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Thread: Airline News

  1. #3051
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    And in this week's "Just Fancy That"....

    Thai pilots are failing to find work after graduation despite high global demand in the aviation industry, the Civil Aviation Training Centre president said on Monday.

    International airline operators are competing to offer jobs to pilots, but “our pilots find no jobs”, according to Piya Atmungkun.

    Between 600 and 700 newly graduated pilots are struggling to secure seats in cockpits, he said.


    Aviation programmes and pilot training schools have mushroomed, but many fail to meet international standards, according to RAdm Piya.

    New pilots are being churned out continually without information of how many of them are actually employable by airline companies. This has led to the oversupply of pilots who aren't up to scratch, he said.


    “The picture of the Thai aviation industry is being distorted by the claim that we lack pilots,” RAdm Piya said.

    "It's true there is a scarcity of pilots, but that demand is for experienced, not new, pilots, RAdm Piya said.

    He believes a plan to establish a “city of aviation” in the Eastern Economic Corridor (EEC) will only increase the supply of domestic aviation personnel.


    “Even before the EEC officially opens, there is already a high number of aviation graduates,” RAdm Piya said.


    “But companies will not employ them if their qualifications are not certified according to international standards.”


    One solution, according to RAdm Piya, is the suggestion by the UN-based International Civil Aviation Organisation that Thailand should set up an aviation centre of excellence in the EEC which would also enrol students from CLMV (Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar and Vietnam) countries, African nations and those under the former Soviet republic.


    If given the green light, the new centre would offer high-quality training at a more affordable price than Singapore, he said.

    https://www.bangkokpost.com/business/1801834/

  2. #3052
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    What % of Thai Airways and other Thai airlines pilots, are non Thai trained?

    What % of Thai trained pilots are allegedly

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    not certified according to international standards.”
    How are these presumably, Thai "certified", pilots allowed to fly planes to and from countries who demand pilots to be, "certified according to international standards"?

    Are the "certifiers", Thai or otherwise, open to inducements, similar to the current FAA who, "certify" airplanes?

    My understanding of pilots worldwide, when obtaining a new position, is that they are required to hold, a "certified" pilots licence, "certification" to fly certain airplane types, a required number of "in Command" hours and are subjected to the approval of a senior airline pilot, after compulsory certified flying skill test procedures.

    One hopes it not skin colour, upper body muscle (UBM) or race that defines a certifiable airline pilot.

    Although there does appear to be some additional requirements with regards to UBM when it comes to Boeing 737 MAX pilots.
    Last edited by OhOh; 26-11-2019 at 12:11 PM.
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  3. #3053
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    Best 10 Airlines 2020 announced, no sign of THAI

    AirlineRatings (www.airlineratings.com) has announced its ranking of the Best 10 Airlines 2020 with no sign of Thai Airways International (THAI). However, Thailand’s national carrier did claim the last spot in last year’s top 10 ranking by Skytrax.

    According to AirlineRatings’ website, the rankings were judged by seven editors with more than 200 years of industry experience between them, combined with major safety and government audits and based on 12 key criteria including fleet age, passenger reviews, profitability, investment rating, product offerings, and staff relations.



    The Best 10 Airlines 2020 are as follows:


    1. Air New Zealand


    2. Singapore Airlines


    3. All Nippon Airways


    4. Qantas


    5. Cathay Pacific Airways


    6. Emirates


    7. Virgin Atlantic



    8. EVA Air


    9. Qatar Airways


    10. Virgin Australia



    https://www.nationthailand.com/news/...ernal_referral

  4. #3054
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Best 10 Airlines 2020 announced, no sign of THAI

    Bottom 10 Airlines maybe?
    “Someone is sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago”

  5. #3055
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    Jetstar strike threatens Christmas holiday plans

    Airline News-5471240-3x2-700x467-jpg


    Passengers booked on a flight with budget airline Jetstar could have their holiday plans disrupted, with ground crew, baggage handlers and pilots expected to strike in the weeks leading up to Christmas and beyond.


    Key points:
    • Jetstar ground crew, baggage handlers and pilots have voted to do a series of strikes in the lead up to Christmas and beyond
    • The Transport Workers Union says workers are struggling on low pay, but the company says its offer of a 3 per cent annual wage increase is reasonable
    • The pilots union, the Australian Federation of Air Pilots (AFAP), also wants better pay and conditions



    The Transport Workers Union (TWU) said on Friday that about 250 Jetstar workers in Sydney, Melbourne, Avalon, Brisbane, Cairns and Adelaide had voted in favour of taking protected industrial action, which could include work stoppages of up to 24 hours.

    In addition, 650 Jetstar pilots — part of the Australian Federation of Air Pilots (AFAP) — have also voted to strike.
    The decision to strike was taken after the airline rejected demands for better employment conditions relating to pay and working hours.

    The TWU said the union must give the company three working-days' notice before taking industrial action, so the earliest a strike could take place would be on Thursday.

    But there could be a number of short strikes in the lead up to Christmas and beyond, it added.

    https://tinyurl.com/vdhs8f6

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Airline News-5471240-3x2-700x467-jpg  
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  6. #3056
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    Every day Boeing pin their hopes on a flying deathtrap is going to hurt them.

    Airline News-960x0-jpg

    United Airlines just announced it is purchasing 50 new A321XLR aircraft from Airbus. The carrier plans to use the long-range jet to replace and retire its aging fleet of Boeing 757-200 aircraft, the last of which was built in 2004.

    United says the A321XLR lowers overall fuel burn per seat by 30% compared to previous generation aircraft. The plane can fly at its listed cruising speed of 514 mph for more than 9 hours. The lower fuel burn, combined with greater fuel storage, gives the A321XLR a listed range of 4700 nautical miles. It also brings United closer to its goal of reducing its carbon footprint by 50% relative to 2005 levels by 2050.

    Although the A321XLR can carry up to 244 passengers in a single class layout, an Airbus sources says United will seat about 170 to allow for lie-flat seats in the business class cabin. The plane will also offer LED lighting, larger overhead bin space and Wi-Fi connectivity.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelgoldstein/2019/12/04/united-airlines-to-buy-50-ultra-long-range-airbus-a321xlr-aircraft-in-estimated-6-billion-deal/#898d400624ac
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Airline News-960x0-jpg  

  7. #3057
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    (Refreshing "WMD", this time with an airline?)

    Washington expands sanctions against Iran's largest airline, accusing it of weapons of mass destruction proliferation
    11 Dec, 2019

    The US rolled out new sanctions against Iranian companies, including its largest airline Mahan Air, accused of “weapons of mass destruction proliferation” and transportation of lethal aid to Yemen.

    The airline, which has been a target of Washington’s restrictions since 2011, has been repeatedly accused by the US of having deep ties with the Iraninan Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) and regularly transporting its troops and hardware around the region.

    “The Iranian regime uses its aviation and shipping industries to supply its regional terrorist and militant groups with weapons, directly contributing to the devastating humanitarian crises in Syria and Yemen,” US Secretary of the Treasury Steven T. Mnuchin said in a statement.

    This time, the airline was sanctioned under the Executive Oder 13382 which targets “proliferators of weapons of mass destruction and their supporters.” It was not immediately clear how exactly the company engaged in such alleged activities.

    The allegations that the airline has been proliferating WMDs in some fashion are “ridiculous,” a professor at the University of Tehran, Seyed Mohammad Marandi, says. The new restrictions are yet another attempt to harm the Iranian people, who are the real target of the economic war – despite claims from Washington it only seeks to hit the authorities of the Islamic Republic.

    “It’s ridiculous and everyone knows it’s ridiculous. The United States is engaging in economic warfare against Iran and ordinary Iranians,” Marandi told RT. “The Americans have sanctioned Iranian airlines for decades now, and what they want to do is make it more dangerous for people to fly.”

    The Treasury sanctioned three general sales agents of Mahan Air, as well as dozens of aircraft belonging to or operated by the airline.

    The sanctions might have “very heavy implications” for the airline, which will likely be barred from using airports in countries fearful of secondary sanctions coming from the US, as well as likely causing other problems, former Pentagon official Michael Maloof believes.

    “It could affect their ability to get component parts, depending upon the type of an aircraft,” he told RT. “It could be devastating in that respect and affect the safety of passengers. It could ultimately have the effect of shutting down the airline – and maybe that’s what they [the US] want to do.”

    Besides the air carrier, the sanctions also targeted an Iranian businessman, Abdolhossein Khedri, and two shipping companies belonging to him. The businessman stands accused of “terrorism support” and partaking in the IRGC “smuggling operations.”

    US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said the move is part of "maximum pressure campaign of sanctions against Iran."

    https://www.rt.com/news/475598-washi...-air-sanctions

  8. #3058
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    Maybe that Jetstar strike isn't so bad after all...


    A Jetstar flight came close to touching down without its landing gear in place as a result of a “series of distractions”, according to a new report.

    Pilots onboard flight VH-VQ from Sydney to Ballina forgot to lower the aircraft’s wheels after completing a “go-around” – an aborted landing – in May.

    On the second landing attempt, crew did not realise the landing gear was in the wrong position until a warning signal was triggered at just 700ft (213m).

    A new report from the Australian Transport Safety Bureau, seen by 7news, found that “the flight crew incorrectly actioned the landing checklist” and didn’t follow standard procedures during the first go-around, creating a “series of distractions”.

    “During the downwind leg following the first go-around, the flight crew did not select the landing gear down as they had commenced the configuration sequence for landing at the Flaps 3 setting,” read the report.

    “Furthermore the flight crew incorrectly actioned the landing checklist, which prevented the incorrect configuration for landing being identified and corrected.”

    After the warning signal, the pilots initiated a second go-around and landed safely on the third attempt.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/jetstar-landing-gear-flight-wheels-plane-pilots-report-a9242061.html

  9. #3059
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    The sheer arrogance of the FAA is mindboggling. They should be having hot pokers shoved up their arses.

    The FAA knew the 737 Max aircraft was unsafe and likely to crash 15 times during its life span after the Lion Air disaster and before the Ethiopian crash

    The second crash of a Boeing 737 Max could have and should have been avoided it has been revealed this week, after analysis carried out by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) after the first crash the twin jet in October 2018 clearly indicated that the MCAS flight-control that pitched the nose down would likely lead to as many as 15 catastrophic accidents over a 30 to 45-year life span if it was left unfixed. Yet the FAA didn't ground the jets then and there, its leaders let the fatally flawed jet's continue to operate even after a second crash which left hundreds dead. Indeed, even after that second crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jet, the FAA continued to safe the type was safe and was shamed into grounding the aircraft after virtually all the major national air safety authorities around the world grounded the 737 Max, over safety fears.

    The FAA’s own analysis was disclosed yesterday to the US House Transportation Committee Hearing which is investigating the FAA's oversight of Boeing and the 737 Max certification process.

    Peter DeFazio, chairman of the committee said: "The FAA rolled the dice on the safety of the travelling public and let the Max continue to fly until Boeing could overhaul its MCAS software."

    After a new Boeing 737 Max of Lion Air Max plunged into the sea off the coast of Indonesia in October 2018, the FAA carried out a risk assessment, which lead to the shocking conclusion the type would suffer a crash between every one to two years should the faulty software not be fixed. The FAA's leaders then took the decision to allow the Max to continue to operate - a decision that would prove to be deadly.

    The FAA had allowed manufacturer Boeing to self-certify many aspects of the 737 Max airworthiness prior to it entering service, selectively rubber-stamping things, despite alleged warnings from Boeing staff that corners were being cut and 'chaotic' management.

    Also on Wednesday, the FAA confirmed it was investigating a number of production issues at Boeing's 737 MAX factory, that were disclosed by a former manager at the plant who cited schedule pressure, lack of parts and worker fatigue as causes of quality and safety risks.

    The ex-manager, Ed Pierson said there was a “chaotic and alarming state” inside Boeing’s factory that undermined quality and safety. “It is alarming that these sensors failed on multiple flights mere months after the aeroplanes were manufactured in a factory experiencing frequent wiring problems and functional test issues,” he told the hearing. He said he had "Witnessed a factory in chaos and reported serious concerns about production quality to senior Boeing leadership months before the first crash." yet Boeing ignored his concerns and rather than slowly the production line to catch up, they ramped it up to a faster monthly completion rate.

    The jet's have been grounded since March and Boeing has been putting pressure on lawmakers and the FAA to get things moving again. The firm warned another significant delay in getting airworthiness certification of the 737 Max could force it to cut or even halt production of the type, which could have crippling repercussions across the supply chain.

    However, the FAA said it would not be subcontracting or allowing Boeing to self certify this time around with the 737 Max. A statement said "The FAA fully controls the approvals process for the flight control systems and is not delegating anything to Boeing," and "The FAA will retain authority to issue airworthiness certificates and export certificates of airworthiness for all new 737 Max airplanes manufactured since the grounding."

    https://www.air101.co.uk/2019/12/the-faa-knew-737-max-aircraft-was.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm _campaign=Feed:+co/fMxO+(Air101)


  10. #3060
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    Airbus beats Boeing to become preferred supplier for Qantas Sydney-London flights

    "Qantas Airways Ltd (QAN.AX) said on Friday it has chosen Airbus SE (AIR.PA) as preferred supplier for jets capable of the world’s longest commercial flights from Sydney to London, beating rival Boeing Co (BA.N) after a hard-fought contest.

    The choice of up to 12 A350-1000 planes fitted with an extra fuel tank for flights of up to 21 hours cements Airbus as the leader in ultra-long haul flying globally at a time when Boeing is battling delays on its rival 777X program and a broader corporate crisis following two deadly 737 MAX crashes.


    The Qantas flights would begin in the first half of 2023, but remain subject to reaching a pay deal with pilots, who would need to extend their duty times to around 23 hours to account for potential delays and switch between flying the A350 and the airline’s current A330 fleet. A final decision on an order is expected in March, the airline said.

    Qantas Chief Executive Alan Joyce said the airline “had a lot of confidence” in the market for non-stop services from Sydney to London and to New York based on two years of flying non-stop from Perth to London, where it has achieved a 30% fare premium over one-stop rivals in premium classes.

    “The A350 is a fantastic aircraft and the deal on the table with Airbus gives us the best possible combination of commercial terms, fuel efficiency, operating cost and customer experience,” he said.

    Singapore Airlines Ltd (SIAL.SI) operates the world’s current longest flight, nearly 19 hours from Singapore to New York, using an ultra-long range version of the smaller A350-900.

    Airbus Chief Commercial Officer Christian Scherer thanked Qantas for its selection in a statement, while a Boeing spokesman said it was disappointed with the decision but looked forward to continuing its longstanding partnership with the airline.


    Rico Merkert, a transport professor at the University of Sydney Business School, said the A350-1000 fit the Qantas brief well and was the safer choice, given Boeing has recently reported problems such as the grounding of the 737 MAX, structural cracks in 737 NGs and a fuselage split in a stress test of its 777-9.


    “The A350 just seems to be a much safer bet,” he said. “And safety is at the core of everything that Qantas does including its brand.”

    Airbus no longer provides list prices for aircraft, but based on its 2018 price list, the Qantas order could be worth up to $4.4 billion before heavy discounts that are standard for airline customers.

    Citi on Friday estimated the planes would cost A$3 billion ($2.04 billion) to $3.5 billion, with the investment likely to be phased over three years.

    The selection of the A350-1000 will add to growing doubts over Boeing’s plans to produce the 777-8 that it had proposed to Qantas for the mission.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-q...KBN1YG2PX?il=0
    Last edited by OhOh; 13-12-2019 at 09:43 AM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  11. #3061
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    Some good news for travellers, BA shareholders and presumably pilots. And for me, as I'm using them for a Glasgow run next month.

    British Airways pilots vote to settle dispute over pay

    Pilots at British Airways have overwhelmingly voted to settle their long-running dispute over pay and conditions with the airline.

    The vote confirms the end of one of the most damaging industrial disputes in BA’s history, which included two days of strikes in September and the cancellation of 2,325 flights. It cost the carrier £121m.

    In a ballot that closed on Monday, BA staff in the British Airline Pilots’ Association voted by almost 9 to 1 to accept a deal proposed by the Acas conciliation service in November.


    Pilots voted by more than 90% to take industrial action in the original ballot. The strikes in September were the first by pilots in the airline’s history.


    A third day of strikes was called off, and with pilots needing to take further action soon after Christmas or lose the mandate for industrial action, Balpa recommended they accept the deal, more than a year after talks started.


