Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Member
    Aguda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Last Online
    30-08-2017 @ 05:56 PM
    Posts
    159

    Ancient tribe becomes extinct as last member dies

    We seem to hear often about plant and animal life going extinct, but it
    feels even more tragic when human diversity is reduced. Another culture
    and language is lost to the world. We are all as a people a little bit poorer.

    Click on the link for the video.
    http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapcf/02/05/india.extinct.tribe/index.html?hpt=Sbin

    Ancient tribe becomes extinct as last member dies

    By Harmeet Shah Singh, CNN


    STORY HIGHLIGHTS
    • Boa Sr, 85, died last week in the Andaman islands, about 750 miles off India's eastern coast
    • Experts: She was last member of one of 10 Great Andamanese tribes, the Bo
    • Linguists say India has also lost one of its most endangered languages, also called Bo


    New Delhi, India (CNN) -- The last member of an ancient tribe that has inhabited an Indian island chain for around 65,000 years has died, a group that campaigns for the protection of indigenous peoples has said.
    Boa Sr, who was around 85 years of age, died last week in the Andaman islands, about 750 miles off India's eastern coast, Survival International said in a statement.
    The London-based group, which works to protect indigenous peoples, said she was the last member of one of ten distinct Great Andamanese tribes, the Bo.
    "The Bo are thought to have lived in the Andaman islands for as long as 65,000 years, making them the descendants of one of the oldest human cultures on earth," it noted.
    With her passing at a hospital, India also lost one of its most endangered languages, also called Bo, linguists say.
    "She was the last speaker of (the) Bo language. It pains to see how one by one we are losing speakers of Great Andamanese and (their) language is getting extinct. (It is) A very fast erosion of (the) indigenous knowledge base, that we all are helplessly witnessing," read an obituary in Boa Sr's honor posted on the Web site of the Vanishing Voices of the Great Andamanese (VOGA) project.
    Project director Anvita Abbi, a professor at New Delhi's Jawaharlal Nehru University, met with Boa as recently as last year. "She was the only member who remembered the old songs," Abbi recounted in her obituary.
    "Boa Sr was the only speaker of Bo and had no one to converse with in that language," Abbi told CNN. Her husband and children had already died, the linguist said.
    Other than Bo, she also knew local Andaman languages, which she would use to converse, according to Abbi.
    Boa Sr was believed to be the oldest of the Great Andamanese, members of ten distinct tribes. Survival International estimates there are now just 52 Great Andamanese left.
    There were believed to be 5,000 of them when the British colonized the archipelago in 1858. Most of those tribal communities were subsequently killed or died of diseases, says Survival International.
    The British also held the indigenous tribes people captive in what was called an Andaman Home, but none of the 150 children born there survived beyond two years of age, according to the group.
    Boa Sr also survived the killer Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004.
    She recorded in Bo what she saw when the giant waves arrived. "While we were all asleep, the water rose and filled all around. We did not get up before the water rose. Water filled where we were and as the morning broke the water started to recede," reads a translation of her tsunami narrative posted on the VOGA Web site.
    Activists are expressing alarm over her death.
    "Boa's loss is a bleak reminder that we must not allow this to happen to the other tribes of the Andaman islands," Survival director Stephen Corry said in the statement. Andaman and Nicobar Islands authorities put at least five tribes in their list of vulnerable indigenous communities.
    According to Corry's group, the surviving Great Andamanese depend largely on the Indian government for food and shelter and abuse of alcohol is rife.
    Among the tribes are the Sentinelese, who inhabit a 60-square-kilometer island.
    Officials believe the group is probably the world's only surviving Paleolithic people without contact with any other community. They said the Sentinelese are very hostile and never leave their Island. Very little is known about them.
    Life is a state of mind.

  2. #2
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413

    Boa Sr, représentante de l'une des plus vieilles tribus du monde, les "bo", est décédée.

    s.tf1.fr

  3. #3
    Member
    deathstardan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Last Online
    18-10-2019 @ 11:15 AM
    Location
    The Dark Side Of The Moon
    Posts
    728
    Bugger!

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
    nevets's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Last Online
    16-02-2015 @ 12:11 PM
    Location
    PHETCHABURI
    Posts
    1,630
    Let`s hope some one taped/ videoed the woman talking and resiting her alphabet or words. And any literature on the language is kept safe.

  5. #5
    I am in Jail

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Last Online
    22-11-2011 @ 08:27 AM
    Location
    Christian Country
    Posts
    15,020
    Sad. Bet it was all passed down via story-telling...

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    08-09-2014 @ 10:43 AM
    Location
    Simian Islands
    Posts
    34,827
    C'est la vie.

  7. #7
    Member
    Aguda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Last Online
    30-08-2017 @ 05:56 PM
    Posts
    159
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    C'est la vie.
    No, Marmite, that is not life. I don't speak french but C'est la morte may be how
    it is said. It is still tragic to loose a culture.

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat
    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    08-09-2014 @ 10:43 AM
    Location
    Simian Islands
    Posts
    34,827
    Quote Originally Posted by Aguda
    No, Marmite, that is not life.
    Try telling the dinosaurs that.

    It is a fact of life. In nature that strong survive. The fact that we still have American Indians or Aborigines still doing their thing is due to man's intervention and not following the laws of nature.

    Things come and go, including human races, including the human race. It's no big deal.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    35,159
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    ...The fact that we still have American Indians or Aborigines still doing their thing is due to man's intervention and not following the laws of nature...
    How do you figure, it was precisely the intervention of 'man' that lead to the decimation of both groups in the first place.

    The Bo too apparently:
    ...But today, after more than 150 years of contact with colonisers, the diseases they brought with them and the disastrous impact of alcohol, the Great Andamanese number just 52...


    ...According to Survival, when British colonial forces failed to pacify the tribes through violence in the 19th century, they sought to "civilise" them by capturing many and keeping them in an institution. But of about 150 children born in the so-called Andaman Home, none lived beyond the age of 2....
    With one last breath, a people and language are gone - World - NZ Herald News

  10. #10
    Mid
    Mid is offline
    Thailand Expat
    Mid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    1,413
    too many hole in that argument to let it go Marmite .

    comparing humans and dinosaurs is chalk and cheese ,

    but the biggest facility is to suggest it's a case of only the strong surviving when in reality it is because we didn't look after our own ,

    the human race is still here , just a sub sect has been lost . due to neglect .

  11. #11
    Member
    Aguda's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Last Online
    30-08-2017 @ 05:56 PM
    Posts
    159
    Marmite,
    You are right, that is the nature of life, we differ on the feeling that it is no big deal.

  12. #12
    Banned for deleting Gallery
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    2,671
    Quote Originally Posted by Aguda View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    C'est la vie.
    No, Marmite, that is not life. I don't speak french but C'est la morte may be how
    it is said. It is still tragic to loose a culture.
    Maybe, if a group of stone age like tribes people who never achieved anything much more than a few daft stories and some primitive instruments is considered a loss, I don't think so myself.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat
    Marmite the Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Last Online
    08-09-2014 @ 10:43 AM
    Location
    Simian Islands
    Posts
    34,827
    I shall shed a tear for every plant, animal and tribe that has become extinct over the last few hundred million years if that makes everyone happier.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    35,159
    Nah, stick with the sarcasm and sardonicism.

  15. #15
    Thailand Expat
    BugginOut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Last Online
    26-11-2013 @ 03:43 AM
    Location
    In the hearts of cats.
    Posts
    1,250


    RIP
    I'll miss her funny her stories and that cute little way she used to twirl her hair when she got nervous.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •