Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 76 to 100 of 115
  1. #76
    Thailand Expat
    panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:42 AM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    33,250
    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    There are some very narrow and selfish minds on here.
    And then there's the paranoia . . .



    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    Your convenient ‘friendships’
    Are people I know. Personally. Face to face.



    Quote Originally Posted by Switch View Post
    while FB mines, and sells information for profit.
    There's very little private info of mine on there . . . and I worked in high end niche IT for twenty years, so I have a bit of knowledge and don't just throw around clickbait-words.

  2. #77
    Thailand Expat
    panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:42 AM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    33,250
    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    Can we call time on the myth of Musk as a genius yet and just recognize that he's a fuckwit who was born into wealth and got incredibly lucky?
    . . . and was gifted a few pennies by the government

  3. #78
    Thailand Expat

    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:15 PM
    Location
    Sanur
    Posts
    7,301
    I am quite sure that unregulated and often misleading social media will eventually implode, my apparent paranoia not withstanding.

  4. #79
    Excommunicated baldrick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 08:13 PM
    Posts
    24,348
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    and I worked in high end niche IT for twenty years, so I have a bit of knowledge and don't just throw around clickbait-words.
    there are lots of websites that have farcebooks trackers embedded - probably even this one - so farcebook will know all the websites you visit - there are of course browser addons that can block trackers for you


    this is like making backspit the manager

    Last edited by baldrick; 15-11-2022 at 10:40 AM.

  5. #80
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    43,024
    Twitter’s Last Gasp

    Death is in the air on Twitter.

    On the platform Thursday evening, where #RIPTwitter was the top trend worldwide, users wrote what they feared might be their last posts, offering apprehensive goodbyes and listing the other (more stable) social media platforms where they can still be found.

    They were reacting to the dire news emanating from inside Twitter. Scores of remaining employees at the social media company on Thursday appeared to reject owner Elon Musk's ultimatum to work "extremely hardcore," throwing the communications platform into utter disarray and raising serious questions about about how much longer it will survive.

    Inside the company's Slack, I'm told that a mass resignation effectively occurred after Musk's 5pm deadline for employees to arrive at a decision passed. Hundreds of staffers appear to have called it quits, accepting Musk's offer to exit in exchange for three months of severance.

    Employees flooded the "#social-watercooler" channel with the salute emoji (a screen grab of which I obtained and you can see above), indicating that they had chosen not to sign Musk's pledge. A similar series of events unfolded in the Slack channel earlier this month as Musk eliminated roughly 50% of the company’s then 7,500-person workforce.

    A former Twitter executive, who recently exited the company, described the situation to me as a "mass exodus." Asked about the situation, the former executive told me, "Elon is finding out that he can’t bully top senior talent. They have lots of options and won’t put up with his antics."


    "They will struggle just to keep the lights on," the former executive added.

    That assessment was universally shared by the other half dozen current and former employees whom I spoke with on Thursday. It was already bad enough after Musk executed mass layoffs at the company earlier this month. So bad, you'll remember, Twitter asked some of the people it had let go to come back just days later. The state-of-play has only become more dire since then.

    In fact, Twitter management was in panic mode hours before the deadline passed, people familiar with the matter told me, explaining that senior leaders were "scrambling" to convince talent to stay at the company.

    Musk himself seemed to finally realize grim state of affairs, sending an all-staff email relaxing his previously uncompromising anti-remote work position. "Regarding remote work, all that is required for approval is that your manager takes responsibility for ensuring that you are making an excellent contribution," Musk said in the email.

    It didn't appear to do much good.

    Two employees who I spoke to on Thursday whom had decided to reject Musk's ultimatum were quite clear in why they were doing so. "I don’t want to stick around to build a product that’s being poisoned from the inside and out," one said, adding later that he felt god about making a decision "in line with what I stand for."

    A recently laid off employee who remains in touch with former coworkers added to me, "People don’t want to sacrifice their mental health and family lives to make the richest man in the world richer."

    And Twitter seemed to grasp the mess on its hands Thursday evening, sending an email to staff notifying them it has once again shuttered all of its offices and suspended employee badge access, presumably to protect its systems and data.

    Twitter's already decimated communications department didn't respond to requests for comment. But Musk nodded to the situation in a tweet.

    "How do you make a small fortune in social media?" Musk asked. "Start out with a large one."



    THE SIDEBAR


    "I know of six critical systems (like ‘serving tweets’ levels of critical) which no longer have any engineers," an ex Twitter employee told WaPo. "There is no longer even a skeleton crew manning the system. It will continue to coast until it runs into something, and then it will stop." (WaPo)


    Platformer's ZoŽ Schiffer: "The designers leading Elon Musk’s Blue verified project are out, along with the lead web engineer. Many Twitter employees who maintained critical infrastructure have resigned. This is going to look like a very different company tomorrow." (Twitter)


    "Multiple 'critical' engineering teams inside Twitter have now either completely or near-completely resigned, Alex Heath reported, citing sources, adding that "the team that maintains Twitter’s core system libraries" is also gone. (The Verge)


    News of Twitter mayhem was the top story on The NYT's homepage Thursday night. (NYT)


    The chaos at Twitter has caught the attention of lawmakers, with seven Democratic senators asking the FTC to probe the company. (Reuters)


    The latest restriction on Musk's paid checkmark scheme: new Twitter accounts won’t be able to buy Blue verification for 90 days. (The Verge)


    A group of 180 organizations have called on Musk to combat anti-Semitism on the social media platform after "unrelenting harassment." (Mediaite)


    Meanwhile, at Musk's other businesses... This NYT headline: SpaceX Employees Say They Were Fired for Speaking Up About Elon Musk (NYT)

    https://view.newsletters.cnn.com/mes...0551417e61c43c

  6. #81
    In Uranus
    bsnub's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    28,505
    A tweet by Dan Rather....

    I remember the old saying, “Better to be thought a fool than to buy Twitter and remove all doubt.”
    https://twitter.com/DanRather/status...36720208310273

  7. #82
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    Is this boy ever fucking things up.

    Twitter employees have been told that all office buildings have been temporarily closed - with more staff thought to be leaving the social media firm.
    The managing editor of the tech site Platformer, Zoe Schiffer, tweeted that employees were not given details as to why the offices had been temporarily closed until Monday 21 November.
    There have been some excellent conversations on Twitter this week, one from a senior Engineer trying to explain to him how the infrastructure works and where he was getting things wrong - who he promptly fired - and one from an ex-Engineer that basically said he's an arsehole who hasn't got a clue.

    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink

  8. #83
    Thailand Expat
    thailazer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Today @ 02:25 AM
    Posts
    2,632
    One of the fundamental traits of effective leadership is established trust. At Twitter?.... "poof!"

  9. #84
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Home
    Posts
    29,006
    It's been pretty fkin funny.

  10. #85
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    It just gets better.

    Someone projected insults aimed at Elon Musk onto Twitter's San Francisco headquarters on Thursday night, hours after the deadline for Twitter employees to choose whether to stay at the company and embrace Musk's "extremely hardcore" vision or resign with three months' severance.

    The messages displayed on the side of Twitter's office building Thursday night featuring a rotating list of insults called the bird-app's new CEO a "bankruptcy baby," a "dictator's asskisser," and a "space Karen."

    The message also called Musk a "worthless billionaire," a "mediocre manchild," and a "supreme parasite," among a host of other insults.


    A separate messages beamed onto the building said: "Elon Musk STFU," "#StopToxicTwitter" and "Musk's hellscape."


    Musk sent an email to Twitter's remaining employees at midnight Wednesday PT telling staff they should prepare to work "long hours at a high intensity" in order to "build a breakthrough Twitter 2.0."


    To stay at the company, employees had to agree to Musk's proposed workflow by 5:00 p.m. ET Thursday, giving them just under 48 hours to decide whether to keep their jobs or to accept the severance.


    "If you are sure that you want to be part of the new Twitter, please click yes on the link below," the email read, directing employees to a Google form.


    The Google form showed that less than half of the company's remaining 4,000 employees chose to stay in their jobs and work for Musk's self-described "Twitter 2.0,"
    Insider's Kali Hays previously reported.


    About an hour after the 5:00 p.m. deadline, employees were notified that Twitter's offices would again be closed immediately and that employees need to leave the premises, a person familiar with the directive told Insider.

    Insults Calling Elon Musk 'Space Karen' Put on Twitter's Headquarters

  11. #86
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    Worth a coffee.

    Hours before Elon Musk closed his deal to buy Twitter, he published an open letter to advertisers. Musk knew that big companies in particular were anxious about his plans to dramatically reduce the amount of content moderation on the site. They saw this as a potential threat to what advertisers call “brand safety,” because it would make it more likely that their ads would end up next to deceptive or offensive content. In his letter, Musk acknowledged those concerns, saying that he wanted Twitter to become “the most respected advertising platform in the world,” and that he understood that the site could not become “a free-for-all hellscape.”

    Then, over the next two weeks, he almost single-handedly made advertisers’ greatest worries come true.


    Musk tweeted out a link to a right-wing conspiracy theory about Paul Pelosi, the husband of the House speaker, and posted a photograph of a Wehrmacht soldier with a joke about how messaging technology has improved. He told independent voters they should vote Republican. And he complained that advertisers were boycotting the site because of activist groups’ agitation, and said that if they did not reverse course, he would subject them to a “thermonuclear name and shame.”


    While all that was happening, Musk also hurriedly rolled out his revision of Twitter’s blue-check system. Previously, a blue check meant that you were in some way a notable figure whose identity had been verified. The new system allowed anyone, including totally new accounts, to get a blue check by paying $8 a month and subscribing to what’s called Twitter Blue. This predictably led to free-form chaos on the site. Someone created a George W. Bush account and joked about being nostalgic for killing Iraqis; an account pretending to be the drugmaker Eli Lilly said insulin would be free; and a fake Pepsi account said simply that Coke was better.

    Many of these tweets, it has to be said, were clever bits of satire or agitprop—when Eli Lilly had to make clear that the insulin tweet was false, it effectively had to say that it was still charging for insulin. But this, on top of Musk’s own tweets, represented precisely the kind of turmoil and messiness that corporate brand managers hate. If this was Musk’s idea of protecting brand safety, advertisers had to wonder, what would brand danger look like? By the end of last week, two of the world’s biggest ad agencies, IPG and Omnicom,
    had recommended that their clients pause ad spending on the site, something that big companies such as Audi, General Mills, and General Motors had already done. If you go on Twitter today, most of the ads are for gizmos and weird tchotchkes, such as “magical” ice scrapers or “dragons’ eggs.”


    Musk knows, obviously, that all this turmoil is bad for business. Advertising accounted for about 90 percent of Twitter’s revenue before he took it over, and although his plan is to eventually replace a lot of that with subscription revenue, in the short run he needs the ad dollars. So why has he behaved in such a seemingly reckless manner?

    The answer, I think, is simple: Musk doesn’t understand advertising, or advertisers’ concerns, and so doesn’t take them seriously.


    Beyond not understanding advertising, Musk actively disdains it—particularly the kind of brand advertising that corporations do on Twitter. Tesla, after all, spends no money on advertising. (In its annual reports, the company describes its marketing and advertising costs as “immaterial.”) Initially, that may have been because Tesla didn’t need to run ads: It had a long waiting list for its cars, so spurring demand made little sense. But even as competition in the electric-vehicle market has increased, Musk has remained adamantly opposed to spending on ads. In 2020, a large Tesla shareholder got a proposal for the company to begin advertising onto the proxy ballot but, taking their cue from Musk, a majority of shareholders easily voted the proposal down.

    For Musk, brand advertising is inherently shallow and deceptive, and irrelevant to corporate success. In 2019, he
    tweeted, “Tesla does not advertise or pay for endorsements. Instead, we just use that money to make the products great.” The main reason it might make sense for Tesla to advertise, he’s suggested, would be to buy good coverage, because the media doesn’t write bad things about big advertisers. Even in his open letter to advertisers, Musk was implicitly scornful of brand advertising as opposed to advertising that “can show you a service or product or medical treatment that you never knew existed.” Those are generally not the kind of ads that General Mills runs.


    Now, it may be that Musk is actually right about the vapidity and pointlessness of brand advertising. But from the perspective of Twitter’s business, that doesn’t matter. What does matter is that he can mouth the words brand safety, but he has no meaningful understanding of what that phrase means, or why advertisers might be genuinely concerned. Musk even seems skeptical of the very idea of safety.

