya is quite a big chunk of dirt.
    A quick google which I presume to mean Canberra to Beijing


    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    ^The RAAF Base Tindal is about 6,268 km from Beijing. The US B-52 bombers have a combat range of about 14,000 km.
    So the planes could really be stationed anywhere

  10. #435
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    So the planes could really be stationed anywhere
    You want everyone to understand that a big stick can arrive at a moment’s notice

  11. #436
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    The RAAF Base Tindal is about 6,268 km from Beijing
    B52 SPEED - 1,046 km/h. About 6 hours to get to Beijing.

    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    The US has drawn up detailed plans for what it calls a "squadron operations facility" for use during the Northern Territory dry season,
    "The dry season runs from May to October,"

    So if, in May to October.

    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    “Ultimately these attacks were not successful because of the long range required and because China had already expended its most capable long-range missiles earlier in the game,
    And if, the Chinese do not have - more capable missiles or any left in stock.

    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    Asked when the B-52s would begin their deployment at Tindal, Australia's Department of Defence declined to comment.
    An if, "Australia's Department of Defence", agrees.

    The plan has a possibility to succeed.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  12. #437
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  13. #438
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    A spokesperson for China’s foreign ministry, Zhao Lijian, said at a daily press conference in Beijing last night:

    All countries’ defence and security cooperation needs to contribute to regional peace and stability and must not target any third party or undermine their interests. Such a move by the US and Australia escalates regional tensions, gravely undermines regional peace and stability, and may trigger an arms race in the region. China urges parties concerned to abandon the outdated cold war zero-sum mentality and narrow geopolitical mindset, and do more things that are good for regional peace and stability and mutual trust among all parties.


  14. #439
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    China urges parties concerned to abandon the outdated cold war zero-sum mentality and narrow geopolitical mindset
    While backing its murderous russian war criminal chum, Putin.

  15. #440
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    China threat: Andrew Hastie says Australia needs bombers, missiles

    Defence Minister Richard Marles

    He denied that basing nuclear-capable B-52s in Australia was provocative and would add to regional tensions.

    “I think everyone needs to take a deep breath here,” Mr Marles said.

    “In terms of US bombers, they’ve been coming to Australia since the 1980s. They’ve been training in Australia since 2005. All of this is part of an initiative which was established in 2017. We do defence exercises with the United States, and we do them with their bombers.

    “This is an important investment in the Tindal Air Base for which Australia will be a significant beneficiary.”

    Nuclear-capable B-52 to be regularly based at Tindal


  16. #441
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    “In terms of US bombers, they’ve been coming to Australia since the 1980s. They’ve been training in Australia since 2005. All of this is part of an initiative which was established in 2017. We do defence exercises with the United States, and we do them with their bombers.
    China needs to take a seat and chill the f out and stop its incessant whining

  17. #442
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    Quote Originally Posted by S Landreth View Post
    “In terms of US bombers, they’ve been coming to Australia since the 1980s. They’ve been training in Australia since 2005. All of this is part of an initiative which was established in 2017. We do defence exercises with the United States, and we do them with their bombers.
    China needs to take a seat and chill the f out and stop its incessant whining

  18. #443
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    U.S. Air Force A-10 Thunderbolts arrived on Guam last week for a dynamic force employment operation that aims to foster unpredictability in overseas deployments, the service said in a news release Wednesday.


    The attack planes, part of the 23rd Air Expeditionary Wing, flew from Moody Air Force Base, Ga., to Andersen Air Force Base.

    “The United States is committed to being ready to execute missions quickly in unpredictable ways and rapidly respond to adversary moves within and across theaters of operation,” the release said.

    The Air Force did not disclose the exact number of A-10s deployed to Guam. A photo posted on Andersen’s Facebook page showed four of the aircraft — complete with their hallmark paintings of jagged teeth on their nose cones — lined up at the base.

    Dynamic force employment “is designed as a way for Pacific Air Forces to exercise their ability to generate combat air power from dynamic force elements while continuing to move, maneuver, and sustain these elements in geographically-separated and contested environments,” the Facebook post states.

    The A-10, nicknamed “Warthog” for its aggressive maneuverability and those teeth, are designed for close air support of ground forces. It is highly effective against tanks and other armored vehicles and can operate at low speeds and altitude.

    The aircraft arrived about a week after the Air Force deployed an undisclosed number of B-1B bombers from South Dakota to Guam for a bomber task force mission.

