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  1. #1
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    My Crack At Corned Beef (Silverside)

    Had some when back in OZ and loved it (With mashed spuds/Broccoli/carrot/Brussel sprouts and cheese sauce) , was a regular meal growing up so thought I would try to make it here but alas Silverside (Corned Beef) is not readily available.

    Trawling the intenet yeiled a few "recipes" including one from our own Dirtydog (It looked less than appetizing), http://teakdoor.com/the-kitchen/5093...rned-beef.html (Thai Corned Beef).

    Spoke with my Mum about my want for this and she managed to grab my Grandmothers recipe from her sister, here it is.

    Silverside (GranMa Fondles Style).

    1 Beef Brisket, approx. 2kg and trimmed of excessive fat

    5 litres of fresh water

    5 cups sea salt (non iodised), may require more after testing

    4 cloves of fresh garlic, peeled

    2 medium onions, rough chopped

    2 tablespoons whole mustard seed

    2 tablespoons whole coriander seeds

    1 tablespoon whole cloves

    3 tablespoons whole peppercorns

    2 large bay leaves

    1 tablespoon thyme

    1 cup brown sugar


    Using a large stainless steel pot, combine the salt and water, stir for several minutes until all the salt is dissolved.
    To test the cure for the proper amount of salt, place an uncooked egg into the mix. If the egg does not float, add more salt, testing with the egg after each addition until the egg floats.
    When the brine passes the egg float test, combine the remaining ingredients and add the brisket.
    Submerge the meat using a heavy object such as another stainless steel pot or a non-porous ceramic plate or two.

    You want to make sure the brisket remains completely submerged at all times. Cover and refrigerate for 8 to 12 days, turning the brisket once every other day. The thicker the brisket is, the longer it will take to fully cure.
    So Off I goes to Foodland to purchase what's needed.

    The rest is piccies but it's underway.

    The mix




    Dead Cow




    Dead cow in mix



    Weighted down



    Ready for fridge



    I need to turn the meat every two days for the next 12 days so will update with a piccie from each turning with a "grand finale" served on a plate with some veggies and cheese sauce.
    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly View Post
    let me explain simply 100MB != 1GB RAM

  2. #2
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    Kurgen's Avatar
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    Did you forget to trim the fat off?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kurgen View Post
    Did you forget to trim the fat off?

    Adds to the flavour and texture.

    Good Luck!
    A decent cured brisket is a work of art...

  4. #4
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    Fat left was only very thin or on the surface.
    As RS said, it add's to the flavour.

  5. #5
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    I wasn't trying to be rude in any way, I was just asking.

    12 bluddy days !!!

  6. #6
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    Am I getting and invite for the unveiling?

  7. #7
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    Wouldn't it be easier to buy a tin of corned beef ? One of the best meals I ever had in Pattaya was at Palmer's Bar - corned beef, egg and chips, bread and butter and a cup of tea.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Am I getting and invite for the unveiling?

    Whilst normally I would be offended by someone asking an invite to my joint (all are welcome and should know this).

    I reckon in this instance I'll pull it from the pot alone incase it is an epic fail.

    Having said that Ive an awesome barbeque that could always do with someone else slinging snags on. would break up the usual Saturday night grind.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles
    Whilst normally I would be offended by someone asking an invite to my joint
    Ill bring the beer plus I've met you already in person so no need to feel offended anymore.

  10. #10
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    Can't beat corned beef fritters! I'm inspired to make some soon now

  11. #11
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    I often wondered what part of the cow corned beef came from ,, look forward to seeing a slice between two other slices

  12. #12
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    Good effort Fondles.

    I don't think I have cooked anything since I moved to Thailand.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by can123
    Wouldn't it be easier to buy a tin of corned beef ? One of the best meals I ever had in Pattaya was at Palmer's Bar - corned beef, egg and chips, bread and butter and a cup of tea.
    Thats not really the point the guy is making an effort to do something original

    Just like your missing the point travelling half way round the world to eat a pile of kak which you could have bought from your local greasy Cardiff spoon , especially when there is so much delicious fresh fish on offer in that area ,, mabe some rank old fish there to ?
    I'm proud of my 38" waist , also proud I have never done drugs

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelandjan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by can123
    Wouldn't it be easier to buy a tin of corned beef ? One of the best meals I ever had in Pattaya was at Palmer's Bar - corned beef, egg and chips, bread and butter and a cup of tea.
    Thats not really the point the guy is making an effort to do something original

    Just like your missing the point travelling half way round the world to eat a pile of kak which you could have bought from your local greasy Cardiff spoon , especially when there is so much delicious fresh fish on offer in that area ,, mabe some rank old fish there to ?
    The point can123 is missing is that I want proper Silverside (Corned Beef) not a can of mush that the seppos call spam.

    Speaking of kak, fish rates right up there, never will it pass my lips unless it has been battered/crumbed then deep fried and served with a generous serving of chips.

  15. #15
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    So Fondles where a picture of the finished product or is it to late.
    The evidence has been consummed.

  16. #16
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    11 more days till finished pics can be published.

  17. #17
    ENT
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    Pickling a decent piece of meat is an acquired skill, so don't be put off by the results of your first effort if they fall short of expectations, Fondles.
    It'll still taste good, believe me.
    Looks like a good recipe, full of flavour!

    Texture is the thing to look for in a good pickle, too tight in the grain makes the slab difficult to cut, a bit crumbly (too much salt).
    Too loose, (not enough salt) will make the meat fall apart in shreds as you cut it,

    Good luck and enjoy!

  18. #18
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    Cheers Ent, will defo be trying more even if this one fails.

  19. #19
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    Sorry I read the recipe but not the instuction.
    I will have to pay more attention next time & look forward to your out come.

  20. #20
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    I used to make my own hams years ago (2001) and bought one of these for about $20 probably cheaper if you looked on Ebay

    All you do is get a 5 ltr napsack garden sprayer in fill your solution into that and replace the sprayer part with the syringe.

    The silver side syringes have the end cut off as you are meant to find the large blood arteries and inject into them. You can still use my pork one but not as good.


    If you ever use sodium nitrate I think this is your salt ratios.



    And some other tips he gave me.



    All the best with it.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles
    Speaking of kak, fish rates right up there, never will it pass my lips unless it has been battered/crumbed then deep fried and served with a generous serving of chips.
    The same for me. We all have our preferences. The thought of any meat product being refrigerated, rather than frozen, in Thailand, fills me with dread. Very dangerous, if you ask me. I love Thai food but I cannot help my upbringing. Only those who have actually lived in Thailand can comment on what should be the food of choice for an individual at any given time. My meal at Palmers was fantastic !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by can123 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles
    Speaking of kak, fish rates right up there, never will it pass my lips unless it has been battered/crumbed then deep fried and served with a generous serving of chips.
    The thought of any meat product being refrigerated, rather than frozen, in Thailand, fills me with dread. Very dangerous, if you ask me.
    Is the inside of a fridge located in Thailand different to one located elsewhere ?

  23. #23
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    I will be following this to see how it turns out. I always wanted to make corned beef from scratch.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles
    s the inside of a fridge located in Thailand different to one located elsewhere ?
    No, but I don't keep meat refrigerated for twelve days.

  25. #25
    ENT
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    Whenever I killed a beast, after gutting, skinning and washing it, I'd hang it for a day before butchering it.
    Some of it would go into a freezer to age before cooking and eating any of it.

    Some we'd eat straight off, stuff like liver and chops, the tail, for an oxtail soup, or the tongue, boiled up to eat later when cold.
    The kidney's I'd keep for a steak and kidney pud, and the stomach lining of a cow for tripe and onions, which the kids hated!

    Mutton or pork legs were defo for hams or bacon!
    We'd make the corned beef the same day as the hams.

    After curing the hams in salt and sugar, I'd hang them in a cold fly proof little shed to age.
    Some of it was perfect after a year kept this way.
    No fridge where we were.

    All the flaps and bits and intestines and some of the forelegs would go into sausages.

    The skin, I'd clean and tan. Hard work, but worth it to get a beautiful rug or just for leather.

    Some, particularly a leg of venison, or goat, or boar, or goose, I'd hang for anything up to a couple of weeks in a dark cold place, not a fridge, but a cellar or a cold pantry.
    This would ripen the meat, it would start to ferment, basically, breaking the muscle fibre down to make it really tender.
    Then we'd slice and cook it.

    That's civilized for you.

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