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  1. #5101
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Mac Davis, Singer, Actor and TV Variety Show Host, Dies at 78

    Mac Davis (b. 1942- ) performs 70's classic "Baby Dont Get Hooked On Me" - YouTube

    Snip
    Davis became known as the songwriter behind the Elvis Presley hits “In the Ghetto,” “A Little Less Conversation” and “Memories” before reaching No. 1 himself on the Billboard Hot 100 with “Baby, Don’t Get Hooked on Me” in 1971. He soon parlayed his pop success into a career based more in country music. Davis was named entertainer of the year at the Academy of Country Music Awards in 1974 and was nominated for that same title the same year by the Country Music Association.


    Davis’ sex appeal and easy charm made him a favorite on the talk show circuit, and he was rewarded with his own NBC variety series, “The Mac Davis Show,” from 1974-76, followed by annual network Christmas specials that spanned well into the ’80s. He even had a brief span as a leading man in feature films, peaking right out of the gate as Nick Nolte’s fellow leading man in the 1979 football drama “North Dallas Forty.”

    MORE Mac Davis Dead: Country Singer, Actor and TV Host Was 78 - VarietyMac Davis (b. 1942- ) performs 70's classic "Baby Dont Get Hooked On Me" - YouTube

  2. #5102
    Thailand Expat
    Mendip's Avatar
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    Maybe not that famous internationally... but Z Cars is one of my earliest television memories...

    Frank Windsor: Z Cars actor dies at 92





    Actor Frank Windsor, known for his roles in TV dramas Z Cars, Softly Softly, Casualty and Peak Practice, has died at the age of 92.

    Windsor played Det Sgt John Watt in pioneering police show Z Cars in the 1960s, and its spin-off Softly Softly.

    He remained a familiar face with roles in shows like Doctor Who, Flying Lady and Middlemen, and appeared as Kenneth in Casualty from 2003 - 2004.

    His agent said he died peacefully at home in London on Wednesday.

    Frank Windsor: Z Cars actor dies at 92 - BBC News
    Last edited by Mendip; 03-10-2020 at 02:17 AM.

  3. #5103
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    French-Japanese designer Kenzo Takada dies from COVID-19

    Kenzo Takada, the iconic French-Japanese fashion designer famed for his jungle-infused designs and free-spirited aesthetic that channeled global travel, has died. He was 81.


    The family said in a statement to French media Sunday that Takada died from complications from COVID-19 in a hospital in Neuilly-sur-Seine, near Paris. A public relations officer for Kenzo’s brand confirmed that Takada died, but didn’t give a cause of death.


    “It is with immense sadness that KENZO has learned of the passing of our founder,” the fashion house said in a statement. “For half a century, Mr. Takada has been an emblematic personality in the fashion industry — always infusing creativity and color into the world.”


    Takada’s death came at the tail end of Paris Fashion Week, whose nine-day calendar is undertaking an unusual fashion season for spring-summer 2021 because of the coronavirus pandemic. It was only days ago that the Kenzo fashion house unveiled its bee-themed collection here.


    Though Takada had been retired from his house since 1999 to pursue a career in art, Kenzo remains one of the most respected fixtures of high Paris fashion. Since 1993, the Kenzo brand has been owned by the French luxury goods company LVMH.


    “His amazing energy, kindness, talent and smile were contagious,” said Kenzo artistic director Felipe Oliveira Baptista, who unveiled the bee-themed collection to fashion editors Wednesday. “His kindred spirit will live forever.”


    Kenzo’s styles used bold color, clashing prints and were inspired by travels all over the world.


    “Kenzo Takada has, from the 1970s, infused into fashion a tone of poetic lightness and sweet freedom which inspired many designers after him,” said Bernard Arnault, chairman and chief executive of LVMH.


    Takada was born on Feb. 27, 1939, in Himeji, in the Hyogo Prefecture in Japan to hoteliers, but after reading his sisters’ fashion magazines his love of fashion began.


    Studying at the Bunka College of Fashion in Tokyo, Kenzo Takada had a brief stint working in Japan, before relocating to Paris in 1965, to work as a freelance designer.


    In Paris, he took over a boutique in 1970 and crystallized his future ready-to-wear aesthetic inspired in its decoration by the jungle scenes of painter Henri Rousseau, which he merged with Asian styles. It became influential.


    But it was lowly beginnings: Takada’s first collection at the store called was made entirely out of cotton because he had little money. But the clothes spoke for themselves and a model of his was put on the cover of Elle magazine. A short time after, pioneering shoulder forms, large armholes, dungarees, smock tent dresses, innovative shoulder shapes, and his store was featured in US Vogue. Kenzo showed collections in New York and Tokyo in 1971.


    Yves Saint Laurent was an important inspiration, in his work, Takada has said. Takada shared Saint Laurent’s penchant for theatrics. in 1978 and 1979, he showed in a circus tent, and it featured himself riding an elephant, and performers rode horses wearing see-through uniforms.


    Takada’s love of travel and use of ethnic influences were strong features in his three decades atop his house.


    His contribution to style was significant. He championed a youthful aesthetic and unstructured form, and did away with zippers to liberate silhouettes. His signatures were of wider sleeves and arm holes, that harked to historic styles in his home continent of Asia.

    French-Japanese designer Kenzo Takada dies from COVID-19 | Thai PBS World : The latest Thai news in English, News Headlines, World News and News Broadcasts in both Thai and English. We bring Thailand to the world

  4. #5104
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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  5. #5105
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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  6. #5106
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    They all look the same to you, harry?

  7. #5107
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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  8. #5108
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    They all look the same to you, harry?
    Haha!

    Mea Culpa.



    ( I didn't realise Jimmy Cliff covered it).

  9. #5109
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    RIP Mr. Trink. You were as much a source of information as you were entertainment.

    Post legend Bernard Trink dies at 89

    The RIP Famous Person Thread-c1_1999947-jpg

    Bernard Trink, one of the most memorable figures in the long history of the Bangkok Post, has passed away at the age of 89.


    He had been ill and was being treated at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, where he died of a blood infection on Tuesday night, said his wife Aree Trink.


    He is survived by his wife and two children, a son and daughter. His cremation will be held at Sala 5, Wat That Thong, at 2pm on Sunday.


    Trink was best known for his Nite Owl column, a freewheeling weekly chronicle of the seamier side of the city’s vibrant nightlife scene. The column had a devoted following, mainly among expatriates, who voiced strong reactions pro and con. But even his most ardent detractors never missed reading it.


    When he wasn’t combing local nightlife haunts for material, Trink had a prolific sideline as a book reviewer for the Post, specialising in thrillers and spy tales. Every one was composed on a manual typewriter, at which he pecked away with two fingers.


    Born in New York in 1931, Trink came to Bangkok in the mid-1960s and taught English at various universities before taking over the “Nite Owl” column in 1966 at the now defunct Bangkok World, an evening English-language newspaper.

    For the next 37 years, Trink chronicled the comings and going of those who frequented or worked in the city’s go-go bars, nightclubs, pubs and massage parlours.


    Blunt and not given to political correctness, he never ceased to give readers something to talk about. If the criticism bothered him, he never let on, ending every Nite Owl installment with the tagline: “But I don’t give a hoot!”


    Trink first came to Asia during his military service in the Korean War in the early 1950s. He later worked as a journalist in India, Hong Kong and Japan before arriving in Bangkok.


    “Nite Owl” began life in the World as a three-page illustrated section that appeared every Friday afternoon. When the newspaper was bought out and shut down by the Post in the mid-1980s, the column shrank to one page and no longer featured racy photographs of local “demimondaines” — Trink's signature term for the young women he came across on his rounds.


    When he made those rounds — trousers hiked up almost to his chest, a loud shirt buttoned to the neck and an oversized amulet — he was hard to miss. Anyone who frequented the likes of Patpong, Nana Plaza and Soi Cowboy knew who he was.


    Another Trink contribution to the local lingo was “TIT” — “This is Thailand” — which expats still use to explain away anything that baffles them about the country.


    Over time, the material grew more tame, but some of the views he expressed caused discomfort among higher-ups at the Post, who contemplated stopping it in the late 1990s. His fans mounted a letter-writing campaign and the column was saved, but further reduced to half a page.


    While Trink spoke out for women’s rights, he viewed most bar girls as rapacious and untrustworthy, and warned foreign men about becoming romantically involved with them. Most controversially, his belief that HIV did not lead to Aids attracted considerable criticism and was regular fodder for letters in Postbag.


    The end of “Nite Owl” finally came in December 2003, with no announcement or farewell party. But Trink continued to come to the newsroom once a week to write his book reviews. The last one appeared earlier this year.


    “I didn’t want to retire,” he told writer Barbara Woolsey in a 2014
    profile in Coconuts Bangkok. “Years passed, and I reached an age where I should retire. But why retire? I didn’t save any money. And there’s nothing out there I enjoy more than what I’m doing here, writing.”

    Post legend Bernard Trink dies at 89
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails The RIP Famous Person Thread-c1_1999947-jpg  

  10. #5110
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    ^Met him several times back in the '70's...interesting, albeit strange, guy.

  11. #5111
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    ^Any of the old timers remember "The Flash" from the same era?