    Bomber task force missions are intended to demonstrate the B-1B’s “ability to rapidly deploy anywhere, anytime, and provide lethal precision global strike options for combatant commanders,” the Air Force said in an Oct. 21 news release.


    The American territory of Guam is of growing importance to America’s defense, according to the updated National Defense Strategy publicly released last week.

    “Guam is home to key regional power projection platforms and logistical nodes and is an essential operation base for U.S. efforts to maintain a free and open Indo-Pacific region,” the document states.

    “Within the context of homeland defense, an attack on Guam or any other U.S. territory by any adversary will be considered a direct attack on the Unite States, and will be met with an appropriate response,” the document states.

    A $1 billion effort to establish a comprehensive, integrated missile defense system for Guam is underway, an endeavor some lawmakers regard as urgent given North Korea’s stepped-up missile testing and China’s military ambitions in the region.

  19. #444
    Being chased by sloths Backspin's Avatar
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    Tawain anti China ruling party suffers defeat..looks like singing up to be Ukraine 2.0 isn't going over very well


  20. #445
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    What Are the Implications of the DPP's Defeat?

    The DPP's defeat was a rebuke to President Tsai and her attempt to make the midterms a referendum on China.



    Following the defeat of Taiwan's ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) in local elections over the weekend, John Bolton swings into action doing damage control:

    By demonstrating seriousness of purpose, Taiwan can refute one canard still alive in Washington: that Taiwan’s citizens are insufficiently committed to their own defense. Geostrategist Edward Luttwak recently wrote in these pages of “the persistent fecklessness” of Taipei’s military preparedness, while its “youth can continue to play video games.” Such criticism is unjustified and corrosive, as Taiwan can’t open itself to criticism that it is free-riding on U.S. political and military aid.

    Bolton says that this is a "canard," but the record of Taiwanese military spending speaks for itself. Not only has the Taiwanese government spent relatively little of its own wealth on its defense, but it has also spent it on too many of the wrong big-ticket items that are costly but easily destroyed and not so easily replaced. Bolton says that Taiwan "can't open itself to criticism that it is free-riding," but of course that is what their government has been doing for decades.

    What worries Bolton so much is that there might not be as much tolerance for such free-riding as there used to be. That is why he repeatedly warns about phantom "isolationists" that he thinks might cause problems for the hawkish agenda he is pushing. He needn't worry so much, since the only competition in Washington over Taiwan seems to be how to outdo the other side in expressing unflinching support. Of course, this reflexive support reinforces the very free-riding in question that Bolton is working overtime to deny.

    The Taiwanese local elections turned primarily on local issues, as one would expect, but the DPP's defeat was nonetheless a rebuke to President Tsai and her attempt to make the midterms a referendum on China. It is natural that the party that has been in power for six years would face a midterm backlash, and that accounts for much of the drubbing that the DPP received. This was an election decided in large part by anti-incumbency sentiment and poor turnout from the ruling party's supporters.

    It is not impossible for the party to recover and win the next presidential election, but it seems likely to make it more challenging as they try to extend their control of the presidency to a third consecutive term. Bolton tries to spin the result as having little beating on the presidential election in 2024, but the fact is that this was a significant setback for the ruling party and it was their worst performance in local elections since 1986. One doubts that Bolton would be preaching the virtues of transcending partisanship if the results had gone the other way.

    The emerging view among many analysts after the elections is that increased support for the Kuomintang might ease tensions with Beijing and reduce the likelihood of conflict in the near term. Depending on who succeeds Tsai as the DPP's standard-bearer, the next election could present Taiwanese voters with a starker choice than they have had before. The Financial Times reports:

    Batto said the DPP’s defeat and Tsai’s resignation from the party leadership was likely to reduce the president’s control over the candidate race, allowing vice-president William Lai from the party’s more hardline pro-independence wing to slide into the nomination unopposed.


    If that were to happen, any easing of tensions with China would likely be a brief lull, and a victory by the DPP led by Lai could trigger a new series of punitive measures from Beijing. The U.S. may soon have to be much more blunt in its messages to Taipei that our government will not support a bid for independence.

    https://daniellarison.substack.com/p...cations-of-the

  21. #446
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    China complain about provocation.

    But it’s ok for China to build island runways in the south China sea?

    It’s ok for China to hold war games over the Taiwan strait?

    The US want to deploy air assets in Australia? Is that provocative or proportional?

    Who will cry if the US wants to deploy a variety of assets in S Korea, Singapore, Philippines, Indonesia or Japan?

