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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    A time bomb called "Fracking"

    America is becoming more and more like a communist country.
    Freedom of speech? Bologny !
    Being spied one ? The whole White House would have to be excecuted like the Rosenbergs in Sing Sing prison.
    Liberty and justice for all ? Killing, kidnapping and droning is the foreign affairs policy of the U.S.
    But their is also good news ???
    Well, at least they are killing themselves this time.

    Judge defeats challenge to ‘medical gag order’ on health risks from fracking

    Pennsylvania authorities have denied a doctor the right to challenge a so-called “medical gag rule” that prevents him and other physicians from warning the public about the health dangers associated with fracking.
    Dr. Alfonso Rodriguez of Dallas, Pennsylvania filed a lawsuit against the state last year, asserting that Act 13 of 2012 forces medical professionals to enter “a vague confidentiality agreement” that prevents them from having a completely honest dialogue with patients.
    Hydraulic fracking involves drilling through underground shale rock with the help of chemicals - many of them toxic - to release natural gas. Earlier this month, a research team out of Duke University examined Pennsylvania wastewater and found what they described as “alarmingly” high levels of radioactivity, salts, metals, and other potentially harmful sediments.
    Yet the “medical gag rule” forbids doctors like Rodriguez from going into depth about the health problems that chemicals from fracking can cause. Critics have said the bill’s passage, and the court’s refusal to grant Dr. Rodriguez the right to speak freely with his patients, is an indication of just how entrenched the oil and gas lobby is in state politics.
    Rodriguez specializes in renal diseases, hypertension, and advanced diabetes. He “has recently treated patients directly exposed to high-volume hydraulic fracturing fluid as the result of well blowouts,” including a patient “with a complicated diagnosis with low platelets, anemia, rash and acute renal failure that required extensive hemodialysis and exposure to chemotherapeutic agents,” the complaint stated, as quoted by Courthouse News.
    For fulfilling his true responsibility as a doctor, though, Rodriguez allegedly risks violating the American Medical Association’s Principles of Medical Ethics, an infraction that could cost him his medical license.
    That may well happen, because the state requires professional healthcare providers “to enter into, upon request by gas drilling company or vendor, a vague confidentiality agreement to maintain the specific identity any amount of any chemicals claimed to be a trade secret by a gas drilling company and/or its vendor as a condition precedent to receiving such information deemed unnecessary to provide competent medical treatment to plaintiff’s patient,” according to the complaint.
    Despite Rodriguez’s complaint that the provision is a violation of his First and 14th Amendment rights, and multiple briefs filed by medical associations on his behalf, a federal judge dismissed the suit upon deciding the issue was “too conjectural” to stand.
    Although plaintiff alleges that he requires the kind of information contemplated under the act for the treatment of his patients, he does not allege that he has been in a situation where he needed or attempted to obtain such information, despite the fact that he alleges that he has treated patients injured by hydraulic fracturing fluid in the past,” wrote Judge A. Richard Caputo. “Similarly, plaintiff does not allege that he has been in a position where he was required to agree to any sort of confidentiality agreement under the act."
    The decision goes on to state that any attempt Rodriguez made to notify his patients of Act 13’s impact were “merely a prophylactic measure to ease his fears of potential future harm.”

    gag order
    n.
    Law
    A court order forbidding public reporting or commentary, as by the news media, on a case currently before the court.

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Will the Brits follow the U.S. ?


    Dangerous levels of radioactivity found at fracking waste site in Pennsylvania

    Co-author of study says UK must impose better environmental regulation than US if it pursues shale gas extraction



    Scientists have for the first time found dangerous levels of radioactivity and salinity at a shale gas waste disposal site that could contaminate drinking water. If the UK follows in the steps of the US "shale gas revolution", it should impose regulations to stop such radioactive buildup, they said.
    The Duke University study, published on Wednesday, examined the water discharged from Josephine Brine Treatment Facility into Blacklick Creek, which feeds into a water source for western Pennsylvania cities, including Pittsburgh. Scientists took samples upstream and downstream from the treatment facility over a two-year period, with the last sample taken in June this year.
    Elevated levels of chloride and bromide, combined with strontium, radium, oxygen, and hydrogen isotopic compositions, are present in the Marcellus shale wastewaters, the study found.
    Radioactive brine is naturally occurring in shale rock and contaminates wastewater during hydraulic fracturing – known as fracking. Sometimes that "flowback" water is re-injected into rock deep underground, a practice that can cause seismic disturbances, but often it is treated before being discharged into watercourses.
    Radium levels in samples collected at the facility were 200 times greater than samples taken upstream. Such elevated levels of radioactivity are above regulated levels and would normally be seen at licensed radioactive disposal facilities, according to the scientists at Duke University's Nicholas school of the environment in North Carolina.
    Hundreds of disposal sites for wastewater could be similarly affected, said Professor Avner Vengosh, one of the authors of the study published in Environmental Science & Technology, a peer-reviewed journal.
    "If people don't live in those places, it's not an immediate threat in terms of radioactivity," said Vengosh. "However, there's the danger of slow bio-accumulation of the radium. It will eventually end up in fish and that is a biological danger."
    Shale gas production is exempt from the Clean Water Act and the industry has pledged to self-monitor its waste production to avoid regulatory oversight.
    However, the study clearly showed the need for independent monitoring and regulation, said Vengosh.
    "What is happening is the direct result of a lack of any regulation. If the Clean Water Act was applied in 2005 when the shale gas boom started this would have been prevented.
    "In the UK, if shale gas is going to develop, it should not follow the American example and should impose environmental regulation to prevent this kind of radioactive buildup."
    The study also found elevated levels of salinity from the shale brine, which is five to 10 times more saline than sea water, that were 200-fold the regulated limit. Shale brine is also associated with high levels of bromide, which is not toxic by itself but turns into carcinogenic trihalomethanes during purification treatment.
    The US Geological Service has previously reported elevated levels of radioactivity in "flowback" water that naturally occurs in the rock. But the Duke study, called Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania, is the first to use isotope hydrology to connect the dots between shale gas waste, treatment sites and discharge into drinking water supplies.
    From January to June 2013, the 4,197 unconventional gas wells in Pennsylvania reported 3.5m barrels of fluid waste and 10.7m barrels of "produced" fluid. Most of that waste is disposed of within Pennsylvania, but some of it is also went to other states, such as Ohio and New York despite its moratorium on shale gas exploration. In July, a treatment company in New York state pleaded guilty to falsifying more than 3,000 water tests.
    Earlier this year, Vengosh published another report that found higher methane, ethane and propane concentrations in drinking water within a kilometre of shale gas drilling at 141 sites where drinking water samples were taken.

    Dangerous levels of radioactivity found at fracking waste site in Pennsylvania | Environment | theguardian.com

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Fracking


    So What is it?
    Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”, is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside.
    To the site

    Each gas well requires an average of 400 tanker trucks to carry water and supplies to and from the site.

    Heavy Load

    It takes 1-8 million gallons of water to complete each fracturing job.

    Fracturing Site

    The water brought in is mixed with sand and chemicals to create fracking fluid. Approximately 40,000 gallons of chemicals are used per fracturing.
    Fracturing Site

    The water brought in is mixed with sand and chemicals to create fracking fluid. Approximately 40,000 gallons of chemicals are used per fracturing.
    Fracking Fluid

    Up to 600 chemicals are used in fracking fluid, including known carcinogens and toxins such as…
    Fracking Fluid

    Up to 600 chemicals are used in fracking fluid, including known carcinogens and toxins such as… lead, uranium, mercury, ethylene, glycol, radium, methanol, hydrochloric acid formaldehyde
    Down 10,000ft

    The fracking fluid is then pressure injected into the ground through a drilled pipeline.
    The Math

    500,000 Active gas wells in the US X 8 million Gallons of water per fracking X 18 Times a well can be fracked
    72 trillion gallons of water and 360 billion gallons of chemicals needed to run our current gas wells.
    Shale Fracturing

    The mixture reaches the end of the well where the high pressure causes the nearby shale rock to crack, creating fissures where natural gas flows into the well.
    Contamination

    During this process, methane gas and toxic chemicals leach out from the system and contaminate nearby groundwater.
    Methane concentrations are 17x higher in drinking-water wells near fracturing sites than in normal wells.
    Drinking Water

    Contaminated well water is used for drinking water for nearby cities and towns.
    There have been over 1,000 documented cases of water contamination next to areas of gas drilling as well as cases of sensory, respiratory, and neurological damage due to ingested contaminated water.
    The waste fluid is left in open air pits to evaporate, releasing harmful VOC’s (volatile organic compounds) into the atmosphere, creating contaminated air, acid rain, and ground level ozone.
    In the end, hydraulic fracking produces approximately 300,000 barrels of natural gas a day, but at the price of numerous environmental, safety, and health hazards.
    Don't think it's worth it?

    Help support the FRAC Act (Fracturing Responsibility and Awareness of Chemicals Act) which would require the energy industry to disclose all chemicals used in fracturing fluid as well as repeal fracking's exemption from the Safe Drinking Water Act.


    (courtesy of GaslandTheMovie.com)
    Dangers of Fracking

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    They even managed to buy off the US government so that they don't have to reveal what chemicals they are injecting into the ground.

    What Chemicals Are Used | FracFocus Chemical Disclosure Registry

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    Well everyone knew from the start that obama was a socialist, and from socialist to communist is a very small step, politically speaking.

    RickThai

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    Member Umbuku's Avatar
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    BTEX chemicals are the ones of most concern.

    BTEX chemicals (Department of Environment and Heritage Protection)

    http://www.ehp.qld.gov.au/management...ccing-btex.pdf

    The above documents reference coal seam gas mining not shale gas. The fraccing mixture used for shale may be different.

    Suggest you check the US EPA for details.
    The only difference between saints and sinners is that every saint has a past while every sinner has a future.

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    Member Umbuku's Avatar
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    Should add here that in Australia use of BTEX compounds in the fraccing fluid is outlawed. Not so in the US as I understand.

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    Member Bettyboo's Avatar
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    Crony capitalism...

    The judiciary, as we should all know by now, have be bought and paid for by the likes of the pharma, banking and oil companies (who also own the government). When are the American people gonna wake up and take their country back???

    The same applies to Europe.
    How do I post these pictures???

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    Quote Originally Posted by RickThai View Post
    Well everyone knew from the start that obama was a socialist, and from socialist to communist is a very small step, politically speaking.

    RickThai



    Priceless!

    Fooling the population is not a practise limited to any one political group.

    If you think that Obama is a socialist you should do some more studying.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bettyboo View Post
    Crony capitalism...

    The judiciary, as we should all know by now, have be bought and paid for by the likes of the pharma, banking and oil companies (who also own the government). When are the American people gonna wake up and take their country back???

    The same applies to Europe.

    That's more like it. Read and learn, Ricky old chap.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RickThai View Post
    Well everyone knew from the start that obama was a socialist, and from socialist to communist is a very small step, politically speaking.

    RickThai
    Are you telling us that the U.S. is run by ONE man?
    Politically speaking you can call Washington the Politburo.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Could the UK be facing the same fate?

    Fracking hell: what it's really like to live next to a shale gas well



    Nausea, headaches and nosebleeds, invasive chemical smells, constant drilling, slumping property prices – welcome to Ponder, Texas, where fracking has overtaken the town. With the chancellor last week announcing tax breaks for drilling companies, could the UK be facing the same fate?
    Veronica Kronvall can, even now, remember how excited she felt about buying her house in 2007. It was the first home she had ever owned and, to celebrate, her aunt fitted out the kitchen in Kronvall's favourite colour, purple: everything from microwave to mixing bowls. A cousin took pictures of her lying on the floor of the room that would become her bedroom. She planted roses and told herself she would learn how to garden.
    What Kronvall did not imagine at the time – even here in north Texas, the pumping heart of the oil and gas industry – was that four years later an energy company would drill five wells behind her home. The closest two are within 300ft of her tiny patch of garden, and their green pipes and tanks loom over the fence. As the drilling began, Kronvall, 52, began having nosebleeds, nausea and headaches. Her home lost nearly a quarter of its value and some of her neighbours went into foreclosure. "It turned a peaceful little life into a bit of a nightmare," she says.
    Energy analysts in the US have been as surprised as Kronvall at how fast fracking has proliferated. Until five years ago, America's oil and gas production had been in steady decline as reservoirs of conventional sources dried up. Then a Texas driller, George Mitchell, began trying out new technologies on the Barnett Shale, the geological formation that lies under the city of Fort Worth, Texas, and the smaller towns to the north, where Kronvall lives. Mitchell did not invent the technique. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, was first used in the 1940s to get the gas out of conventional wells. As the well shaft descended into the layer of shale, the driller would blast 2m-4m gallons of water, sand and a cocktail of chemicals down the shaft at high pressure, creating thousands of tiny cracks in the rock to free the gas.
    Mitchell's innovation was to combine the technology with directional drilling, turning a downward drill bit at a 90-degree angle to drill parallel to the ground for thousands of feet. It took him more than 15 years of drilling holes all over the Barnett Shale to come up with the right mix of water and chemicals, but eventually he found a way to make it commercially viable to get at the methane in the tightly bound layers of shale. The new technology has turned the Barnett Shale into the largest producible reserve of onshore natural gas in the US. Other operators, borrowing from Mitchell's work, began drilling in Colorado, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania and, most recently, California. More than 15 million Americans now live within a mile of an oil or gas well, 6 million of them in Texas.
    The industry has been quick to publicise fracking's apparent benefits. Electricity and heating costs have dropped. The activity from the oil and gas sector has helped buoy up an ailing national economy and paid for new schools in country towns. Last October, the US produced more oil at home than it imported for the first time since 1995.
    New evidence, however, has begun to emerge that fracking, while reducing coal consumption, is not significantly curtailing the greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change.
    Campaigners warn that fracking is binding the US even more tightly to a fossil-fuel future and deepening the risks of climate change. There have been stories from homeowners of fracking chemicals seeping into their drinking water, video footage of flames shooting out of kitchen taps because of methane leaks. Companies have been fined for releasing radioactive waste into rivers.
    In north Texas, where Kronvall lives, the number of new oil and gas wells has gone up by nearly 800% since 2000. It's impossible to drive for any length of time without seeing the signs, even after the rigs have moved on elsewhere: the empty squares of flattened earth, the arrays of condensate tanks, the compressor stations and pipelines, and large open pits of waste water. Virtually no site is off limits. Energy companies have fracked wells on church property, school grounds and in gated developments. Last November, an oil company put a well on the campus of the University of North Texas in nearby Denton, right next to the tennis courts and across the road from the main sports stadium and a stand of giant wind turbines. In Texas, as in much of America, property owners do not always own the "mineral rights" – the rights to underground resources – so typically have limited say over how they are developed.
    Kronvall moved from the Fort Worth area to the small farming town of Ponder – population: 1,400 – for the peace and quiet, and the affordable house prices; it also meant a fairly easy commute to her job at the survey research centre at the University of North Texas. Wesley and Beth Howard moved into the Remington Park neighbourhood in the same year, two doors down, after making a similar calculation. It was close to where Beth works as a graphic designer at Texas Woman's University. Wesley, 41, a support engineer at IBM, works from home. The neighbourhood was still only partially built, but the developers said they were planning 150 new homes, a park and walking trails on the meadow behind their house. "This was the first home we had together," Wesley says. "We looked at being here for a good couple of decades. It was our expectation and our hope that this would grow and property values would improve and services would come up."
    In February 2011, Beth, 31, had just found out she was pregnant when the couple noticed some wooden stakes with fluttering bright plastic strips had gone up in the meadow behind their home.
    Kronvall had seen them, too, and assumed workers were staking out cul-de-sacs for the next phase of homes. She was away at a work conference in May 2011 when she got a call from another neighbour: crews had arrived with heavy earth-moving equipment. The meadow was about to be drilled for a well.
    None of the neighbours received any official notice, either from the energy company or the town authorities. "The law at the time didn't require them to tell us or give any public notice or anything," Wesley says. "They could just spring it on us as a surprise, and so they did." At that time, Texas law did not require companies to disclose which chemicals they were using to frack the well. Residents say that, to this day, none of them has any idea, though there is now a voluntary chemical disclosure registry at fracfocus.org.
    The crews proceeded to flatten the earth and install a 200ft red and white drilling tower that loomed high above their homes. Convoys of articulated lorries rumbled down the main road. "It was terrible," Kronvall says. "There was a lot of banging and clanging. The number of trucks was just phenomenal, and the exhaust, the fumes in the air, it was 24/7."
    She says the activities on the other side of her fence deposited a layer of white powder on her counter tops. The sound of the crew shouting into megaphones invaded her bedroom. Bright lighting pierced her curtains and made it difficult to sleep. The rumble of trucks and equipment rattled the glasses in her cupboard, and the smell – an acrid blend of chemicals – was all-pervasive.
    "My wife was pregnant the whole time the rig was there," Wesley says. There was the din of diesel generators belching soot, and a nauseating mix of chemicals competing with the aroma of dinner. The noise and smells penetrated to the next street over, where Christina Mills lives. Like the Howards and Kronvall, Mills, 65, was attracted to Ponder because of its sleepiness, and bought the fourth house built in the entire development when she moved to the town in 2001. "But when that derrick was up, you would have thought you were in Las Vegas," she says, "and I live one street over."
    Devon Energy Corporation, the firm drilling behind their homes, did install a sound curtain to try to buffer the noise. Devon – which bought out George Mitchell and has become one of the biggest operators in the extraction of shale gas – says it is committed to supporting residents. "We are always working to find new and better ways to do what we do with the smallest possible impact that we can have on our neighbours," says Tim Hartley, a Devon spokesman. "Wherever we are, we want to have a healthy, safe, best-in-class operation, so we are committed to that and we have delivered that in the Barnett Shale area for many years."
    The curtain did little to muffle the sound or reduce the other effects of fracking, say residents. The Howards' baby, Pike, arrived several weeks early. The couple say there is no way of knowing whether that was connected to the fracking, but they were very nervous about exposing him to possible chemicals from the process. "He was in really good health, but he was still a newborn," Wesley says. "When you can smell diesel exhaust and you have got other unusual odours, and all the things you don't know about what is going on with industrial stuff, it can be stressful. We didn't know what we were breathing in at any given time, and he was breathing it, too. It was what made his homecoming so stressful."
    Two doors down, Kronvall says, her eyes watered constantly when she was at home, stopping only after she had been at work for an hour or two. As well as bouts of nausea and low, throbbing headaches, there was blood when she blew her nose. "I had nosebleeds pretty much throughout the entire process," she says.
    Devon says it is not aware of any complaints about health problems suffered after it began its activities at Remington Park, though company representatives attended public meetings from 2011, and were accused by residents of being dismissive of health concerns. In response, Hartley has said, "It would be inappropriate for us to publicly discuss asserted claims."
    s well as struggling with the noise and smells, Christina Mills says, there was the dust. One morning she found a gritty white powder all over her car, so she stopped at a car wash on the drive to work. "I went there to wash the stuff off, and the black paint came off with it," she says, still shocked at the memory. "It took the paint off my car."
    The three neighbours all tried to stop the fracking, or at least get compensation. They sought legal advice and appealed to the town authorities and state environmental regulators. Inspectors for the Texas environmental regulator came out to Kronvall's home, commiserated about the smell and collected air samples, only to report back weeks later that they were unable to detect dangerous emissions.
    As the neighbours soon discovered, both they and the developer who owned the meadow behind Kronvall and the Howards were powerless because they did not control the mineral rights. The local authorities had already changed the zoning regulations to allow fracking close to their homes, and fought attempts to hold a public meeting about the drilling. Even now, Mills is furious at the way the council treated Remington Park: "They continued to allow them to build and sell homes, knowing full well that they were getting ready to drill behind us."
    She is, somewhat to her surprise, angry at the energy company, too. This is a first for Mills. An accountant, she started her career carrying out audits in the oilfields of Oklahoma. She considered herself a supporter of oil and gas. "In 17 years in Oklahoma, never did I see them intrude on a heavily populated area. They made it personal here, and that's when I had a problem… They came into the back of our neighbourhood, 300ft from the back fence. That is so intrusive."
    There have been cases where energy companies have compensated residents for damage to health and property as a result of fracking. The details of these agreements are closely held because of non-disclosure agreements. The Ponder residents, however, were unable to get their lawyer to pursue their case because their property values are too low: their lawyer told them the potential property damages were not enough to make it worth their while.
    All the neighbours could do, for the eight months it took to put the wells into production, was watch. Eventually, the rig was dismantled and moved on, leaving two oilwells and three waste tanks in the area just behind their homes. Another three wells, six more waste tanks and a large open pond were erected on the other side of the meadow. Heavy trucks still pull up almost every day to empty the tanks beside the well pad.
    There have been scares, too. At the start of this year, a loud whistling sound came out of the tanks and residents wondered if one of the wells was about to blow up. Some residents simply sold up – some for less than they had paid – or rented their homes and moved out.
    Mills now uses an inhaler after developing asthma. "I am not ever sick," she says, "but in the past 18 months I've had pneumonia three times." She has missed about eight weeks of work.
    "It just seems that this has been my whole life," Kronvall says. "It's hard to remember what it was like before, because this was such a dramatic event to go through. You feel violated. How can they come in and do this, and not even consult with the person? No respect for any kind of human decency or rights, just take what you want. And they will do it in the UK, too, if many lessons aren't learned."
    Now it's Britain's time to decide whether it wants a piece of "Saudi America". A report from the British Geological Survey last July significantly increased estimates for the amount of gas sitting beneath the north of England, raising hopes of replicating America's gas rush. The report suggests there could be as much as 1,300tn cubic feet of gas over an area stretching from Lancashire to Yorkshire and down to Lincolnshire. Depending on what fraction of that is recoverable, the gas could supply Britain for decades. The government began promoting the idea that it would be irresponsible not to take advantage, and talked of opening up lands to fracking not only in the north of England, but also in the south-east and Wales.
    The chancellor's autumn budget statement last week included generous tax breaks for fracking companies. "I want Britain to tap into new sources of low-cost energy like shale gas," George Osborne said. "Shale gas is part of the future and we will make it happen." David Cameron has said that unlocking the shale will transform Britain as it has America, driving down energy prices, creating tens of thousands of jobs and providing new revenue for local councils.
    Fracking has not had an easy start in Britain. In April 2011, two small earthquakes and dozens of aftershocks occurred when Cuadrilla Resources drilled its first well in Weeton, Lancashire. The tremors could be felt as far away as Blackpool. The company halted its operations for a seismic investigation, but continued work on its other wells.
    Protesters forced companies to delay or back away from other well sites. Even with those challenges, however, the industry remains committed to going ahead. At least six oil and gas companies have announced plans to pursue shale gas in Britain. Cuadrilla has already drilled exploratory wells at Singleton and Becconsall in Lancashire, and is pursuing another at Balcombe in West Sussex. Celtique Energie and Coastal Oil and Gas have applied to drill in Kent, West Sussex and Wales.
    The main industry body, the United Kingdom Onshore Operators Group (UKOOG), expects a number of those exploratory wells to go into production in 2014 or 2015. The pro-industry Institute of Directors said in a report that there could be 100 well sites across the country in the next 10 to 15 years.
    The industry maintains that fracking in Britain will be vastly different from that in America because of the nature of the geology and more stringent regulations. The Bowland shale is much thicker than the Barnett shale, for example, which, industry experts say, means energy companies will be able to dig many more wells spiralling out from a single site, and so limit the impact of fracking above ground. "The reality is there will be a much smaller footprint for the industry," says Ken Cronin, chief executive of UKOOG. "The other reality is that we have a vastly more comprehensive regulatory system in the UK." Unlike in Pennsylvania, where there have been multiple complaints of contaminated drinking water wells, Britain will require that drillers monitor water quality throughout the fracking process.
    The regulations also require companies to disclose what chemicals they are using, and the British government has already restricted some chemicals used in the US.
    Cronin says Britain would also have higher standards for dealing with the enormous amounts of radioactive and toxic waste water that results from fracking – some 280bn gallons last year alone in the US, according to a report by Environment America. That's enough to flood all of Washington DC beneath a 22ft-deep toxic lagoon.
    Unlike Texas, where waste water from fracking is sometimes left to evaporate in open pits, Britain will require sealed disposal units. And unlike North Dakota, where producers simply burned off excess gas, spewing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, companies will capture the gas and feed it into the national gas supply.
    Perhaps most important of all, Cronin says, there would be strict standards for well quality, and regular inspections to ensure there is no escape of frack fluids or gas into the water supply.
    Cuadrilla believes that these regulations put Britain far ahead of America in terms of protecting human health and the environment. The company, however, has already been warned by ministers about its performance for failing to recognise the significance of the damage to its well following the 2011 earthquakes, and for failing to report it for six months, according to documents released under the freedom of information act.
    The company would respond only to written questions through its PR firm, which continues to maintain that Britain is better prepared for fracking than the US, stating: "The regulatory standardisation and world class performance-based regulations make the UK better prepared for a growing shale gas industry sector."
    Opponents of fracking remain unconvinced. "No system is foolproof," says Caroline Lucas, the Green party MP arrested in August for blocking a drilling site in Balcombe. "No system is entirely robust. We have to make a judgment as to risk and trade-off, and it just seems to me that with fracking, even if regulations are tighter than they are in the US, there are risks we don't need to run."
    Lucas says she is concerned about water shortages – huge volumes are needed to frack a well – especially in the south-east, and about the risks of bringing a new industry into a much more densely populated terrain than America's fracking heartland.
    But Lucas's biggest fear by far is that launching a shale gas revolution in Britain will destroy any prospects of action on climate change. "Scientists are telling us that we need to leave four-fifths of already proven fuels in the ground if we are going to have any chance of avoiding two degrees' warming. Therefore to be hunting around for new sources of fossil fuel seems particularly perverse."
    Another prominent opponent of fracking, the landowner Lord Cowdray, says that if fracking went ahead, he could foresee a scenario of well pads scattered across the South Downs. Some of the proposed sites around Fernhurst in West Sussex, he says, are within 600ft of private homes, about twice as far as the Ponder site from Veronica Kronvall's, but still very close.
    What Cowdray fears most, however, is that the oil companies are not prepared, or sufficiently insured, to deal with a major contamination event such as a leak of fracking fluids or waste into the water supply. "I don't trust the industry," he says. "I think there have been too many contamination events in the past around the world – many we know about and some that we possibly don't."
    Can Britain do it differently? Back in his small town in Texas, Wesley Howard says that, as fracking spread from state to state across the US, he often heard that refrain. "That is the same sort of thing that got said in Ohio, when people said, 'Look what has happened in the Dakotas.' Every state in the US, you hear that story get told one way or another: that the ground here is different, that the types of shale here are different, that the rules here are different, that the companies doing it are different."
    He goes on: "It's always different but, sooner or later, it is always the same."
    Fracking hell: what it's really like to live next to a shale gas well | Environment | The Guardian

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    Maybe Veronica Kronvall and the other people of Ponder, Texas now have a whole new view on what 'redistribution of wealth' actually means. Taken from them, along with their health, to fill the pockets of anonymus shareholders.

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    We are having a fight with this in the Northern Rivers of NSW right now.

    A local poll of rate payers voted 89% saying they didn't want anything to do with it.

    Our local members son works for the gas company so the local police were used to try to force this on the community. This resulted in a number of arrests for chaining on to vehicles, etc.etc. Things got a bit ugly. The share price dropped alarmingly.


    The local magistrate, (David Heilpern) threw out all charges, saying they were a complete waste of taxpayers resources.

    The battle of Bently looms on the horizon.

    It's going to be interesting when the local magistrate seems to be on our side.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lantern View Post
    We are having a fight with this in the Northern Rivers of NSW right now.

    A local poll of rate payers voted 89% saying they didn't want anything to do with it.

    Our local members son works for the gas company so the local police were used to try to force this on the community. This resulted in a number of arrests for chaining on to vehicles, etc.etc. Things got a bit ugly. The share price dropped alarmingly.


    The local magistrate, (David Heilpern) threw out all charges, saying they were a complete waste of taxpayers resources.

    The battle of Bently looms on the horizon.

    It's going to be interesting when the local magistrate seems to be on our side.
    Good Luck !

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    Yes. Excellent idea.

    Lets blast oil into our hands by destroying the earths crust and polluting the soil and surface water so as to poison our food.


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    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnastier
    Lets blast oil into our hands by destroying the earths crust and polluting the soil and surface water so as to poison our food.
    we have been doing much worse things for years and no body has said fcuk all

    fracking is on the small side of sh1t practices by mining/oil-gas exploration

    lowering nuclear sources on the end of a wire down the middle of the drill string to map sh1t - what could possibly go wrong ?

    injecting cyanide mixture underground to leach and then recovering all the fluid back up to the surface without losing anything - what could possibly go wrong ?

    sucking the guts out of the great artesian basin to provide water for a very large mine - what could possibly go wrong ?

    in the pursuit of profits , it all is negotiable

    but sitting in your chair surrounded by all your "stuff" you must remember

    what's mined is yours

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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    we have been doing much worse things for years and no body has said fcuk all
    Sadly shows us that greed trumps principle every time.
    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    fracking is on the small side of sh1t practices by mining/oil-gas exploration
    That's scary
    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    lowering nuclear sources on the end of a wire down the middle of the drill string to map sh1t - what could possibly go wrong ?
    Can't see a problem
    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    injecting cyanide mixture underground to leach and then recovering all the fluid back up to the surface without losing anything - what could possibly go wrong ?
    Seems safe to me
    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    sucking the guts out of the great artesian basin to provide water for a very large mine - what could possibly go wrong ?
    Seems sensible and earthly
    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    in the pursuit of profits , it all is negotiable
    Global Mantra.

    "We're a virus with shoes" - Bill Hicks
    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    but sitting in your chair surrounded by all your "stuff" you must remember what's mined is yours
    That's what they tell you to make you feel better about the industry you're in.

    We have the technology to do this shit hydroponically in 4D now

    Just forget the overpriced shit that shines in the adverts.

    The technology we have allows us to do everything. Just curtail the ridiculously greedy cvnts. That's ALL it will take.

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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    but sitting in your chair surrounded by all your "stuff" you must remember what's mined is yours
    Frack it, get it from ME or get rid of stuff needing oil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton
    We have the technology to do this shit hydroponically in 4D now
    Or ^^^^

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    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert Shagnastier
    hydroponically
    what minerals do you suggest ?

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    ^erb.

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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick
    fracking is on the small side of sh1t practices by mining/oil-gas exploration
    Hardly small.







    These shale plays all reside in sedimentary basins which also contain the majority of groundwater resources.

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    Google "Alfred Fracknasty"

    My great grandad forsaw this shit.

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    the state requires professional healthcare providers “to enter into, upon request by gas drilling company or vendor, a vague confidentiality agreement to maintain the specific identity any amount of any chemicals claimed to be a trade secret by a gas drilling company and/or its vendor as a condition precedent to receiving such information deemed unnecessary to provide competent medical treatment to plaintiff’s patient,” according to the complaint.
    I had no idea.
    This is outrageous.
    It's time the PEOPLE took a stand.
    I hope Dr. Rodriguez has the fortitude to stand up to these arseholes and say fuck you.
    And a lot more like hermanthegerman take the effort to spread the word.
    Time for the people to stand up. A little civil disobediance is in order I believe.
    "In my professional assessment as an intelligence officer, Trump has a reflexive, defensive, monumentally narcissistic personality, for whom the facts and national interest are irrelevant, and the only thing that counts is whatever gives personal advantage and directs attention to himself."

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