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  1. #1
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    QAnon right wing nutters

    These nutters are spreading and just the other day a mob boss in New York was murdered by a Q conspiracy theorist. (He will not live long in prison )



    This is a movement that people like Tex, Boon and definitely Earl buy into when your read their posts. Scary how easy people are corralled into these false realities.

    Bye bye to this guy when he goes to prison...



    Gambino Mob Boss Shooting Suspect Was ‘Radicalized’ by QAnon, Far Right, Even Trump, Lawyer Says

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/anthon...mp-lawyer-says

  2. #2
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    well he did the world a favor, and double bonus, he goes to jail

    so what's your point again?

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat Boon Mee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly View Post

    so what's your point again?

  4. #4
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    Failed Prophecies Won’t Stop Trump’s True Believers

    This for those of us who actually read...

    The mysterious figure called “Q” or “QAnon” first appeared online on Oct. 28, 2017, with a post on the far-right /pol/ message board of 4chan that they had inside information about a secret plot being hatched by the Trump administration. According to Q, the forces of righteousness were about to pounce on the “deep state,” an entrenched conspiracy that supposedly also encompassed a vast array of well-known liberal names, including Hillary and Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, John Podesta, and George Soros. They were said to be engaged not only in attempting to foil President Donald Trump’s policies but also in operating a global pedophilia ring that would dwarf Pizzagate. Q’s post might have disappeared among thousands of other obscure messages had it not been picked up and promoted by two of the website’s moderators and a YouTube video producer who together brought it to a larger audience of conspiracy buffs and wider web platforms. As Q continued to post, they made a series of dramatic predictions: Trump would deliver a coup against the deep state during which no fewer than 25,000 sealed indictments would be opened. In a message on Nov. 1, 2017, Q alerted followers that the opening of these indictments would cause widespread civil disorder. Therefore, because of the riots caused by the imminent arrest of “senior public officials,” the president was about to declare “a state of temporary military control” within “the next several days.”

    The problem with Q’s predictions was not only the specificity of the events themselves but that they were dated, suggesting a series of extraordinary developments within the first few days of November. Of course, nothing of the sort actually happened, although Q continued to post up until October 2018. That has left the QAnon movement with a classic dilemma of apocalyptic movements: What do you do when prophecy fails?

    It might seem strange to call an online conspiracy theory an apocalyptic movement. But at the heart of such beliefs, from those who expected the Second Coming in 19th-century America to their counterparts in the Taiping Rebellion across the Pacific, is the idea of revelation. Believers are offered some special insight into the future and the knowledge that a great change is coming. That’s part of what made QAnon so appealing—and left them reaching for the same toolbox that millenarians do when the apocalypse is delayed.

    That has left the Q believers with a dilemma. We don’t know just how many of them there are, although they’ve begun to turn out at Trump rallies wearing Q T-shirts. But this is a subculture, not a formal organization, so their numbers are unknown. However many there are, those attracted to Q’s pronouncements have found themselves facing the same problem that has confronted others dealing with failed prophecies and predictions: cognitive dissonance.

    Cognitive dissonance occurs when individuals are pulled in opposite directions by their beliefs on the one hand and their real-world experience on the other. The conflict between them creates psychological pressure, which people seek to reduce. This situation has been faced many times before, by people who have made huge personal investments in belief systems that claimed some great change would take place at a given time but who were then left psychologically stranded when the change did not take place. This happened, for example, in religious movements that predicted the Second Coming, as the Millerites did in 1843-1844, or in the case of the widely publicized Mayan prophecy in December 2012.

    The general pattern with cognitive dissonance situations is that the less heavily invested will eventually drop away. Some who are relatively heavily committed may find similar affiliations to which they can transfer their loyalties. But a core group will remain, even in the face of predictions or prophecies that simply didn’t happen. That includes at least some of the QAnon believers who have remained loyal. What keeps them there?

    In the first place, no one who has made a heavy commitment to any belief likes to admit that they have made a mistake. In addition, the belief is likely to be one around which they have structured their view of the world. That certainly was the case with QAnon’s predictions. This was to be the final battle between the virtuous forces of Trump and his allies against the quintessential evil of the deep state, after whose defeat some final quasi-paradise would presumably emerge. When that kind of prediction goes wrong, it carries a lot of potential psychological damage with it.

    Consequently, one way of dealing with the dissonance is to try to keep the belief even in the face of a world that denies that the belief had any validity. There are two ways of dealing with this: One is to tinker with the timing of the prediction; the other is to reinterpret the prediction itself. Believers in Q have done both.

    QAnon’s ideas actually seem to have spread in December 2017 and January 2018, after the failed predictions had passed, perhaps partially due to that fact that by then Q’s ideas had been picked up and spread by the conspiracy-monger Alex Jones. The surge of interest in Q in the months following the nonfulfillment of the November 2017 prediction indicates that believers were willing to cut Q some slack, felt the November prediction might only have been approximate, or thought it might refer to an entire period rather than some specific day.

    In any case, unlike some previous times of prophetic disappointment, there was no single, dramatic moment of despair. Nonetheless, as time passed, it became clear that the anti-deep state coup had not taken place. Consequently, believers had to keep pushing it further and further into the future if they were to continue crediting Q’s pronouncements. Q justified the delay by reminding adherents that years of corruption made law enforcement agencies inefficient and slow-moving, so the wave of promised arrests would come more slowly than many thought. That’s a recognizable strategy of failed millenarianism; the event has been delayed because the world was too corrupt for redemption yet.

    The other strategy for coping with dissonance is to reinterpret the prediction so that it means something either less concrete or less imminent. Q made this easy because there are a great many Q postings, and many of them are cryptic. Q referred to them as “crumbs,” bits of intelligence dribbled out in small portions rather than presented in logical, systematic presentations. As a result, believers are left with a body of sometimes obscure texts that must be explicated in the light of events. What was once a subculture of eager expectation becomes one of continual reinterpretation.
    The saga of Q and their faithful band of believers tells us something not only about the willingness of people to stay loyal to their beliefs even in the face of a world that contradicts them. It also suggests the strength of the appetite for inside information that will assure people that they alone know how the world really works, especially knowledge about ultimate events concerning the struggle between good and evil. In that sense, the ideas that attracted Q’s followers were merely the secular counterpart of the millenarian religions that have loomed so large up to our own day. And where history is seen as culminating in a final struggle between good and evil, conspiracy theories are often not far behind.

    Q claimed not only to have knowledge of a deep state conspiracy but to know how its supposedly malevolent designs were going to be defeated. In a culture already saturated with beliefs about plots and cabals—as contemporary America is—these claims were enormously enticing, despite the total absence of external evidence to support them. As Trump’s own rhetoric has become increasingly inflammatory and apocalyptic, it converges with the ideas of Q and their followers so that what was once the world of the fringe now meets the mainstream. Indeed, some QAnon supporters believe that Q is Trump—the president and the prophet combined. If there is any lesson to be taken from this bizarre episode, it is that, in the age of Trump, no claim seems too preposterous to find an audience and that, in the age of the internet and social media, these beliefs and those willing to accept them are only too easy to bring together.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2018/11/08...rue-believers/

  5. #5
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    Why some baby boomers are eating up the QAnon conspiracy



    QAnon — an all-encompassing right-wing conspiracy theory about everything from the JFK assassination to pedophile rings based on the vague writings of an anonymous internet poster — has now fully broken into the mainstream, thanks mostly to the alarming number of Trump supporters who showed up to the President’s most recent rallies decked out in “Q” gear.
    So what's QAnon?

    The QAnon conspiracy theory revolves around an anonymous internet poster going by the name "Q." This Q (who may be more than one person!) claims to be a high-ranking government official, supposedly with Q clearance, which would theoretically give them access to material classified as top secret. Q's posts are usually vague on specifics, but the general narrative is that everything President Trump does is part of a secret mission to take down a global pedophile ring, expose the deep state, and who knows what else.

    The QAnon conspiracy theory rolls other new conspiracy theories into it on a regular basis. For example: JFK Jr., who was killed in a plane crash in 1999, never died. In fact, he may be Q himself, according to one of the latest QAnon updates.

    Internet conspiracy theories have existed long before QAnon, of course. Pizzagate, a fake news story that ended up having real-world consequences, is a well-known example. But in describing how QAnon is different, NBC’s Ben Collins probably put it best: QAnon is "Pizzagate on bath salts."

    QAnon continues to grow legs due to a number of factors, and there’s enough blame to go around. There’s our president, Donald Trump, who himself has long dabbled in conspiracy theories. There are platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, where conspiracies get shared and whose founders “turn a blind eye to the dangers of bullshit.”

    How QAnon began


    But another major factor, one that especially aided in providing “QAnon” an air of legitimacy, is a lack of understanding as to how the internet works when it comes to those who believe in it.

    Those who have really taken to QAnon are not your typical internet conspiracy theorists. The Daily Beast’s Will Sommers has been following the conspiracy theory since its beginnings in October 2017, when Q first started posting in reference to Trump's seemingly random, off-the-cuff remark to the press about a "calm before the storm" while taking a photo with military leaders.