    The final deal is still worth the same 12% over three years, and does not have the profit-sharing scheme pilots demanded, but has some concessions on rosters and working issues.


    A BA spokesman said: “We welcome this news, which is a good result for our customers, our people and our business.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/dec/16/british-airways-pilots-vote-to-settle-dispute-over-pay
    It's still sad that employees don't get a share of the profits. It's a great motivator.

  12. #3062
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    Not such festive news for Boeing employees. They are going to suspend manufacture of the flying deathtrap. Surely now is the time for a change at the top and some seasonal manslaughter charges for those responsible both at Boeing and the FAA?

    Boeing is halting production of the embattled 737 Max starting in January

    New York (CNN Business)Boeing plans to suspend production of the 737 Max starting in January as it waits for the embattled plane to be recertified to return to service, the company announced Monday.

    The company's stock price closed down more than 4% Monday after early reports that Boeing (BA) might halt the plane's production began to circulate, and then fell another 0.67% after hours following the company's official announcement.

    The 737 Max was
    grounded worldwide in March after two fatal crashes — a Lion Air jet that plunged into the Java Sea in October 2018 and an Ethiopian Airlines plane downed near Addis Ababa in March — killed 346 people. But getting the plane back in the air has proven immensely difficult, causing major financial and reputational issues for Boeing (BA).


    Orders for the 737 Max
    dried up, and it wasn't until last month that Boeing recorded its first new orders — a total of only 30 planes — since the grounding. In the meantime, the company continued to produce the planes as it hoped for a quick recertification by airline regulators around the globe.


    Now that process, which has faced
    a number of setbacks, has been pushed into 2020 and Boeing has an inventory of about 400 of the airplanes in storage. The company said the continued uncertainty of the 737 Max's future forced it to make the drastic move to pause the plane's production and shift its focus to delivering planes it has already produced.


    "We believe this decision is least disruptive to maintaining long-term production system and supply chain health," Boeing said in a release Monday.


    Boeing did not say how long it expects production to be halted.


    Until last week, Boeing was still hoping to get certification for the plane to fly again before the end of this year. But FAA administrator Stephen Dickson said last week there was no chance that certification process could be completed before the end of 2019.


    Boeing has been building 42 of the 737 Max jets a month since the grounding, so as not to cause hardship for its suppliers or be forced to lay off workers it will need later. But the company has
    not been able to deliver the planes.


    The company has already said it will take until at least 2021 to deliver all the jets built since the grounding, as airlines cannot logistically or financially accept hundreds of additional planes all at once. Regulators also have to inspect each aircraft, adding to the delay.


    For now, Boeing said it doesn't expect to have to lay off or furlough employees. Affected workers will either continue 737-related work or be temporarily assigned to other teams.


    The company said it will provide financial information regarding the production suspension in January, when it announces its earnings for the last three months of 2019.


    The halt in deliveries since March has been a tremendous cash drain to Boeing, which makes most of its revenue once a plane is delivered. At the same time, though, the halt will actually reduce the company's expenses while deliveries are suspended, although Boeing later will have to pay billions to its airline customers to compensate them for the cost of the grounding.


    "Safely returning the 737 Max to service is our top priority,' the company said Monday. "We know that the process of approving the 737 Max's return to service, and of determining appropriate training requirements, must be extraordinarily thorough and robust, to ensure that our regulators, customers, and the flying public have confidence in the 737 Max updates ... We remain fully committed to supporting this process."

    https://edition.cnn.com/2019/12/16/business/boeing-suspends-737-max-production/index.html


  13. #3063
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    although Boeing later will have to pay billions to its airline customers to compensate them for the cost of the grounding.
    The Airlines that purchased the "same as any other 737" will also demand recompense. For the "misspoken" no "MAX" training required, sold by the snake oil sellers, out of the back of a, here today, gone tomorrow, wagon.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    determining appropriate training requirements,
    Full training to "western standards", for all? The "exceptional" western and the 3rd world "brown monkey" pilots.

    That's a heavy ongoing charge to Boing Boing's forward earnings. A 10 to 15 year commitment?
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  14. #3064
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    United extends 737 Max cancellations through June


    "United Airlines will pull its 14 Boeing 737 Max aircraft from its schedules through 4 June as the US Federal Aviation Administration’s safety review of the grounded aircraft extends into 2020 and carriers remain uncertain when those fleets could be cleared to return to service.

    The Chicago-based carrier had previously removed the Max from its schedule through 4 March.

    The airline has 14 737 Max jets in storage, with 144 more of the type on order, according to Cirium fleets data. In total, United Airlines has 764 aircraft of various types in service.

    American Airlines and Southwest Airlines, which have extended cancellations of their Max fleets through April, have removed the aircraft from their schedules one month at a time. United’s announcement departs from that month-by-month cancellation trend.

    The airline will cancel up to 108 flights per day through June during the grounding, says United spokesman Frank Benenati tells Cirium on 20 December. The extended cancellation will help the network team plan the year ahead, he says.

    “By moving the return to service date back more than just a month, as we have done previously throughout 2019, it allows us to have more certainty by providing our customers and our operation a firmer and more definitive timeline,” Benenati says. “We will better help our customers by reducing the number of our passengers we need to reassign to a new aircraft or rebook on a different flight.”

    Like other airlines with Max fleets in storage, United has covered the capacity gap with measures including flying spare aircraft on flights originally scheduled for Max aircraft. The FAA grounded the 737 Max in March 2019.

    Southwest has 34 737 Max airliners in storage and all its 262 on-order aircraft are Max jets, Cirium fleets data shows. American has 24 Max jets in storage and 76 on order."

    https://www.flightglobal.com/program...135912.article
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  15. #3065
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    Big Chief sacrificed. Little Chief promoted.

    Analysis: Calhoun’s insider status raises question: is he the one to pull Boeing out of its dive?


    "Dec. 23, 2019, © Leeham News: The Boeing Board of Directors has fired Dennis Muilenburg.

    Board chairman David Calhoun was named president and CEO, effective next month. The delay is required while Calhoun resigns from other business commitments.
    Boeing CFO Greg Smith was named interim CEO. Board member Lawrence Kellner was named non-executive chairman.
    Calhoun has been on the board 10 years. The roots of Boeing’s current crisis includes decisions made by the Board. Is Calhoun, an insider, the right person to pull Boeing out of its dive?


    Muilenburg’s demotion

    Muilenburg was demoted in October from his position as chairman, remaining president and CEO.
    Despite a rousing endorsement last month by David Calhoun, a long-time Boeing board member who was named chairman after the demotion, that from the board’s perspective, Muilenburg had done everything right, few supported this position.

    The 737 MAX crisis only got worse under Muilenburg’s leadership.
    Despite many forecasts about an early return to service, the grounding of the MAX extended time and again, like an airline’s creeping delay of a flight at the airport.
    Muilenburg mishandled family relations from the two MAX crashes.
    His public relations responses were awful (though I blame the corporate lawyers for setting this tone).

    His Congressional hearing performance was terrible.

    Relations with the Federal Aviation Administration spiraled down like an MCAS-induced flaw.
    Relations with airlines and lessors are tanking (also in part due to Boeing’s legal position on compensation).

    Calhoun’s appointment

    Calhoun was the Board’s lead director for years.

    He’s been on the Board since 2009. He’s been part of the Board policy-making that led to the cost-cutting some say had deleterious impact on the development of the MAX.

    He’s been part of the Board decisions that shareholder value is the No. 1 priority at Boeing.

    His career includes GE, and the GE influence permeated the Board of Directors for years with his and other directors who had GE background. This influence contributed to the direction the Board set about shareholder value, cost-cutting and operating margins.

    Remaking Boeing

    As noted in my Oct. 7 column, the Boeing board is entrenched.

    It also fails to include a pilot of high stature—someone like a Chesley Sullenburger or the late Al Haynes. Given what’s happened, a former investigator from the National Transportation Safety Board or a former member of the EASA regulatory agency might be a good addition.

    The GE cost-cutting culture in the executive ranks and the Board that’s been prevalent for 20 years needs to go.

    Crucial is a Board that has fresh perspective and is not married to “shareholder value” as the No. 1, 2 and 3 priorities.