  22. #447
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    The DPP's defeat was a rebuke to President Tsai and her attempt to make the midterms a referendum on China.



    Following the defeat of Taiwan's ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) in local elections over the weekend, John Bolton swings into action doing damage control:

    By demonstrating seriousness of purpose, Taiwan can refute one canard still alive in Washington: that Taiwan’s citizens are insufficiently committed to their own defense. Geostrategist Edward Luttwak recently wrote in these pages of “the persistent fecklessness” of Taipei’s military preparedness, while its “youth can continue to play video games.” Such criticism is unjustified and corrosive, as Taiwan can’t open itself to criticism that it is free-riding on U.S. political and military aid.

    Bolton says that this is a "canard," but the record of Taiwanese military spending speaks for itself. Not only has the Taiwanese government spent relatively little of its own wealth on its defense, but it has also spent it on too many of the wrong big-ticket items that are costly but easily destroyed and not so easily replaced. Bolton says that Taiwan "can't open itself to criticism that it is free-riding," but of course that is what their government has been doing for decades.

    What worries Bolton so much is that there might not be as much tolerance for such free-riding as there used to be. That is why he repeatedly warns about phantom "isolationists" that he thinks might cause problems for the hawkish agenda he is pushing. He needn't worry so much, since the only competition in Washington over Taiwan seems to be how to outdo the other side in expressing unflinching support. Of course, this reflexive support reinforces the very free-riding in question that Bolton is working overtime to deny.

    The Taiwanese local elections turned primarily on local issues, as one would expect, but the DPP's defeat was nonetheless a rebuke to President Tsai and her attempt to make the midterms a referendum on China. It is natural that the party that has been in power for six years would face a midterm backlash, and that accounts for much of the drubbing that the DPP received. This was an election decided in large part by anti-incumbency sentiment and poor turnout from the ruling party's supporters.

    It is not impossible for the party to recover and win the next presidential election, but it seems likely to make it more challenging as they try to extend their control of the presidency to a third consecutive term. Bolton tries to spin the result as having little beating on the presidential election in 2024, but the fact is that this was a significant setback for the ruling party and it was their worst performance in local elections since 1986. One doubts that Bolton would be preaching the virtues of transcending partisanship if the results had gone the other way.

    The emerging view among many analysts after the elections is that increased support for the Kuomintang might ease tensions with Beijing and reduce the likelihood of conflict in the near term. Depending on who succeeds Tsai as the DPP's standard-bearer, the next election could present Taiwanese voters with a starker choice than they have had before. The Financial Times reports:

    Batto said the DPP’s defeat and Tsai’s resignation from the party leadership was likely to reduce the president’s control over the candidate race, allowing vice-president William Lai from the party’s more hardline pro-independence wing to slide into the nomination unopposed.


    If that were to happen, any easing of tensions with China would likely be a brief lull, and a victory by the DPP led by Lai could trigger a new series of punitive measures from Beijing. The U.S. may soon have to be much more blunt in its messages to Taipei that our government will not support a bid for independence.

    https://daniellarison.substack.com/p...cations-of-the
    Western bloggers/journalists making massive assumptions about Taiwan. Fluff. Clearly pro Chinese.

  23. #448
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    The election result was indeed a rebuke against Tsai- why else did she subsequently resign?

    As for the author-

    We are pleased to announce that Daniel Larison will join Antiwar.com as a contributing editor. Dan’s weekly columns will appear on Wednesday, and will start this week.

    Here is Dan’s first Antiwar.com article:

    Six Years Later, Yemen Is Still Being Starved


    Dan maintains his own site at Eunomia. He is former senior editor at The American Conservative. He has been published in the New York Times Book Review, Dallas Morning News, World Politics Review, Politico Magazine, Orthodox Life, Front Porch Republic, The American Scene, and Culture11, and was a columnist for The Week. He holds a PhD in history from the University of Chicago, and resides in Lancaster, PA. Follow him on Twitter.
    Daniel Larison To Join Antiwar.com as Contributing Editor - Antiwar.com Blog

    Hardly a Blogger.

  24. #449
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    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Clearly pro Chinese.
    Of course it is, it comes straight from Sabs favorite propaganda website. It is complete shit.

  25. #450
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    Intelligent readers are quite capable of reading and deciding for themself snubski. Your constant off topic, ad hom stuff adds nothing to this or any other thread, and just shows what an infant you are.

    So why did Tsai resign from the DPP party leadership after the elections?

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