    While regulars in the conspiracy theory world, like recently de-platformed Alex Jones, have come out against the QAnon conspiracy, saying they don't believe Q is who he says he is, Sommers points out how QAnon is extremely popular among Trump-loving baby boomers. QAnon followers skew shockingly old for a conspiracy theory that began on 4chan, the infamous online forum known mostly for its shitposting teens and long history of supporting internet hoaxes.

    The Pew Research Center recently found that more than 60 percent of people between the ages of 50 and 65 are now on at least one social network. And, according to some studies, baby boomers, typically defined as those born between 1946 and 1964, now spend even more time online than millennials.

    Most revealing, though, is what studies have found when it comes to how baby boomers use the internet and social media. Boomers take action based on what they see and read online. They are 19 percent more likely to share content than any other generation, especially when it comes to political content. While boomers are most likely to seek out more information on something they come across on the internet, a study found that only 10 percent of them share information with the intent of educating their online audience. Boomers are opinionated and share content as long as it's meaningful to them.

    However, boomers, a majority of which voted for Donald Trump, didn't grow up with the internet, and didn't develop their relationship with technology in the same was as subsequent generations. They're soaking up the latest tech but they may not necessarily be as skeptical of less mainstream platforms like 4chan and 8chan (another, even fringier platform where Q now posts his/her/their latest updates), places where trolls reign supreme and people often fabricate events out of thin air just to get a rise out of others. Boomers are looking for political content to share, and these forums have plenty to give. Whether or not it's factual often takes a backseat to whether or not it's provocative.

    The web unravels

    One of the early viral QAnon moments is a perfect showcase of how the conspiracy is fueled by boomers who may be confused by how these tech platforms work. Screenshots like this one, which spread in November of last year, reinforce the idea among the less tech-savvy that Q is connected to Trump like Q says.

    This mash-up of two messages makes up looks like QAnon posted a message with the “+++,” and Trump tweeted the same symbols a few minutes later. Interpreted by QAnon believers, this is Trump’s wink and a nod to Q and their movement.

    However, if you examine the original posts, it becomes clear that this is wildly misleading. The time zones don't sync up.

    Twitter reflects the timezone of your location if you’re logged in to your account. 4Chan time is eastern standard time. On November 6, 2017 at 5:07 p.m. Eastern, Q posts on 4Chan:
    Nothing is random.
    Everything has meaning.
    +++
    Q

    Reflected in the same timezone, Trump’s “+++” tweet from that day was actually posted at 4:15 p.m. Eastern — almost a full hour before Q’s. Q was referencing Trump after the fact, which literally anyone can do.




    There are other moments like this screenshot where Q will quote a post of his from before a Trump tweet, then repost it after a Trump tweet — with the text displaying the original posts timestamp — quoting the President once again, leading some to believe Trump quoted Q in verbatim while it was actually the opposite.


    Most people with even a tiny bit of tech savviness aren't falling for this stuff. They get how these sites work. But for those who don't, like some boomers, it can look like Q actually does have the inside scoop about what Trump, their guy, is about to do before he does it.

    Prior to the QAnon conspiracy blowing up recently, there weren't very many trusted sources where one could go to find out more about it, let alone debunking this nonsense. For those attempting due diligence, a Google search to find more about QAnon would just return unreliable blogs and conspiracy websites promoting the theory as legitimate, leading the reader deeper down the rabbit hole.

    However, with the conversation around QAnon reaching the mainstream, that's changing. But the conspiracy probably isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. It’ll approach a year of festering online this October. Like with most conspiracy theorists when they fall in this deep, you probably won’t be able to convince a QAnon believer with debunks, no matter how factual.

    But you can understand why this is happening. And maybe, if your mom and dad are starting to spend more and more time online, keep them far away from the QAnon conspiracy.

    https://mashable.com/article/qanon-c...boomers-4chan/
    Last edited by bsnub; 31-03-2019 at 07:33 PM.

  6. #6
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Ya know Snubs, This just shows how the states (and the world in many cases) is LOADED with lemmings and whack jobs. Its amazing how many can become brainwashed so quickly. People are becoming so anti social as they sit and dive deep into the internet and then start to believe all they read from nutters that know that others will.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    Ya know Snubs, This just shows how the states (and the world in many cases) is LOADED with lemmings and whack jobs.
    It really is sad. I love this country but I am seeing it be systematically destroyed by the oligarchs that control all the little right wing minds.

