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  1. #1001
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-09-jpg

    The sensual sons (my own English adaptation), the dark side of ancient Buddhism in Siam.

    As normally known that, since the beginning, every wat has had ‘dek wat’ whose jobs are responsible of various kinds of wat chores (for instance, the 3rd photo on page 38/929).

    But in the ancient days (and probably today, still), there was a special kind of ‘dek wat’ who were raised privately by senior monks and became secret tradition among them. These senior monks groomed these boys better than the others and used to them as sex slaves.

    These boys were locally called ‘loog sawat (= the sensual sons)’ and kept in private collection.

    There were often that these senior monks fought and injured each other over a beautiful dek wat in order to get him in his own loog sawat
    collection.

    The records of this story had already been known since the reign of King Rama I who deemed these monks very perverted and shameful and a disgrace to the country.

    Therefore, he enacted the law of the monks
    to be used to punish the offenders.

    There was a part included in old record that mentioned about this story:

    “When these monks meet ‘dek wat’ and are attracted to their youthful faces which make them feel sexually aroused. They try to approach them and lure them to their private cubicles then have sex with them. After that these dek wat become their possession. They groom these dek wat and have them trail along wherever they go making a very obscene sight to see...”

    (Note: Photo taken in the reign of King Rama IV)
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 26-07-2021 at 08:53 AM.

  2. #1002
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a02-jpg

    The position titled ‘Aide-de-camp’ was established in the reign of King Rama V. The name has been changed to ‘Royal Bodyguard’ in 1891.

    This computer colored version shows King Rama V’s Chief of aide-de-camp (from the Bunnag clan) with his family shot at his home by klong ‘Somdej Chao Praya’, Thonburi area.

    Sitting next to him on the bench was his ‘principle wife – (mea luang). The rest that were sitting on the ground were his ‘wives – (mea noi)’!

    Note: It was the time of ‘betel quid chewing’ era.

  3. #1003
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    The British Dispensary Group is, as of today, a Thai pharmaceutical and cosmetics group of companies.

    It was originally founded in 1892 (the reign of King Rama V) by a Scottish doctor named Peter Gowan (left) and an American doctor Thomas Heyward Hays (right), both of whom had been in the service of the government of King.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-01-jpg


    Their business was one among several modern pharmacies that emerged in the country toward the end of the nineteenth century, and was a well-known establishment on the corner of Charoen Krung Road (New Road) and Surawong Road in what was the city's European district.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-02-01-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-03-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-02-02-jpg


    After a few years, Gowan passed the business onto Hays, and a second branch was opened in 1897 at Si Kak Praya Sri in what was then the inner city.

    Hays operated the business until 1906, when he transferred his interests to J. J. McBeth, who had joined the firm in 1898.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-04-jpg


    In 1928, McBeth retired to his home country, and sold the business to Luan Vongvanij, a Chinese immigrant who had previously been an apprentice at the store. Since then, the business has been largely owned by the family, with Luan handing control to his sons Boonchit and Boonyong in 1963, and Boonyong to his son Anurut in 1993.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-05-jpg


    The group produces personal care products as well as medications and supplements. It is best known for its Snake brand Prickly Heat cooling powder, so-named after the company's trademark, which had long been known by locals as ‘Tra Ngu’ (= 'snake brand').

    It also produces other personal care products under the Snake Brand, as well as St. Luke's baby powder and Quinna skin tonic. Its annual revenue was about 1.2 billion baht in 2009.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-06-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-07-jpg
    At Sri Praya


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-08-jpg
    At Suea Pa Road


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-09-jpg
    The company’s trademark since the beginning. Because the English name was very hard for Siamese tongue so, they called it as ‘Hung Kai Ya Anglit Tra Ngu (= Sneak Brand British Pharmacy)’.

    This term has finally replaced the English term and become the company’s official name when the company was run by all Thai people in 1928.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-02-01-jpg   Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-02-02-jpg   Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-05-jpg   Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-06-jpg   Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-07-jpg  

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-08-jpg   Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-09-jpg  
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 27-07-2021 at 09:25 AM.