  12. #5112
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    I remember Trink, though I didn’t follow him. Flash must have been before my time.

    I do remember Mrs. Edith Clampton, who wrote letters to the editor and was always a hoot. She wrote in to complain once about how rude the new Pizza Hut motorbike vendors were. She had chased several down the street to buy a slice but they never stopped.

  13. #5113
    Lone Monarchist
    Backspin's Avatar
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    The good ol sleaze bag prostitute reviewer.

  14. #5114
    Head Skivvie Stacker Storekeeper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    RIP Mr. Trink. You were as much a source of information as you were entertainment.

    Post legend Bernard Trink dies at 89
    Interesting. The profiles in Coconuts Bangkok link inside that article eventually leads to a “still slammed on message boards” link that leads to this:

    Bernard Trink - Why aint he dead yet?

  15. #5115
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    I remember Trink, though I didn’t follow him. Flash must have been before my time.

    I do remember Mrs. Edith Clampton, who wrote letters to the editor and was always a hoot. She wrote in to complain once about how rude the new Pizza Hut motorbike vendors were. She had chased several down the street to buy a slice but they never stopped.
    Every time I glance at Postbag these days there seems to be a letter from one Eric Bahrt, who seems to be Thailand's whinging curtain twitcher from hell.

    The incessantly dull tone of his writing and material is better suited to the Worthing Evening Argus rather than an international newspaper.

  16. #5116
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Rhonda Fleming, film star of ’40s and ’50s, dies at 97



    The RIP Famous Person Thread-rhonda-fleming-2-jpg

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Actress Rhonda Fleming, the fiery redhead who appeared with Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Charlton Heston, Ronald Reagan and other film stars of the 1940s and 1950s, has died. She was 97.

    Fleming’s assistant Carla Sapon told The New York Times that Fleming died Wednesday in Santa Monica, California.

    From her first film in color, “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court ” (1949) with Bing Crosby, Fleming became immensely popular with producers because of her vivid hues. It was an attraction she would later regret.

    “Suddenly my green eyes were green. My red hair was flaming red. My skin was porcelain white,” Fleming remarked in a 1990 interview. “There was suddenly all this attention on how I looked rather than the roles I was playing.


    “I’d been painted into a corner by the studios, who never wanted more from me than my looking good and waltzing through a parade of films like ‘The Redhead and the Cowboy.’ ”


    Before Reagan entered politics, the actress co-starred with him in “Hong Kong,” “Tropic Zone,” “The Last Outpost” and “Tennessee’s Partner.”


    “He surprised everyone because he never looked in a mirror,” she once said of Reagan. “How many actors can you say that about?”

    Fleming possessed a fine singing voice, and later in her career sang onstage in Las Vegas and in a touring act.


    In the big-studio era, many new personalities were publicized as having been discovered in quirky ways: Kim Novak while riding a bicycle past an agent’s office, Lana Turner spotted in a malt shop.


    In Fleming’s case, young Marilyn Louis was reported to have been headed to class at Beverly Hills High School when a man followed her in a big black car and told her, “You ought to be in pictures.” She eluded him, but he turned up at her home and offered to be her agent.


    Legend or not, at 19 Louis was awarded a six-month contract at the studio of David O. Selznick and a new name: Rhonda Fleming. She played a bit part in the 1944 wartime drama “Since You Went Away,” and then Alfred Hitchcock chose her to play a nymphomaniac in “Spellbound,” starring Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck.


    “I rushed home, and my mother and I looked up ‘nymphomaniac’ in the dictionary,” she recalled. “We were both shocked.”


    “Spellbound” led to another suspense film, “The Spiral Staircase,” in which she was strangled by the villain, George Brent. With Selznick concentrating on the career of his wife, Jennifer Jones, he lost interest in his contract players, and Fleming left the studio to freelance.


    Her next films: “Abilene Town,” a Randolph Scott Western; “Out of the Past,” a film noir with Robert Mitchum; and “Adventure Island,” a tropics thriller starring Rory Calhoun.

    She won a role in “A Connecticut Yankee,” a Crosby musical based on the Mark Twain story, after Deanna Durbin dropped out to retire to France. Crosby was so impressed that he recommended her to Bob Hope, with whom she starred in “The Great Lover.”


    Ironically, the Crosby/Hope films that established her as a luminary proved to be ones she was never able to top. She remained a star for 15 years, but except for the Lancaster-Douglas “Gunfight at the OK Corral,” most of her performances came in B pictures that exploited her looks.


    “I made the mistake of doing lesser films for good money,” she reflected in a 1976 interview. “I was hot — they all wanted me — but I didn’t have the guidance or background to judge for myself.”