    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    Its amazing how many can become brainwashed so quickly.
    It has been happening for a long time. Boon has been brainwashed and vacant of intellectual discourse for over a decade.

    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    People are becoming so anti social as they sit and dive deep into the internet and then start to believe all they read from nutters that know that others will.
    I am with you. I was out at the pub tonight and came home to post this. People like Tex and Boon rot in their festering holes.

  8. #8
    CCBW JPPR2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    It really is sad. I love this country but I am seeing it be systematically destroyed by the oligarchs that control all the little right wing minds.
    It is sad. I love America. It used to be a place I was proud of. Current administration has really brought a new low to our country. There is not much I can say that is GREAT.

    Boon and Tex are old guys stuck in a vacuum. Soon they will suffocate. Clearly they are already exhibiting signs of no oxygen...

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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    It is sad. I love America. It used to be a place I was proud of. Current administration has really brought a new low to our country. There is not much I can say that is GREAT.

    Boon and Tex are old guys stuck in a vacuum. Soon they will suffocate. Clearly they are already exhibiting signs of no oxygen...
    Truth!

  10. #10
    Thailand Expat Texpat's Avatar
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    Nutters indeed, Buns. Got yer apocalypse bunker stocked?

    SELL SELL SELL

    Buy Dried beans, dehydrated turnips and ammo. All the ammo you kin git.

  11. #11
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    QAnon conspiracy theorists turned out in force at Trump's Michigan rally as he hailed victory over 'deep state'




    Supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theory were out in force at President Donald Trump's rally in Michigan on Thursday, where the president hailed victory over a "deep state" of officials he claims is out to topple him from power.

    Footage taken at the rally in Grand Rapids — where Trump claimed that Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report exonerated him from accusations of collusion— showed thousands of supporters lining up to get into the event, many wearing clothing emblazoned with "Q" and shouting QAnon slogans.

    NBC News reporter Ben Collins, who posted the video, tweeted: "I've been covering Qanon for a year, and the amount of pro-Q people in this video from yesterday's Trump rally line in Grand Rapids is absolutely shocking."

    In a picture of the rally tweeted by Trump himself, one supporter appears to hold aloft a "Q" sign amid a sea of signs reading "jobs."

    On social media, supporters of the conspiracy posted pictures of themselves at the event, while others posted images showing themselves tuning in to watch the rally from home.

    George Conway, a Republican attorney and prominent Trump critic, tweeted that the number of QAnon adherents attending the Grand Rapids rally was "jaw-dropping."

    https://www.businessinsider.com/qano...p-state-2019-3

  12. #12
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    The world seems to be full of conspiracy theorists. There is not one major event where someone doesn't have an alternative theory. There are still many who are convinced the moon landing was a hoax. Unfortunately this has real world consequences as these conspiracy theorists attack real world problems such as global warming. I once dated a young Christian woman who was a creationist and believed the world was 5,000 years old and that all scientists were in a world conspiracy to deny the truth. Needless to say the first date was the last, but it did prove to me at a relatively early age how people can be so devoid of any logical thought, even on the most scientifically provable subjects.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat Texpat's Avatar
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    Nutjob conspiracy theorists attack real world problems, like the conspiracies I choose to believe in, and I'm not going to stand for it!


  14. #14
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    Unfortunately this has real world consequences as these conspiracy theorists attack real world problems such as global warming
    This.

  15. #15
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    A good example is the outbreaks of measles in the U.S. thanks to those antivaxer lunatics.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat Texpat's Avatar
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    Or these Luddites:

    Oct 2018
    A massive measles outbreak is currently spreading through Europe — the largest such outbreak the continent has ever seen
    https://www.livescience.com/63951-an...ak-europe.html

    Or this shitshow:

    NSW is a hotspot for anti-vaccination, with about a third of children unvaccinated, compared with a national average of just over 5 per cent.
    https://www.vaccineconfidence.org/au...tion-hot-spot/

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    Exactly.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPPR2 View Post
    Ya know Snubs, This just shows how the states (and the world in many cases) is LOADED with lemmings and whack jobs. Its amazing how many can become brainwashed so quickly. People are becoming so anti social as they sit and dive deep into the internet and then start to believe all they read from nutters that know that others will.
    ...sorry for the thread hijack: this is related...Alex Jones is only one of the many alt-right provocateurs who deliberately mislead (rather simple-minded) people by making up inflammatory headlines, misquoting legitimate news sources, denigrating science- and fact-based reporting, etc...www.gatewaypundit.com comes to mind...finally, a financial comeuppance for this miscreant:

    Alex Jones Loses Sandy Hook Court Appeal, Must Now Pay Nearly $150,000 In Legal Fees

    Sebastian Murdock
    HuffPostMarch 27, 2020, 3:05 AM GMT+7


    Alex Jones Loses Sandy Hook Court Appeal, Must Now Pay Nearly $150,000 In Legal FeesAlex Jones, a conspiracy theorist and repeated loser of court battles, was ordered Wednesday to pay more than $20,000 in attorney fees after losing another appeal in a defamation case related to the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. He now owes nearly $150,000 in legal fees before he even faces a jury.

    The Texas Court of Appeals sided with Sandy Hook father Neil Heslin, who for years has been attacked by conspiracy theorists who falsely claim the school shooting in which 20 children and six adults were killed never happened.

    Heslin’s lawsuit accuses Jones and his website, Infowars, of defamation after Jones claimed the parents of the dead children were “crisis actors” who helped stage the shooting. Jones is now being sued by nine family members of people who died in the shooting.

    Jones’ most recent appeal to dismiss Heslin’s lawsuit was found to be “frivolous,” the court ruled Wednesday. Jones was ordered to pay $22,250 in attorney fees.
    Jones was also ordered to pay approximately $25,000 in October after a court sanctioned him. And in December, he was ordered to pay $100,000 in legal fees after a Texas judge ruled his defense team “intentionally disregarded” an earlier order to produce witnesses.

    Attorney Mark Bankston, who is representing Heslin and other families suing Jones, told HuffPost in a statement that the latest victory for his client spells the end for Jones.

    “It is rare to see a legal defense so incompetent and disrespectful to the rule of law that it causes a defendant to rack up $150,000 in fines during preliminary motions before even reaching trial,” Bankston said. “These fines are only the beginning. A far greater reckoning awaits Mr. Jones.”
    Former allies have turned against Jones during his legal battle. Rob Jacobson, a former Infowars editor, testified in a deposition that staff laughed at him when he warned them against spreading lies about Sandy Hook.

    “I told [Jones] straight to his face: ‘They’re going to come after you for Sandy Hook. This is really bad,’” Jacobson said. “He just stared at me like a deer in the headlights, he had nothing to say. And we just went on our way.”

    Paul Watson, Jones’ longtime friend and a contributor to Infowars, testified in December that he also warned Jones to leave the parents alone, but was largely ignored.

    Jones was most recently in the news after he was caught peddling a toothpaste he falsely claimed could kill the deadly coronavirus.
    Last edited by tomcat; 27-03-2020 at 02:57 PM.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Paul Watson, Jones’ longtime friend
    Have you heard that name before Klondyke?

  20. #20
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    Scum like this really should be locked away.

    Conspiracy theorist and talk radio host Alex Jones is using public fears over the coronavirus outbreak to help peddle toothpaste that he falsely claims can kill the virus. Jones told listeners on his “Infowars” program Tuesday that silver-infused toothpaste being sold on his website has been verified by federal officials as a coronavirus killer, despite the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention saying otherwise.

    “The patented nanosilver we have, the Pentagon has come out and documented and Homeland Security has said this stuff kills the whole SARS-corona family at point-blank range,” he said. “They’re still discounted despite all the hell breaking loose.”

  21. #21
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    That's a bit harsh...

    He should be infected with COVID-19 and then forced to treat it only with his magic toothpaste.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    That's a bit harsh...

    He should be infected with COVID-19 and then forced to treat it only with his magic toothpaste.
    That works.

  23. #23
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    The world seems to be full of conspiracy theorists.
    Could there be a link between them and a world that is ruled by corrupt government, that constantly lie, where is the cut off point, up to each individual to decide, the sheep will always follow!
    If you consider the world a fair and just place for all, there is obviously no need to think at all

  24. #24
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo
    Could there be a link between them and
    ...a pattern of cognitive bias in seeing patterns where there are none and discounting or distorting any evidence that doesn't fit with this and an overarching cognitive error of attribution and psychological protection against accepting that bad shit just happens sometimes and a lack of agency, whilst at times scary, is just a normal part of the human condition?

    Yes. Indubitably.

  25. #25
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo View Post
    A good example is the outbreaks of measles in the U.S. thanks to those antivaxer lunatics.
    Again could this be linked to the distrust of "Big Pharma" or should we blindly trust them and their PR, never mind if it goes wrong can always apply to National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program | Official web site of the U.S. Health Resources & Services Administration for compensation, surprising with them being so safe that their is a need to set up a dedicated compensation scheme, perhaps "Big Pharma" chips in a few $ from their highly profitable vaccine sales?

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