  4. #1004
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    35-40 years ago it was on New Road between the Oriental and the GPO, by far the best pharmacy and totally English speaking back then.

  5. #1005
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    It was originally founded in 1892 (the reign of King Rama V) by a Scottish doctor named Peter Gowan (left) and an American doctor Thomas Heyward Hays (right), both of whom had been in the service of the government of the King.
    Dr. Thomas Heyward Hays was later to commission a library in memory of his late wife, Jennie Neilson Hays.

    It opened on June 26, 1922.

    https://neilsonhayslibrary.org/about/history/

  6. #1006
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    A part of history related to the event in 1776 when Ong Chiang Chun and group of Vietnamese fled from Ha Tien of Vietnam to Bangkok. King Taksin, the Great who reigned the Kingdom of Thonburi allowed them to live in the area called today as “Pahurat”.

    Later, Ong Chiang Chun was caught of being a spy and was executed. Other Vietnamese were banished from the kingdom.

    In King Rama I’s reign, they were permitted to come back and settle in the areas called Talad Noi and Bang Poh.

    At that time, these Vietnamese, who were Buddhist but different branches, cooperated in building two temples for the Vietnamese monks, Wat Kan Yoeng Toe (Wat Yuan Talad Noi) and Wat Kwang Poek Toe (Wat Yuan Bang Poh)... (Yuan = Vietnamese)

    Wat Kan Yoeng Toe or Wat Yuan Talad Noi is a sizeable temple located in the Talad Noi, Samphanthawong area of Bangkok.

    It has been assumed that this temple was originally built in 1787.

    Back when King Rama IV was still Prince Mongkut and ordained as a monk in the reign of his half-brother, King Rama III, he met a Vietnamese senior monk named Ong Hueng who gave a talk about Mahayana Buddhism and the Prince was enthusiastic.

    When the Prince took the throne, he gave Ong Hueng a monk title of Pra Kru Kananam Samanachan and a main position in administrating all Vietnamese monks in the country.

    Later on, King Rama V named Wat Yuan Talad Noi as "Wat U Phai Rat Bumrung". Of which, ‘u-phai’ means ‘two’ which explains that it was supported by two monarchs.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-08-01-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-08-02-jpg


    Note: Below are photos of Wat Kwang Poek Toe or Wat Yuan Bang Poh or officially, Wat Anamnikayaram

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-08-03-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-08-04-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 28-07-2021 at 10:22 AM.

  7. #1007
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-05-01-jpg

    The first talking movie studio in Thailand was named “Sri Krung Studio” or also known as 'Thai Hollywood'. It was built in 1935 on a rice field of which the area was described back then as "a remote area in Bangkok called ‘Tung (= field) Bang Kapi’".

    This place was later passed by Sukhumwit Road, around the area where Soi Asoke was built. At present, the site is said to be near the MRT Sukhumwit.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-05-02-jpg

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 29-07-2021 at 09:57 AM.

  8. #1008
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    King Rama IV

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-4-1824-27-jpg


    King Rama V

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-5-1873-15-jpg


    King Rama VI

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-6-1904-jpg


    King Rama VII

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-7-jpg


    King Rama IX

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-9-1951-jpg


    King Rama X

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-10-1978-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 29-07-2021 at 10:05 AM.

  9. #1009
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a03-jpg

    The computer colored photo shows the Islamic burial building located inside the Takia Yokin mosque in Ayutthaya shot in the reign of King Rama V in 1896.


    It was built over the tomb of Toh Takia, an Indian, who came into Ayutthaya Kingdom in 1554 in the reign of King Chakrapat of the Kingdom of Ayutthaya to spread Islam.

    It is believed that Toh Takia had magic. He once used it to compete with a Siamese abbot who also had good maneuver in this kind of art.

    Legend says that Toh Takia defeated the Siamese abbot. The abbot felt enthusiastic so much that he left the monkhood and embraced Islam instead.

    The two became best friends and tried to spread their religion.

    Toh Takia died first in 1579 in the reign of King Maha Thummaracha. His body was interred in a burial ground. Seven years later the abbot died and his bodied was also interred near Toh Takia’s.

    Later on, the Muslim donated their money to build this building, shown in the photo above, over these two tombs and since then it has become a sacred place.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a03-01-jpg
    (Today)


  10. #1010
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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a06-jpg

    The computer colored photo shows the Royal Ploughing Ceremony held in 1917 in the reign of King Rama VI at Payatai Field (now the area that covers Pra Mongkutklao Hospital and around).

    (More story on page 28/682)

  11. #1011
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    Praya Palazzo Building or formerly named Ban (=house) Bang Yi Khan is located on the banks of the Chao Praya River. It was the residence of Praya Chonlapunpanich who was a Chinese noble in the reign of King Rama V. He was the founder of Anekwanich family.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-01-jpg


    The house was built in 1923 in the reign of King Rama VI.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-02-jpg


    In 1938, Praya Chonlapunpanich passed away. The house was passed on to Mr. Panchit Anekavanich, his 7th son. The descendants of Praya Chonlapunpanich still lived in this Ban Bang Yi Khan until the world had turned. More cars were used than boats. Finally the Anekwanich family moved from this off-road house to live in the Sukhumvit area and left this house abandoned.

    In 1955, the house was sold to Bangkok Noi Muslim Group to use as the building of Ratchakarun School for providing education to disadvantaged children of all religions with cheap tuition fee. This caused funding problems. It had run for 22 years before shut down in 1977.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-03-jpg


    Later on, the building has been leased by a vocational school until 1996. After that, the building was deserted.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-04-jpg


    It later, has been rented by Praya Palazzo Com. Ltd. since 2008. The company executives led by Asst. Prof. Wichai Pitukworarat restored the building and it becomes a hotel and a restaurant named Praya Palazzo.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-05-jpg


    Although the building was abandoned for a long time and damaged by flooding from time to time and the restoration to maintain the original style is very hard, the working team was able to do very well. This valuable building has been preserved for the architecture and the history of the nation.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-06-jpg


    View more photos here:
    พระยา พาลาซโซ โรงแรมลึกลับริมแม่น้ำเจ้าพระยาที่ต้องนั่งเรือไปเท่ านั้น - The Cloud
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 31-07-2021 at 02:45 PM.

  12. #1012
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    The tradition of building a wat had been established since the Ayutthaya period and continued to arrive in the early Rattanakosin’s.

    This tradition hit its peak in the reign of King Rama III (1824-1851) because the city was now more stable and wealthier through trade than before. People with high positions and wealth such as royalty, nobility, magnate, were all devoted to building wat.

    During that reign, there was a saying: "Any philanthropists who also like to build wat are the King’s favorites".

    Wat Mu located on the edge of Khlong Dan (in Pasri Charoen District) is one of them. It is an ancient Wat whose name was said to have been originated from the occupation of the builder who was a Chinese named Wu. His occupation was to raise and sell pigs (= mu or moo). When came the time of him being rich from trading, he did not hesitate to build a wat as according to the traditions of the laity in those days.

    Later on, the Wat became dilapidated. One of the King’s Royal Concubines who was his favorite and also had faith in Buddhism renovated the Wat to be back as good shape as before. When finished, the King elevated it as a royal temple and gave a new official name as ‘Wat Ubsornsawan (ubsorn = angel / sawan = heaven)”

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a05-jpg
    (The original of this computer colored photo was shot in the reign of King Rama V)
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 01-08-2021 at 02:45 PM.

  13. #1013
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    In the early Rattanakosin period, the kings did not allow farang who came here on ‘whatever’ missions to set up their residences in the center of Bangkok.

    They were allowed to go down south along the Chao Praya River where a large and rich ancient civilization was originally there.

    It was the Mon community of which the girls were so beautiful that those farang were attracted to them, married them and finally settled down there.