    Among her 1950s films were “While the City Sleeps,” directed by Fritz Lang and co-starring Dana Andrews. She played Cleopatra in the 1953 film “Serpent of the Nile.”


    But many titles were forgettable: “The Eagle and the Hawk,” “The Last Outpost,” “Little Egypt,” “The Killer Is Loose,” “Slightly Scarlet,” “Crosswinds” and “Pony Express” (with Charlton Heston), “Inferno,” “Those Redheads from Seattle,” “Yankee Pasha,” and “Gun Glory.”


    After her film career cooled off, Fleming took a singing act to Las Vegas, appeared in TV shows and commercials, starred on Broadway in a revival of “The Women” and sang as the temptress Lalume in “Kismet” for the Los Angeles Civic Light Opera.


    She was born in Los Angeles in 1923. Her mother, Effie Graham, had appeared in a 1914 Broadway musical with Al Jolson, and her grandfather was a theatrical producer in Salt Lake City. She studied acting, but as a backup also took classes in shorthand, typing and bookkeeping.


    While still in her teens, Fleming married her high school sweetheart, Thomas Lane. A son, Kent, was born in 1941.

    When Lane returned from Army service, Rhonda had become a star, and the marriage ended in 1947. Three other marriages also ended in divorce, to Beverly Hills surgeon Lewis Morrill (1952-1958); actor Lang Jeffries (1960-1962); and producer-director Hall Bartlett (1966-1972).


    In 1977 Fleming married mogul Ted Mann, who built the Mann Theater chain, and the marriage lasted until his death in 2001. For many years, they lived in matching 4,300-square-foot condominiums, one on top of the other in a Century City high-rise. “I treasure my privacy, and Ted needs his,” she once explained. “We love each other very much. I’m much more fulfilled today than at any time in my life.”


    After Fleming’s sister, Beverly Engel, died of cancer in 1991, Fleming and her husband established the Rhonda Fleming Mann Resource Center for Women with Cancer at the UCLA Medical Center. They also was active in various other charities for cancer patients, children and the homeless.


    A couple of years after Mann died, Fleming married for a sixth time, to Derol W. Carlson, who died in 2017.
    Rhonda Fleming, film star of ‘40s and ‘50s, dies at 97

  17. #5117
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    A nice tip of the hat to Trink from Roger Crutchley.

    Early encounters with the Nite Owl

  18. #5118
    Thailand Expat
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    And what happened with Wanda Sloan? For many years I had enjoyed her style when reviewing computer things in Database. And I had learned a lot from her advice...
    Last edited by Klondyke; 18-10-2020 at 03:38 PM.

  19. #5119
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    hallelujah's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    A nice tip of the hat to Trink from Roger Crutchley.

    Early encounters with the Nite Owl
    Trink was eventually shunted to the corner of the Post's office after some of the more delicate flowers became upset by the almost constant streaming of Goldie Hawn on his work PC, so he did find one use for modern technology.

  20. #5120
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    And what happened with Wanda Sloan? For many years I had enjoyed her style when reviewing computer things in Database. And I had learned a lot from her advice...
    It might blow your mind to know that there was never a "Wanda Slaon". Wanda Slaon is an angram for Alan Dawson, a former sub-editor for the Bangkok Poat.

  21. #5121
    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barty View Post
    It might blow your mind to know that there was never a "Wanda Slaon". Wanda Slaon is an angram for Alan Dawson, a former sub-editor for the Bangkok Poat.
    Actually, I do not know who is "Wanda Slaon". And I do not give a hoot what's a real name of "Wanda Sloan", same as I do not care what the real name of George Orwell was.
    Anyway, enjoyed the writing style of "Wanda Sloan" and the info either...

    Search Results - Bangkok Post : The world windows to Thailand

  22. #5122
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barty View Post
    It might blow your mind to know that there was never a "Wanda Slaon". Wanda Slaon is an angram for Alan Dawson, a former sub-editor for the Bangkok Poat.
    It doesn't take much to blow klondyke's mind. It's rather small.

  23. #5123
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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  24. #5124
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    For those of you thinking "Spencer Davis sure looks and sounds like Steve Winwood", that actually is Steve Winwood. Spencer Davis was the tall one playing guitar in the center of the group.

    I'm impressed that he was able to put his ego aside and make someone else the lead singer in order to make a better sound.

  25. #5125
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Frank Bough.

    Broadcaster of some repute, and I thought his went up when I found out he was popping in on his way home to snort coke and do hookers in his cardigan.

    Sadly the Beeb didn't see it that way.

    The RIP Famous Person Thread-_115065271_mediaitem87716540-jpg


    Frank Bough: Former Grandstand presenter dies, aged 87 - BBC News

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