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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    Backlash grows against Irish famine TV comedy


    The Famine memorial sculpture near the International Financial Services Centre in Dublin. Photo: Niall Carson/PA


    More than 20,000 people have signed an online petition against UK Channel 4's plans to make a comedy about the Irish Famine.


    The petition, set up by Glaswegian Fairlie Gordon, calls on programmers not to make a comedy series about the Great Famine, which took place between 1845 and 1852. More than one million men, women and children died from starvation and disease during the famine.

    Mr Gordon's petition - on www.change.org - aims to stop Channel 4 from making a comedy series about the Irish famine.

    The series, titled 'Hungry', is in the writing stage.

    "Famine or genocide is no laughing matter, approximately one million Irish people died, and another two million were forced to emigrate, because they were starving, any programme on this issue would have to be of serious historical context, not a comedy," reads the petition.

    Channel 4 has been criticised since revealing it intended to make a comedy series set in this time of mass starvation, disease and emigration. During this period taxes, rents, and food exports worth £6m were sent to British landlords.

    Script

    It confirmed it commissioned a script set in 19th century Ireland by Dublin-based writer Hugh Travers and Irish-based production company Grand Pictures.

    Popular Irish blogger Leanne Woodfull was among those who voiced her opinion on the matter on social media.

    "How dare Channel 4 even consider a 'comedic' TV show that surrounds one of the most fatal and devastating events in our history," she said.

    Famine historian and author Tim Pat Coogan said he had serious reservations about the prospect of such a series.

    "It does seem an unsavory thing, with such agony, and it being such a horrendous thing that it still has a bad effect on relationships between Ireland and England," said the multi-award-winning historian.

    Mr Coogan writes in his book, 'The Famine Plot', that the famine was an act of genocide by the British authorities. "We could be all pleasantly surprised, but my initial reaction is one of dismay. Would they make a comedy series about the Holocaust? It really does defeat your powers of comprehension.

    Channel 4 said the sitcom remained a work in progress. "This in the development process and is not currently planned to air... It's not unusual for sitcoms to exist against backdrops that are full of adversity and hardship."

    http://www.independent.ie/irish-news...-30882122.html
    Irish Independent
    Last edited by KEVIN2008; 08-01-2015 at 01:35 PM.

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat
    12Call's Avatar
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    Could be an attack on C4 like France yesterday.

    Some clowns will never learn, especially poms.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    What, too soon?
    Nobody complains about MASH. I’d hope the sitcom would not find comedy in the situation itself, but rather in the characters it portrays. I can’t see it being that funny myself though,..... I can’t imagine the famine for being a great time for jokes, but then again maybe Channel 4 wants to teach us all the comedic values of life.

    I certainly won’t be signing the petition as I don’t think the public have the right to dictate what comedy should be ........until it airs, that is. Then, the viewing figures,
    will dictate whether viewers should watch or not.

    Never watched it, but didn't "Father Ted" poke fun at the RC church and remember the brilliant "Dave Allen At Large" ....poked fun at the Pope and Catholics almost every night

    Here one of his best sketches....pope striptease


  • #4
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    Brilliant stuff....

  • #5
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    What next Yersinia pestis?

    Holocaust already been done.
    Jake Rosenberg, a young playwright from San Francisco whose “Holocaust comedy” set in Auschwitz makes its New York premiere next week, says his biggest bout of nerves came when the play was performed for the first time in his hometown last year. At the last moment, five elderly members of the audience took their seats, in the first row.
    All were Holocaust survivors. “I saw their tattoos,” the numbers on their arms, Rosenberg told The Jewish Week in a recent interview.
    He asked himself what they would think of “Muse of Fire,” his farce about a group of Auschwitz inmates who put on a play about the anti-Semitic trial of Alfred Dreyfus. Would they be offended? Would they walk out?
    Rosenberg, who wrote the play as a senior project at the Jewish Community High School of the Bay, needn’t have worried.
    The survivors stayed in their seats. “They were engaged. They were laughing at the jokes. They didn’t storm out,” said Rosenberg, 19, now a freshman at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.
    The Holocaust survivors didn’t hang around after the play to discuss it with him, but he calls their “silent approval,” the fact that they did not seem to take offense at the play’s edgy approach to life in a death camp, “the highest compliment.”
    Rosenberg, who grew up hearing about the Holocaust at home (his father’s side of the family was from Russia; his mother’s, from Rhodes) and at school, said memory of the Shoah was an ever-present part of his youth. “That was my heritage.”
    He knew the basic facts. Then he came across an article online about concentration camp prisoners who used humor among themselves as a coping tool, as a form of spiritual resistance, as an escape from the daily horrors.


    More here: A ?Muse? For Holocaust Comedy | The Jewish Week

  • #6
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    Episode 1 scene 1
    :
    Hilarity ensues as Paddy and Michael Doyle try to steal a loaf of bread to feed their brothers and sisters.
    Michael is caught, sent to court, and sentenced to 5 years in Van Diemen’s Land. His family never see him again.

    Scene 2: When he gets back to the dilapidated cottage he calls home, Paddy discovers that his youngest sister has died from consumption (audience laughs). “Where’s Mary?” asks Paddy, as he enters the cottage.
    “She’s dead, Paddy” says his sister Grainne (audience laughs). “Thankfully she’s up in heaven now with our mother and father”, says Grainne (audience laughs hysterically).

    Scene 3: We see the Joseph, the eldest Doyle, boarding a famine ship for the new world. His family never see him again (audience members start throwing up because they are laughing too much at this comedy).

    Scene 4: We cut back to the days before the Doyle parents died.

    We see Joseph Sr. and the rest of the family working on the small piece of land they once owned. They were planting wheat and peas.
    Then the potato blight struck, their crops were taken from them by their landlord, and they were evicted.
    At this point, the audience members start to fcuking die from laughing too much.

    My take not C4s.....

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