    There came a time when a German with a camera came to visit this community. He took a lot of photos including this one shown below.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-06-01watpichayonpolasepbkk-jpg


    He was surely told of the name of this Wat but it was certainly hard for him to adjust his tongue according to the genuine pronunciation. So, he just recorded the name in simple German. Later, that set of photos went worldwide.

    Later on, this photo was brought back to Thailand. Tons of historians joined their heads together and tried to figure out the actual name of the Wat and where it exactly was but they all failed.

    Time went by until one day (don’t know when), a local happened to see this photo and could tell simply that this Wat is named ‘Paichayon Polasep’ which is located in Pra Padang District, Samut Prakarn Province.

    According to the tome, Wat has been mentioned (though back then its name was a simple one) since the reign of King Rama I (1782-1809).

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-06-02-3-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-06-03-3-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 02-08-2021 at 08:57 AM.

  14. #1014
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    1937, Peep Show Admission fee 1 satang (BKK)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1937peepshowadmission-1-satangbkk-jpg


    1920, Jinton Osot (= drugs) Billboard (BKK)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1920jintonosotbillboard-jpg

  15. #1015
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    A documentary (photos not included) titled: Ang-yi (in a nutshell)

    The word ‘Ang-yi’ is quite familiar with Thai people and some farung. One of the most popular Thai-English dictionaries gives it a meaning as “Chinese secret society” and explains that it is a Chinese Teochiu word meaning “secret society of the Chinese.

    However, the newest Thai-English dictionary, published in 2004 gives an essentially juridical definition: Ang-yi is an unlawful organization with no mention of an ethnic group.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-03-jpg


    However, until the Fifth Reign of the Chakri Dynasty, Chinese secret societies were known as ‘Tua-hia’ meaning “big brother”. We don’t know how come the word Ang-yi came to be so widespread, but it seems that at first it was only the name of a particular Chinese secret society among many others.

    Most historians who wrote about Ang-yi noted that Thai official records (archives) do not mention Ang-yi before the first year of the third reign of the Chakri Dynasty, and concluded that Ang-yi materialized in Siam during the second reign (1809-1824).

    However, the chronicles of Ayutthaya mention at least one big scale revolt by Chinese in 1735, during the reign of King Borommakot (1733-1758). About 300 Chinese tried to take over the Royal Palace while the King was in his summer capital of Lopburi. They failed but the palace was badly damaged and forty Chinese leaders were executed.

    In the biography of King Rama III (1824-1851) written by King Rama V, we find many reference to Chinese Secret Societies, called Tua hia at that time.

    In 1824, about 700 or 800 Teochiu Chinese constituted a secret society in Chanthaburi to oppose a Hokkien Chinese group. Fighting broke several times but the province governor succeeded in seizing the leaders and sending them to jail.

    In 1842, in Nakhon Chaisi, this time, in the west of Bangkok, three Ang-yi, each strong of about one thousand members, made some difficulties with the local authorities. The leaders were caught and sent to Bangkok, but their troops still robbed houses in the Province. A large police operation was necessary to subdue them.

    In 1845, along the western seaboard, Ang-yi indulged in piracy and robbed trader’s ships. Police forces were sent and many Chinese were put in jail.

    In 1847, fight arose in Samut Sakhon Province, South-west of Bangkok, between Ang-yi and Siamese troops because of some trafficking in illegal opium. Praya (noble rank granted by the king) Mahathep (noble name), one of the officials sent by Bangkok to restore order was killed. More troops had to be sent.

    Almost at the same time, according to the Royal chronicles, trouble burst at the east of Bangkok.

    On April 8, 1848 in Chachoengsao Province, members of an Ang-yi robbed a sugar factory and killed one of the owners, also a Chinese. They resisted the local authorities, killed the governor and took over the inner city on April 10.

