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  1. #1701
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    Quote Originally Posted by malmomike77 View Post
    At least they have saved one, such a shame many of the old buildings in BKK went the way of the bulldozer

    Attachment 101967

    not my pic

    Yes, what a shame! Especially those manors/palaces that belonged to the royalty.

  2. #1702
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    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows Jacqueline Kennedy shopping at an antique shop in Ratchaprasong area on November 9th, 1967.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a12-jpg

  3. #1703
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    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows tram in Bangkok (early 1960s).

    Tram services started in late 1800s. In 1968, they were all suspended following discussion that they took up road space, coupled with the significant increase in road traffic, as well as cheaper bus operation on the same line. Tram fares ranged from 10 to 50 satang (100 satang = 1 baht), depending on class.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a03-jpg

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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a25-jpg


    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows
    the statue of King Rama I (1782 – 1809) housed inside Prasat Phra Thep Bidon which is located within the Grand Palace.

    Known in English as the Royal Pantheon, the purpose of the building serves as a memorial to the Chakri Dynasty predecessors. King Rama VI had full-size, lifelike statues of the first five Chakri kings made and installed in the pantheon. Further statues were added in 1927, 1959 and 2020. Currently, the pantheon contains nine statues. Normally closed to the public, the pantheon is opened annually on 6 April for Chakri Memorial Day.

    The original photo was shot in early 1900s.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a25-01-jpg

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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a24-jpg


    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows one of King Rama V’s Queen Consorts dressed in a combination of Siamese and western style.

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    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows a replica of Dusit Maha Prasat Palace (one of the minor palaces located within the vicinity of Grand Palace) that was soon to be shipped, among the other stuff, to be displayed at The Centennial International Exhibition of 1876, the first official World's Fair to be held in Philadelphia, United States.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a16-jpg

  7. #1707
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    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows one of King Rama IV (1851 – 1868)’s wives (b. 1840 – d. 1924) who was born a commoner. In the reign of King Rama V (1868 – 1810), she gained the King’s trust and was appointed as the head of the internal administration and also the treasury supervisor.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a07-jpg

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    Admiral Prince Abhakara Kiartivongse, Prince of Chumphon (1880 –1923) was the 28th child of King Rama V. He was commonly revered as "The Father of the Thai Navy".

    Away from his navy duties, the Prince also studied medicine and had a particular interest in herbal medicine. Treating patients from all walks of life, he was famously known as ‘Moh (Doctor) Phon (read as Porn)’.

    With a reputation for compassion, he was also believed to possess supernatural powers. Although he died in 1923, those who believe in the powers of Sadej Tia (the ‘Royal Father’) say his spirit is still around. Some people, especially those involved with the navy or those who work at sea, will carry amulets of the Prince which they believe will protect them.

    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows Moh Phon in his laboratory at his home.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a14-jpg

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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a05-jpg



    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows the demolition of the ‘all teak’ palace of the rulers of Chiengmai Kingdom. The land on which the palace was built was located on the banks of the Chao Praya River, Bangkok. It had been granted since the reign of King Rama IV (1851-1868). This was the place for the rulers of Chiengmai who came to pay respect and tribute to the kings of Siam.


    The last of Chiengmai royalty who resided in this palace was Dara Rasami (1873-1933), one of King Rama V’s Queen Consorts.

    The demolition began after the Princess moved back to Chiengmai after her husband, King Rama V, died in 1910. The right of the land was returned to the government’s.

    Now, the land is a part of Siriraj Hospital.

  10. #1710
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Admiral Prince Abhakara Kiartivongse, Prince of Chumphon (1880 –1923) was the 28th child of King Rama V. He was commonly revered as "The Father of the Thai Navy".

    Away from his navy duties, the Prince also studied medicine and had a particular interest in herbal medicine. Treating patients from all walks of life, he was famously known as ‘Moh (Doctor) Phon (read as Porn)’.

    With a reputation for compassion, he was also believed to possess supernatural powers. Although he died in 1923, those who believe in the powers of Sadej Tia (the ‘Royal Father’) say his spirit is still around. Some people, especially those involved with the navy or those who work at sea, will carry amulets of the Prince which they believe will protect them.

    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows Moh Phon in his laboratory at his home.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a14-jpg
    Great Mustache!

  11. #1711
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalEden View Post
    Great Mustache!

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    In the early Rattanakosin period (between the reigns of King Rama I and Rama V or 1782 - 1910), Siamese had a tradition of not cremating the dead within the city walls, because it was believed to be an evil portent. Wat Saket was outside the city walls and the closest, so it was often used as a place to cremate dead bodies, which were carried through the Pratu Phi or 'ghost gate'.

    In 1820, during the reign of King Rama II (1809–1824), cholera spread from Penang to Bangkok, leading to more than 30,000 deaths in the capital. Wat Saket became the main receiving ground of many dead bodies that were moved in everyday, along with Wat Sangwet in Bang Lampoo area and Wat Choeng Lane in Sampheng area.

    Due to the large number of deaths, the temple was unable to cremate every dead body; some of the bodies were therefore left in the open area of the monastery, and vultures began coming down to devour them.

    The temple became the main food court for vultures, and there were outbreaks of cholera every dry season until the early reign of King Rama V. The severest outbreak was in 1840 during the reign of King Rama III when one in ten people in Siam and the surrounding areas were killed by the disease. The last spreading of the disease took place in 1881, when many hundreds died each day.

    The vultures became a grim image and reminder of the deaths, and Raeng Wat Saket ('vultures of Wat Saket') has become a common saying, often paired with Pret Wat Suthat ('preta of Wat Suthat', probably a reference to legends surrounding the wall murals of that temple).


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a18-jpg

    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows a ‘all you can eat’ buffet at Wat Saket. A few undertakers were seen organizing the discipline.

  13. #1713
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    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows ‘kuay teaw ruea’ in 1936. The history of ‘kuay teaw ruea’ can be traced back to Ayuthaya Kingdom which was sold by ‘kon jene’ migrating from China. It was sold by the rivers because around that time the business in Siam was water based.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a09-jpg
    (cool hat!)

  14. #1714
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    The history of ‘kuay teaw ruea’ can be traced back to Ayuthaya Kingdom which was sold by ‘kon jene’ migrating from China.
    Nathaniel, is that the root of the 'boat noodle shops' that sell noodles, often with a wooden boat at the front? I have eaten at them many times and I'm still not sure what makes them different from other noodle shops without a boat.

  15. #1715
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    I have eaten at them many times and I'm still not sure what makes them different from other noodle shops without a boat.
    My understanding along with a lot of sampling is the boat noodles are often served in very small portions with lower prices. If you go with the younger crowd you often see competitions to see who can eat the most bowls. Six bowls plus seems to be common.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    My understanding along with a lot of sampling is the boat noodles are often served in very small portions with lower prices. If you go with the younger crowd you often see competitions to see who can eat the most bowls. Six bowls plus seems to be common.
    Could be. I always order the large size. The gf sometimes gets 2 different tastes.

  17. #1717
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    Nathaniel, is that the root of the 'boat noodle shops' that sell noodles, often with a wooden boat at the front? I have eaten at them many times and I'm still not sure what makes them different from other noodle shops without a boat.
    Yes, this is the origin. It has come first since the Ayuthaya era after the migration of the Chinese, who brought 'kuay tew' with them many centuries ago.

    There is no difference between with and without boats, same ingredients and same tastes. Just that with boats, say, is a vintage style imitating the old way since back then the transportation in Siamese was water based.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 16-06-2023 at 11:57 AM.

  18. #1718
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    My understanding along with a lot of sampling is the boat noodles are often served in very small portions with lower prices. If you go with the younger crowd you often see competitions to see who can eat the most bowls. Six bowls plus seems to be common.
    You are so right! Kuay Tew Ruea at the Victory Monument was very popular back then. You might see me and my gang 'devoured' it not less than 6 bowls each. That was then. Such scene is no more now.

    If I may suggest the best Kuay Tew Ruea (without boats) now is 'Tong Smith'. You can check here below.

    Thong Smith DuangrithiFoodStylist.com

  19. #1719
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    The Royal Cemetery is located at the western side of the grounds of Wat Ratchabophit in Bangkok.

    The cemetery contains monuments to numerous members of the Thai Royal Family, particularly those most closely related to King Rama V.

    The monuments come in a variety of shapes, styles and sizes. Each monument is given a number, displayed externally at the base of the structure in Thai numerals. There are 34 in all. Monument No. 3 is defunct and no longer extant so was removed, its contents having been moved into Monument No. 2.

    The colorized B&W photo is courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a27-jpg

  20. #1720
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    'Tong Smith'
    Thanks. I'll look out for it when next in town.

  21. #1721
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    Thanks. I'll look out for it when next in town.
    Just came back from there, at Soi Ari, Paholyothin Rd, BKK. ! I think I didn't see the 'kluay kaek (deep fried banana)' menu in the pamphlet. If you go there, it is a recommendation, very unique.

    Tell them you want the kind of 'kluay numwa'.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a10-01-jpg

  22. #1722
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a10-jpg


    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows Queen Mother of Norodom, King of Cambodia (1860 - 1904) named Kasatrey Pen whose husband was Ang Duong, the previous King of Cambodia (1841- 1844 and 1845 – 1860).

    King Ang Duong is acclaimed as a promoter of national unity after centuries of regress and venerated among modern Cambodians for his efforts to revitalize the nation and protect the kingdom from foreign invasion. However, limited power, poverty and internal dissension prevented lasting success. He spent 27 years in Bangkok from the age of 16 until aged 43. During his residence in Thailand Ang Duong composed poetry, authored and published classical Cambodian literature. He translated the Cambodian folktale Vorvong & Sorvong into the Thai language as a birthday present for Thai Crown Prince Mongkut (later, King Rama IV).

    In 1843 Ang Duong was crowned King of Cambodia in Bangkok and returned to Oudong, Cambodia.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 19-06-2023 at 11:59 AM.

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    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows a view in the Siriraj medical school, 1936.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a01-jpg

  24. #1724
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    The colorized B&W photo courtesy of ‘Page Siam Colorization by Noomrattana’ shows a group of medical students at the Siriraj medical school listening to the lecture under the supervision of the ‘class principle’ in 1936.

    The original photo was taken by Robert Larimore Pendleton, an American scientist and soils expert who was appointed to the new Department of Geography at the Johns Hopkins University in 1946 before coming to work in Siam.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a02-jpg

  25. #1725
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    I am somewhat surprised at the number of women students in a Med School! In the US or UK in 1936 you might have seen one or two women in a class, here in Thailand they made up at least 50% of the students!

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