    “Be more adventurous,” he
    told advertisers in a conference call last week. “That’s what I’ve done with Tesla and SpaceX and it’s worked out quite well.” But being more adventurous on Twitter is precisely what big, mainstream brands don’t want to do. Foremost in their mind is the downside of one of their ads potentially ending up next to a tweet from a QAnon supporter or a neo-Nazi.


    Presumably, if corporate advertisers continue to stay away from Twitter, Musk will have to rethink his approach. But the fact that he’s already created such turmoil raises a bigger question: Namely, is there any reason to believe that he can do a good job of running the company?


    His many millions of fans would say, Of course there is. He built a revolutionary car company and sent reusable rockets into space, so yes, he can run a little social-media company. But the assumption that because he’s done the former, he’ll find it easy to do the latter rests on the common misconception that all management skills are transferable: If you’re good at being a boss, running one kind of company is much the same as running any other kind of company.


    The problem for Musk, and for Twitter, is that a lot of evidence suggests otherwise. Although certain types of management skills are portable, many others are not. This isn’t just, or even primarily, about experience. Rather, the majority of executives are simply better at dealing with certain kinds of problems, and running certain kinds of businesses, than others. When they encounter situations that do not match their skill sets, they typically struggle.


    A 2006 Harvard Business Review paper by Boris Groysberg, Andrew N. McLean, and Nitin Nohria studied a group of GE executives who had gone on to run other companies. GE at the time was a big, diverse company, which meant that different executives worked in very different industries. It was also a premier training ground for corporate CEOs—other big companies would regularly raid GE’s management ranks. Yet, the paper’s authors found, these alumni were not universally successful.

    Although executives who went to companies that required a similar set of “strategic skills” as the divisions they had run at GE thrived, those who went to companies that required a different set floundered. Similarly, executives who took over companies in industries very different from the one in which they’d previously worked fared very poorly; their companies saw negative shareholder returns of, on average, 29 percent.


    That study, to be fair, had a small sample size. But
    an analysis by the scholars Dovev Lavie, Thomas Kiel, and Stevo Pavićević of nearly 1,300 CEO appointments from 2001 to 2014 reached a similar conclusion: The biggest factor in determining whether a new CEO coming from outside would fail was “a misfit between the CEO’s corporate background and the company’s organizational characteristics.” Precisely such a misfit might involve a CEO going from running companies whose success depends on technology and engineering to running a company whose success depends on creating a welcoming environment for social interaction and satisfying the particular concerns of corporate advertisers.


    This doesn’t mean that Twitter is necessarily headed for bankruptcy. The company still has 240 million active users, and in the U.S. at least, those users are better-educated and higher-income—attributes that advertisers like—than users of other social-media sites. But Musk’s seeming indifference to alienating those users and the advertisers who want to reach them is, in the long run, a losing strategy. For that matter, his approach to Twitter’s human capital—firing half the workforce and telling the rest to get “
    hardcore” or quit—doesn’t exactly suggest someone keenly attuned to social dynamics. Rather than try to learn an entire new set of management skills, he should take the easier, more sensible path: Hire someone who has real experience in social media and strong relationships with advertisers to run Twitter.


    Musk, we’re always told, is a genius. Maybe so, but sometimes you have to be smart enough to realize you’re out of your depth.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/ar...tising/672156/

  12. #87
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    41,488
    It's funny watching his fanboys perform logic gymnastics to try to keep the myth going.

    He's the stupid person's idea of a genius.

  13. #88
    SANS SOUCI
    david44's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    SOFA SO GOOD
    Posts
    17,600
    Could Smoochi manage a reverse leveraged Takeover

    The dating part called

    FITTA

    and TD part

    Whitter

    I propose Ant to draw the dividing line and Lulu to provide the Glitta

  14. #89
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    Today @ 04:20 AM
    Location
    Roiet
    Posts
    33,643
    Guess I'm too old school but imo the world would be better off if Twitter, FB, LINE, et al all folded.
    Last edited by Norton; 19-11-2022 at 05:03 AM.

  15. #90
    Thailand Expat
    happynz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Today @ 03:47 AM
    Location
    inner suburb
    Posts
    11,083
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Worth a coffee.
    Yep. That was worth reading.

  16. #91
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    Another one who doesn't seem to care about leaving.