    Two royal armies, one of them headed by famous general Chaopraya (noble rank granted by the king) Bodindecha (noble name), and more than ten days were necessary to subdue the revolt. Thousands of Chinese were killed in Chachoengsao and neighboring Chonburi Province by Thai and Lao troops sent by Bangkok and also by ordinary villagers.

    In 1867, one year before the end of the reign of King Rama IV, another major Ang-yi riot occurred in Phuket, probably related more with the situation in English Malaya. Two Ang-yi, the Ngi-hin and the Pun Thao Kong fought each other over a problem of water used to wash tin ore in the mines.

    Local Thai authorities sent nine Ang-yi leaders to Bangkok where they were asked to declare on oath while drinking holy water that they would not cause any more trouble to the kingdom.

    Under the reign of King Rama V (1868-1910), a number of riots and internal wars by Ang-yi burst from time to time. Very serious fights happened in Ranong and Phuket in 1876 and in Bangkok, in 1889.

    During 19-20 June 1889, in Bangkok Chinatown, workers belonging to a Teochiu Ang-yi, the Tua Kongsi fought against Hokkien workers from another Ang-yi, the Siw Li Kue. More than one thousand Chinese fought each other, twenty being killed and one hundred injured. The Thai army (infantrymen and sailors) had to step in to restore law and order. Eight hundred Ang-yi men were arrested, and only ten killed and twenty injured by the Thai soldiers.

    From then the Thai government decided to implement a harsher policy and officially declared Ang-yi illegal.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-01-jpg
    (The reign of King Rama V, Korat)


    According to Bevars D. Mabry, who wrote in 1979 a useful data paper (for Cornell University) on labor institutions in Thailand, explains that the Chinese immigrants in Thailand brought with them two types of organizations of some interest for the subject, the guilds and the secret societies.

    He estimated that they existed in Siam since the seventeenth century. They were organized along speech groups and one of their functions was to gain control over certain occupations. Membership was a prerequisite for employment.

    Many societies existed in Bangkok and, as each of them wanted to enlarge their sphere of influence, conflicts and fights were frequent.

    Ang-yi were not true labor organizations, but they controlled manpower, particularly in rice-mills and saw-mills, railroad works and provided support when strike broke.

    He also defined Ang-yi as:

    First type of trade union
    Welfare of association
    Political association
    Religion involved
    Economy involved
    Opium, illegal alcohol, gambling and prostitution involved

    In 1897, when registration became necessary for all Chinese organizations, some secret societies preferred to go underground. It is hard to believe that Ang-yi just disappeared in Siam during the reign of King Rama VI. What we can say, however, is that records no longer use the word but prefer other more neutral ones.

    William Skinner (‘Chinese society in Thailand. An analytical history’, 1957) admitted that Chinese secret societies were revived in 1938-39 to oppose the influence of the Japanese.

    Chinese riots happened twice in Bangkok Chinatown since 1925, once in September 1945, the other in July 1974.

    In 1945, riots broke out when Chinese leaders celebrating the victory over the Japanese hoisted up the Chinese and European flags while forgetting to hoist up the Thai flag.

    Since Chinese in Bangkok had kept some weapons used against the Japanese, there were sequences of true urban guerrilla. At least seven Chinese were killed (detail on page 26/632).

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-04-jpg


    More recently in July 1974, riots broke in Chinatown because of the violent arrest of a Chinese taxi driver by policemen. It resulted in 25 Chinese killed and about one hundred injured.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-05-jpg


    An interesting article in Thai published in 1990 (and published again in 1993) respected scholar Sisak Wanliphodom suggested that the Chao Pho or godfathers of the Eastern coast of Thailand were the descendants of the Ang-yi and the Nakleng-to, a Thai tradition of “big boss” or kindhearted outlaws.

    As many Chao Pho and local politicians are second-generation Chinese, whose fathers might have been Ang-yi members, it could be concluded that old fashioned Ang-yi have not completely disappeared but have flourished in some regions or have climbed the social ladder.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-02-jpg
    (Yi Ko Hong or Hong Techawanit or Praya Anuwat Rachaniyom, a famous leader of Ang-yi during the reign of King Rama V)

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 03-08-2021 at 08:58 AM.

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    I hope that 'arry does not come here to read about Chinese...

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    ^I am soo sooory offending our righteous member Pickled Mickled by my remark above.

    I forgot we do not like here a humour directed on some. We like only a "humour" with an explicit labelling directed on others...

  18. #1018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    I hope that 'arry does not come here to read about Chinese...
    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    ^I am soo sooory offending our righteous member Pickled Mickled by my remark above.

    I forgot we do not like here a humour directed on some. We like only a "humour" with an explicit labelling directed on others...
    JHC. Can you put a cork in it? Anytime someone comments or attempts to rebut what you have posted you start crying. When a lot of your recent posts are troll attempts this is going to happen. Just post and stop moaning and crying. Its getting quite tedious.

  19. #1019
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    JHC. Can you put a cork in it? Anytime someone comments or attempts to rebut what you have posted you start crying. When a lot of your recent posts are troll attempts this is going to happen. Just post and stop moaning and crying. Its getting quite tedious.
    Good to hear it from you...

  20. #1020
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    1936, Nang-Sao (= Miss) Special Dark Beer (L), Singha Lager Beer (R), products of Boon Rawd Brewery (the other shown only in the illustration ad. was 'Wow Tong (= Golden kite))

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1936nang-sao-special-dark-beer-l

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1936nang-sao-special-dark-beer-l

  21. #1021
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    1959, Chiengrai

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-1959chir-jpg


    1969, Pattani

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-1969pattani-jpg


    1972, Chiengmai

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-1972chim-jpg

  22. #1022
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    1966

    Sathorn Tai

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1966sathorntai-jpg


    Sukhumvit

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1966sukhum-jpg

  23. #1023
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    I lived in both those hotels for extended periods in the 70s. Hope you are not stalking me.

  24. #1024
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shy Guava View Post
    I lived in both those hotels for extended periods in the 70s. Hope you are not stalking me.

    To tell the truth, you were the reason that I posted these hotels. Wondering ... "Did he stay there too?".

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    Related to the story on page 18/450, Pra Nakhon Kheeree is a historical park in Petchaburi Province siting on a hill overlooking the province area.

    Back then, this complex was built as a summer Palace by King Mongkut (King Rama IV; 1804-1868). It was finished in 1860.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-03-01-jpg


    Since it was a Summer Palace, the King and his family plus the entourage did not stay regularly.
    Sometimes, they just visited only once a year. Sometimes, it was longer than that.

    However, during their absence, the Palace had to be taken care of all the time. These chores were assigned to the trusted local officials.

    When the royal visit came, it was a huge gathering. The local officials had to provide enough men to take care of each of the royalty starting from the king himself, the members of his family and more.

    Those men’s jobs varied according to whom they were serving but it was labor jobs all the same.
    Mostly it concerned with “carrying stuff” up the hills on various kinds of means such as palanquins for carrying people and etc. Apart from those, for young royalty, they could become horses for them to ride up and down the hills. Nonetheless, it was considered fun time for them.

    These people were not Siamese but a tribe called Thai Song Dum or Lao Song. It was a group of minority people from Dien Bien Phu near the borderline between North Vietnam and Laos.

    They have migrated or taken during the wars and settled down in Siam for more than 200 years, since the reigns of King Rama I through King Rama III’s.

    Thai Song Dum or Lao Song in Petchaburi lived under the land of Siam with modesty and never caused any troubles. They seemed to be satisfied with the new territory. The significant characteristic of this tribe being honesty and loyalty was always admired by all classes of royalty.

    So, King Rama IV (and then King Rama V, his son) always trusted them with such chores including general security guards and called them ‘Dek Cha’.

    The tribe has its own culture and traditions, e.g. wearing all black with unique style. In terms of communication, they have their own language and also a writing system of their own.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-03-02-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-03-03-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 04-08-2021 at 02:46 PM.

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