    Shareholder value is important, of course. But not at the expense of safety and investing in new airplanes rather than derivatives of a 50-year old design (the 737) or a band aid (the 777X).

    Whether Calhoun, who has been part of the problem, is the person to make these changes remains to be seen."

    https://leehamnews.com/2019/12/23/analysis-calhouns-insider-status-raises-question-is-he-the-one-to-pull-boeing-out-of-its-dive/


    No mention of the axed Dennis Muilenburg's contract termination package.
    Last edited by OhOh; 23-12-2019 at 10:32 PM.
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  16. #3066
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    ^ Another mistake by Boeing. They need to get rid of the bean counters and put an engineer in charge. It might put some much needed faith back into their products.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    ^ Another mistake by Boeing. They need to get rid of the bean counters and put an engineer in charge. It might put some much needed faith back into their products.
    Didn't help much, Dennis Muilenburg was an engineer and engineers should do what they are best at and that is not running companies.
    The problem in Boeing and many other manufacturing companies is management having ears only for shareholders and no ears for engineers, that's what need to change but you don't do that by placing an engineer as the top dog.
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    The Boeing board failed the company. They need to reorganise and shift their focus to making good aircraft rather than simply cutting costs.

    The 777 was a huge success but they failed to build the equivalent short and mid range updates to replace the 737 and 757...they need to drop the 737 max, lick their wounds and come back with modern replacements.

    They won't do that with bean counters at the top. They need someone with a look to the future and designs for the future. It's end of the road for the 737.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    It's end of the road for the 737.
    On that we can agree.
    Passengers usually don't care what airplane they are traveling in but I'm sure many more will do that now and refuse to fly with a 737MAX.
    The plane is toxic and it is too late for Boeing to change that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    On that we can agree.
    Passengers usually don't care what airplane they are traveling in but I'm sure many more will do that now and refuse to fly with a 737MAX.
    The plane is toxic and it is too late for Boeing to change that.
    The plane can be made safe. It would have helped if they had done it after the first accident. But I agree that it won't help at this stage. I also believe that the fixes they have implemented yet are not enough to make it safe.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    It's end of the road for the 737.
    Take out the 737's and it's not even a footprint in the sand.

    Here are Boeings outstanding orders;

    The figures in the table for Total Unfilled Orders, ASC 606 Adjustment and Backlog include the orders, listed on this site, of Boeing Capital Corporation.
    737 747 767 777 787 Total
    Total Unfilled Orders 4,591 17 97 388 569 5,662
    ASC 606 Adjustment (186) (5) (27) (218)
    Backlog 4,405 17 97 383 542 5,444


    https://www.boeing.com/commercial/#/orders-deliveries

    737's - 4,405, all others - 1,141

    Therein lies the problem.
    Last edited by OhOh; 24-12-2019 at 03:51 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Big Chief sacrificed. Little Chief promoted.
    That will teach them...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Takeovers View Post
    The plane can be made safe. It would have helped if they had done it after the first accident. But I agree that it won't help at this stage. I also believe that the fixes they have implemented yet are not enough to make it safe.
    I disagree wholeheartedly from an engineering perspective. The plane should never be afforded the grandfather rights it receives.

    The 737 was a cheap product when it was born. It actually improved to be a classic but dropped to being the cheap alternative afterwards. It is out dated by the vc-10 for goodness sake. It is so old that only the cheapies are interested in it...and they sure as hell are not interested in you as a paying passenger, only in your money. Believe me the 737 max is dead and should stay dead.

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    Looks like a Fokker 100 has crashed shortly after take off in Kazakhstan. Not much detail yet

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    I disagree wholeheartedly from an engineering perspective. The plane should never be afforded the grandfather rights it receives.

    The 737 was a cheap product when it was born. It actually improved to be a classic but dropped to being the cheap alternative afterwards. It is out dated by the vc-10 for goodness sake. It is so old that only the cheapies are interested in it...and they sure as hell are not interested in you as a paying passenger, only in your money. Believe me the 737 max is dead and should stay dead.

    The order book implies differently. The customer airlines seem to like it. What it needs is a serous overhaul of the avionics. Triple redundant stall sensors and a thorough redesign of the software. Not band aid fixes like they seem to do presently.
    "don't attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by incompetence"

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