    As an engineer at Twitter, I can confirm that Elon Musk doesn’t understand anything about our website, or coding in general. Not gonna lie, we laugh REALLY hard about it behind his back. We’ve been calling him “the CEO,” but it stands for Code Efficiency 0.


    — diana thirst  (@rlycalm) November 15, 2022

  17. #92
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    And some more fun.

    Twitter tonight has some serious "everyone gathered around grandpa's bedside at the hospice center" energy except everyone is also making fun of grandpa.


    — ZacharyCohn ZacharyCohn (@ZacharyCohn@mastodon.social) - Mastodon (@ZacharyCohn) November 18, 2022


    The person who does the last tweet should get a prize or something.


    — mjd (@themightymjd) November 18, 2022

  18. #93
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    What a shit show

    Elon Musk's Twitter-buying experiment is somehow going even worse than expected, amid reports that he's locked employees out of the company's office buildings.

    As reported by Platformer's ZoŽ Schiffer, an email sent to Twitter staff yesterday evening informed them out of the blue that they wouldn't be able to get into their offices for the rest of the week.


    "We're hearing this is because Elon Musk and his team are terrified employees are going to sabotage the company," Schiffer wrote. "Also, they're still trying to figure out which Twitter workers they need to cut access for."


    Then, the saga somehow got even stranger today when Musk emailed staff asking them to come to the 10th floor of Twitter's headquarters — which, remember, they'd just been told they were locked out of — for a meeting on the 10th floor.
    Elon Musk Locks Twitter Employees Out Office, Then Asks Them to Meet Him on the 10th Floor

  19. #94
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    43,024
    Former Twitter engineer compares company's current state to Looney Tunes character Wile E. Coyote running off a cliff

    The future functionality of Twitter may be at risk after 1,200 employees resigned Thursday, The New York Times reported, with one former engineer saying the company is as wildly chaotic as an episode of Looney Tunes.


    Since Elon Musk acquired the social media platform for $44 billion at the end of October, the company has made sweeping cuts to its workforce of 7,500 employees. Making good on his promise to investors to cut staffing by 75%, Musk initiated layoffs immediately following the completion of the deal. In the days since, more than 3,800 jobs have been cut. On Thursday, approximately 1,200 more employees resigned.


    One former engineer told The New York Times the company's current situation is similar to when the Looney Tunes character Wile E. Coyote runs off a cliff — continuing on in midair for a moment and plunging like a rock once he looks down.

    MORE Former Twitter Engineer Says Company Is Like Wile E. Coyote

  20. #95
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    The decline of Twitter-4acd822049ab41a2-png

  21. #96
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    Finally got my Mastodon account.

    Now I don't know what the fuck to do with it as I only had it for work

    Here's your irregular reminder that:
    Twitter was a multi-billion dollar company with thousands of employees.
    Mastodon is a niche hobbyist product run by volunteers
    The fact that we're being seen as a viable alternative to them is an admission that a federated, decentralized future is not only possible, but desirable.
    Mastodon is not one thing, or one place. It's a network of many things and many places. We don't have a spokesperson (I mean, there's me. I'm the official spokesperson for of the fediverse, but beyond me there is no spokesperson) we don't have consensus on moderation or blocking or tools or what is good and what is bad. Some of us are professional SREs and Sysadmins, some of us aren't. Some of our instances have been around for 5+ years, some won't be here in six months.
    And that's good! All of it, every last bit of it is good.
    We're wrestling power away from the billionaire class, in real time, and reclaiming it for the People.

  22. #97
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    89,373
    Well it's certainly gaining ground. I expect every there will be plenty of commercial companies rushing to set up Mastodon servers on AWS and the like.


    The decline of Twitter-044b88cb8f2ec7ba-png

  23. #98
    Thailand Expat armstrong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,658
    For a social media account mastodon make it very fucking hard to find people to follow.

  24. #99
    Thailand Expat
    Iceman123's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:11 PM
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    5,414
    Quote Originally Posted by armstrong View Post
    For a social media account mastodon make it very fucking hard to find people to follow.
    I am pretty sure that if you ask nicely, Panama Hat and Dr Willy will give you their details

  25. #100
    Thailand Expat armstrong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    5,658
    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    I am pretty sure that if you ask nicely, Panama Hat and Dr Willy will give you their details
    I'm sure they will find me and then respond to every post claiming I'm stalking them.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •