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  1. #1301
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    There is absolutely no doubt Ukrainians will be waging a war of attrition in the areas where Russian troops have control.
    They have nothing to lose so why not kill as many Russians as possible and have them living in fear?

  2. #1302
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    Russians 'had powerful radio reconnaissance positions on Snake Island' - Ukrainian official

    Russian forces had been using Snake Island to carry out radio reconnaissance, according to the secretary of the National Security and Defence Council.
    Oleksii Danilov told Ukrainska Pravda they had been using the island to monitor Odesa, the Bessarabia region, and issues in Transnistria.

    "They had a very powerful position there," he said, calling it a "strategically important" victory for Ukraine.
    He also refuted Russia's claims that its forces had left the island voluntarily.
    He said: "The way the Russian Federation interprets the events – that they allegedly left as a gesture of good will – is not consistent with reality.
    "In fact, they were dislodged from there by our heavy artillery.
    "Our armed forces using all means available inflicted the respective damage twice.
    "There was nowhere to hide, and they [Russian troops] had to flee."

    Ukraine news live: Kremlin lashes out at NATO and looks to draw China into Russia's rift with West; Sweden and Finland's entry thrown into doubt | World News | Sky News
    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink

  3. #1303
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    Ukraine Has Exposed Russia as a Not-So-Great Power

    This piece blows many of the articles Sabang posts out of the water, particularly the ones by Kissinger...

    In times of peace, much of what anyone says about national power is guesswork. Different claims can be based on hopes, prejudices, or even simple self-interest. Analysts and experts can speak confidently about how some states are undoubtedly great powers while others are weak, that some countries are led by strategic geniuses and others by corrupt incompetents. The statements can sound eminently plausible as facts, even be downright persuasive, because there is no way of knowing the truth.

    Until, that is, a war breaks out. The Russia-Ukraine war is now cutting through much of the nonsense that dominated the discussion of international power politics, posing particular challenges to blasé assumptions about what makes a state powerful, and what makes a country’s leadership effective. This reassessment doesn’t just concern the question of debatable prewar military analysis of Russia and Ukraine, or theories of international relations. Instead, it is aimed at the whole way we think about how countries interact with one another, about national power, and about leadership.

    The best place to start is the widespread notion going into the war that we were witnessing a clash between a great power controlled by an experienced, savvy—some even said brilliant—leader and a small state weakened by national division and led by a second-rate former comedian. This great power–small power dynamic was accepted practically universally among a group of scholars and analysts who have proclaimed themselves “realists.”

    Maybe the most famous realist in the world is Henry Kissinger, the former U.S. secretary of state and a longtime believer in the notion of great leaders and great powers. Kissinger, who met regularly with Vladimir Putin, has been arguing for forcing Kyiv to make concessions such as the handing over of the Crimea, internationally recognized as part of Ukraine but annexed by Moscow in 2014, to the Russians. To Kissinger, it has been important that the United States treat Russia as a “great power” and that it accepted Moscow’s claim to have a special interest in Ukraine.

    Academics, too, subscribe to this notion. In lectures, media appearances, and articles in the months before the invasion, well-known figures such as John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt described the Russia-Ukraine relationship as operating in the well-worn great power–small power framework. In this analysis, Putin was the clever strategist with a strong grasp on what he wanted, while the Ukrainians were weak, and it would be better for the world if their status was determined by the strong. Russia was, in Mearsheimer’s view, one of only “three great powers” in the world, and Putin was a rationalist, just wanting to secure a buffer state on his border, something Ukraine would have to deal with. Meanwhile, as Walt put it, Ukraine would have to accept the oppression and subjugation of its people to Russian interests because “great-power war is worse and brings much more suffering.” Other analysts, such as Samuel Charap, even believed that Russia was so strong, and would crush a weak Ukraine so easily, that the West should provide no support for Kyiv, because it would all be wasted when the Russian steamroller attacked.

    This all sounded eminently reasonable, but then Russia invaded Ukraine and the great power–small power dichotomy was revealed to be the opposite of realism. The fundamental problem was that Russia was exposed at the start as not a “great” power at all. Having sent in almost all of its frontline military units, the Russian army has seized only 20 percent of Ukraine—a far cry from its initial efforts to take Kyiv and subjugate the entire country—and is suffering horrific losses in casualties and equipment. It’s already desperately trying to regenerate its forces by finding soldiers wherever it can, even allowing citizens as old as 49 to enlist, while throwing more and more older, second-rate equipment into the fight.

    Russian strength has shown itself to be so overrated that it gives us an opportunity to rethink what makes a power “great.” Going into the war, Russia’s military capabilities—including a large nuclear stockpile and what was thought to be one of the biggest and most-advanced armed forces in the world—were pointed to as the reason for its strength. What this war might be showing us, however, is that a military is only as strong as the society, economy, and political structure that assembled it. In this case, Russia was nowhere near a great power, but in fact a deeply flawed, in many ways weakening, state.

    From this point of view, indeed, it can be seen as a power in relatively steep decline. Its economy is about the tenth largest in the world, comparable to Brazil’s, but even that masks how remarkably unproductive it is, basing most of its wealth on extracting and selling natural resources, rather than on producing anything advanced. When it comes to technology and innovation, Russia would hardly rank in the top 50 most important countries in the world.

    Moreover, the Russian leadership, and most obviously its president—hailed in many quarters as a canny operator—has shown itself to be the head of a disastrously constructed state that fed misperceptions, stifled real debate, and allowed one man to launch this disaster. It’s odd that this is a lesson that we need to learn again and again: Dictatorial regimes tend to decompose the longer they stay in power, because appealing to the source of power becomes a higher priority to officials in all echelons of the state than simply doing a good job. Putin’s state fed his delusions and created an inefficient military, hobbled by corruption and inefficiency.

    We must also reevaluate our understanding of the more basic notions of morale and psychological commitment. One of the most surprising things to analysts who perceived Ukraine as a small power, and Russia as a great one, is that the Ukrainian military and people have resisted with extraordinary tenacity while Russian military behavior points toward serious issues with motivation and commitment. The Ukrainians have shown a national wherewithal that has made any idea of a Russian conquest of the whole country, Putin’s original goal, laughable.

    We have seen this play out time and time again in modern history, when a smaller country—or parties within a smaller country—with a willingness to fight can wear down a larger power. Be it Afghanistan (twice) or Vietnam (twice), morale and commitment to a fight mean more than which side is the more “powerful.”

    We have much to thank the Ukrainians for, but to some extent, one of the most important things they have done is force us to reexamine many of our assumptions about national power and the balance between states.

    We need to reconsider—in many ways, entirely reconstruct—how we judge what makes a great power, or what is the most important part of national power. Militaries, perhaps, should be seen more as creations of the underlying economic, technological, and political characteristics of a country. Military power still matters hugely, but in this view reflects its creators, rather than superseding them. A weak, relatively backward, and uninventive economy will struggle to operate a modern military, even if that military has what are considered advanced weapons.

    Further, we need to be careful about praising the ability of authoritarian or dictatorial states to wage war. In times of peace, such states can seem decisive and the possessors of well-thought-out plans, but their systemic weaknesses in crushing dissent and encouraging deceptions that appeal to the throne can lead to strategic disasters in both how wars start and how they are conducted. Finally, national power has a basis in commitment and identity that cannot be overlooked.

    The Russian invasion of Ukraine has not been a situation in which a great power assaulted a smaller neighbor. It’s an example of a large, deeply flawed power invading a smaller, but very committed one. The balance of power between the two does still matter—but what makes up that balance needs to be much better understood.

    Ukraine Has Exposed Russia as a Not-So-Great Power - The Atlantic

  4. #1304
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    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    Putin won't go for that though
    It appears that a certain leader of Turkey has banned any none Black Sea country naval ships from passing through the Bosphorus Strait. There appears to be an international treaty:

    Montreux Convention Regarding the Regime of the Straits

    "The International Straits Commission was abolished, which allowed the full resumption of Turkish military control over the Straits and the refortification of the Dardanelles. Turkey was authorised to close the Straits to all foreign warships during a war or when it was threatened by aggression.

    Also, Turkey was authorised to refuse transit from merchant ships belonging to countries at war with it.
    A number of highly specific restrictions in Article 14 and 18 were imposed on what type of warships are allowed passage. Non-Black Sea powers wishing to send a vessel must notify Turkey 15 days prior to the requested passing, and Black Sea states must notify 8 days prior to passage. Also, no more than nine foreign warships, with a total aggregate tonnage of 15,000 tons, may pass at any one time. Furthermore, no single ship heavier than 10,000 tonnes can pass. An aggregate tonnage of all non-Black Sea warships in the Black Sea must be no more than 45,000 tons, with no one nation exceeding 30,000 tons at any given time, and they are permitted to stay in the Black Sea for at most 21 days. Only Black Sea states may transit capital ships of any tonnage, escorted by no more than two destroyers. Any revision to articles 14 and 18 requires 3/4 majority of signatory countries and must include Turkey.[21][22][full citation needed][23]

    Under Article 12, Black Sea states are also allowed to send submarines through the Straits with prior notice as long as the vessels have been constructed, purchased or sent for repair outside the Black Sea. The less restrictive rules applicable to Black Sea states were agreed as effectively a concession to the Soviet Union, the only Black Sea state other than Turkey with any significant number of capital ships or submarines.[20][24] The passage of civil aircraft between the Mediterranean and the Black Seas is permitted only along routes authorised by the Turkish government.[25]"

    "Although the Convention restricted the Soviets' ability to send naval forces into the Mediterranean Sea, which satisfied British concerns about Soviet intrusion into what was considered a British sphere of influence, it also ensured that outside powers could not exploit the Straits to threaten the Soviet Union.

    That was to have significant repercussions during World War II when the Montreux regime prevented the Axis powers from sending naval forces through the Straits to attack the Soviet Union.[citation needed]

    The Axis powers were thus severely limited in naval capability in their Black Sea campaigns and relied principally on small vessels that had been transported overland by rail and canal networks."

    Continues:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montre...of_the_Straits

    As the restriction are currently active, one wonders how,

    Quote Originally Posted by pickel View Post
    a UN armada protecting the shipping lanes and Ukrainian ports.
    would be authorised to ignore the treaty. One suspects Turkey would disagree and any UNSC attempt blocked by a Russian veto.

    But to NaGaStan and it's vassals, ignoring international/UNSC treaties is their SOP.

    However some news:

    1 Jul, 2022 15:51

    HomeRussia & FSU


    As West blames Moscow for 'food crisis', ships sail from Mariupol with Moscow's help while Ukraine holds vessels in its ports

    evakbartlett

    Western media and state officials keep blaming Russia for the ‘food crisis,’ but Moscow is trying to reopen Ukrainian and Donbass ports.

    "Without much notice in the West, on June 21, the first foreign ship departed from the Port of Mariupol since Ukrainian and foreign mercenary forces were fully forced out of the Donbass city a month prior. Escorted by Russian naval boats, the vessel’s departure set the precedent for a resumption of normal port activity to and from Mariupol.

    Russia’s Defense Ministry on May 20 announced the liberation of the Azovstal plant from Ukraine’s Nazi Azov Battalion, and some days later stated that sappers had demined an area of one and a half million square meters around the city’s port.
    In early June, the ministry declared the facility ready for use anew. “The de-mining of Mariupol’s port has been completed. It is functioning normally, and has received its first cargo ships,” Defense Minister Sergey Shoigu said at the time.
    Russia promised to give ships safe passage, and on June 21, the Turkish ship Azov Concord left with a Russian escort. At Mariupol port that day, prior to setting off, the captain of the ship, Ivan Babenkov, spoke to the media, telling us that the vessel, without cargo, was heading to Novorossiysk for loading, and then on to its destination.

    Rear Admiral Viktor Kochemazov, commander of the Russian naval base in Novorossiysk on the Black Sea’s northeastern coast, down the Kerch Strait from Mariupol, explained that while the corridor has been operational since May 25, the nearly one-month delay in departing was because “ships were significantly damaged during the conduct of hostilities.” Notably, he also said that some ships were deliberately damaged by Ukrainian forces in order to prevent them from leaving.

    From aboard a Russian anti-sabotage forces boat, media watched the Azov Concord leave port. Further on, the ship would be met by warships of the Novorossiysk base and escorted to the Kerch Strait where FSB border control ships would continue to escort the ship.


    A Bulgarian ship, the Tsarevna, was readying to depart the port next, “also following the same humanitarian corridor to its destination in accordance with plans for the use of the court by the owner,” Rear Admiral Kochemazov said.

    Western press ignoring development

    Predictably, just as the Western media continues to ignore Ukraine’s war crimes against the Donbass republics, including not only the bombing of houses, hospitals, and busy markets – plus the killing and maiming of civilians – so too do they omit coverage of anything positive emanating from areas where Ukrainian forces have been ousted and stability restored.

    Instead, Western media continues to spin the story that it’s Russia that’s blocking ports and preventing grain exports, and blame Moscow for “aggravating the global food crisis” – when in reality, it is Ukraine that has mined ports and burned grain storages.

    In fact, according to Russia’s Ministry of Defense, “70 foreign vessels from 16 countries remain blocked in six Ukrainian ports (Kherson, Nikolaev, Chernomorsk, Ochakov, Odessa and Yuzhniy). The threat of shelling and high mine danger posed by official Kiev prevent vessels from entering the high seas unhindered.”


    While Russia maintains it has opened two maritime humanitarian corridors in the Black and Azov Seas, Kiev is apparently not engaging with representatives of states and ship-owning companies about the departure of docked foreign ships.

    Meanwhile, in the same vein, media outlets like the New York Times (writing as always from afar) claim that Mariupol is “suffering deeply” under Russian rule (citing the runaway former mayor, nowhere near the city for months, who is the source of previous war propaganda) even describing the Azov Neo-Nazis as “the city’s last military resistance.”

    Yet, what I’ve seen in multiple trips to Mariupol in the past couple of weeks is rubble being removed so that the rebuilding process can begin, newly established street markets, public transportation running, and calm in the streets."


    https://www.rt.com/russia/558011-for...eave-mariupol/
    Last edited by OhOh; 02-07-2022 at 12:33 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  5. #1305
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Puffy is nicking Ukraine's grain. The only c u n t he's doing favours to is himself.

  6. #1306

  7. #1307
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    'A black day' Putin humiliated as Russian navy sinks its OWN ship in latest calamity

    VLADIMIR Putin was left red-faced after his naval commanders managed to sink one of their own ships in a calamitous incident.

    The Russian Navy has failed to cover itself in glory during the course of the war in Ukraine. The Black Sea Fleet suffered a major setback when its flagship, the Moskva, was sunk by Ukraine in April, after being hit by two R-360 Neptune missiles. The cruiser became the largest Russian warship to be sunk in wartime since the end of World War II and the first flagship sunk since the 1905 Russo-Japanese War.

    Now, Russian naval commanders appear to have further tarnished their reputations after inflicting a spectacular own goal.

    Reports suggest that a Black Sea Fleet landing craft was blown up after hitting a Russian mine near Mariupol.


    Twitter user "English Luhansk" wrote: "Russian navy related Telegram channel reports that the Russian Black Sea Fleet's Ondatra class landing craft D-106 hit a Russian sea mine near occupied Mariupol, calling it 'a black day'.


    Social media users showed little sympathy for the fate of the vessel and its crew as they were quick to add their own thoughts about the incident.

    One wrote: "Woohoo, The Russians are gonna help clear the mines in the Black Sea, they’re off to a great start."


    While a second said: "It hit a Russian mine… great job.

    "Russian ship starts de-mining their own mines."


    The Russian Navy is made up of four fleets - Pacific Fleet, Northern Fleet, Baltic Fleet and Black Sea Fleet.


    Additionally, it also has one flotilla that patrols the Caspian Sea.


    The Navy provides strategic deterrence through its nuclear capabilities, as well as homeland defence.


    Before hostilities broke out in Ukraine, the Russian Navy had around 130,000 personnel and roughly 32 major surface vessels.

    These included the Moskva along with two battlecruisers, 12 destroyers and 11 frigates.


    The Russian Navy also boasts an aircraft carrier, called the Admiral Kuznetsov.


    The vessel can carry approximately 24 fighter jets and 12 helicopters, as well as packing 12 P-700 anti-ship cruise missiles and almost 200 3K95 “Kinzhal” surface-to-air missiles.


    However, the carrier has been plagued by mechanical breakdowns and maintenance problems.


    It is currently undergoing repairs and modernisation work that seeks to extend its life for an additional 10 to 15 years.

    Russian military sources claim that it will be at least a year before the Admiral Kuzetsov can rejoin the combat fleet.


    A report in the Russian state media TASS said: "The transfer of the Admiral Kuznetsov cruiser to the fleet after modernisation and all subsequent state tests will take place no earlier than in 2024."

    Putin humiliated after navy sinks one of its OWN ships in latest calamity | World | News | Express.co.uk

  8. #1308
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    Ukrainian forces are having “a good deal of success” using a U.S.-given advanced rocket system to target Russian command posts, a senior U.S. defense official said Friday.

    The Ukrainians have used the High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems (HIMARS) advanced rocket system to target the Kremlin positions in its fight for the eastern region of the country known as the Donbas.

    “Because it is such a precise, longer-range system, Ukrainians are able to carefully select targets that will undermine the effort by Russia in a more systematic way, certainly than they would be able to do with the shorter-range artillery systems,” the official told reporters.

    Ukrainian forces are still in the early days of operating the HIMARS systems — four of which the U.S. has already sent to the former Soviet country and four additional it pledged late last month — as only a handful of Ukrainian troops can operate it after taking a brief training course.

    The HIMARS, which has a range of about 40 miles, has given the Ukrainians the ability to hit faraway targets with more accuracy than they have been able to prior when using shorter-ranged artillery.

    “What you see is the Ukrainians are actually systematically selecting targets and then accurately hitting them, thus providing this, you know, precise method of degrading Russian capability,” the official said.

    “I see them being able to continue to use this throughout Donbas.”

    ___________




    An activist-turned-soldier whose fingers were mangled by metal tools. Women photographed naked and forced to hold their hands above their heads or be beaten. Hospitalized prisoners of war mocked, threatened and left to die.

    The Hill spoke to a half dozen former prisoners of war and their families this month about what life was like for those captured by Russian forces since Moscow launched its invasion of Ukraine more than four months ago.

    Thousands of Ukrainians have been detained during the war, with many being exchanged for Russian prisoners of war and set free. Among them was Igor Kurayan, a 55-year-old Ukrainian activist who joined the fight against Russia and was captured in April.

    He said Russian soldiers discovered that he had been running supplies to Ukrainian soldiers on the front lines since 2014, when Russia took over Crimea, and accused him of financing terrorist organizations and preparing a terrorist attack on Russian soldiers.

    During weeks in Russian captivity, Kurayan said soldiers beat and electrocuted him for information, and twisted and cut his fingers using pliers and metal scissors. Other prisoners were beaten so badly they died, he added.

    “Every day he would be called out for the torturing and they wanted him to hand over his friends,” said a translator with PR Army, an organization that helped connect the former POWs to The Hill and translate interviews.

    “They even offered for him to become mayor of Kherson but he refused all their offers,” he added.

    The Russian forces also allegedly took Kurayan’s phone and used his social media accounts to post previous photos he took with Ukrainian forces, but adding captions making it appear that he was advocating for Ukrainian forces to surrender to Russia.

    Kurayan’s daughter, Karina, provided screenshots of some of the posts Russian soldiers made on her father’s account to The Hill. Kurayan deleted all the posts as soon as he was exchanged and free from Russian captivity.

    While Russian forces kept some captured Ukrainian soldiers in Ukraine, others were transported to Russia.

    Anzhelika Todorashko, 32, said her mother, a Ukrainian soldier, and her sister, a civilian, were captured by Russian forces shortly after the invasion began.

    Russian soldiers were able to quickly take over her small village near the Russian border, cutting off all supplies to the town and encouraging residents to take a bus to Russia, where they would be sent to a “filtration camp,” according to Todorashko, who spoke English.

    She said her mother, 52-year-old Viktoria, was captured in February for her work with the Ukrainian army, then taken to Russia where she said she was electrocuted, photographed naked, given little food and water, and heard screams from other prisoners asking for death.

    Todorashko said the Russian soldiers would humiliate prisoners, with her mother telling her that prisoners had to hold their hands above their head for hours a day, and if they dropped their hands they would be beaten. Soldiers also shaved the heads of the women and suffocated others.

    “[Russia] had all their people in masks. You will never see their faces,” Todorashko said.

    Viktoria was released weeks after being imprisoned and taken to a Ukrainian hospital only for Todorashko’s sister, Valeria, to be captured in March for 10 days as Russians worked to find any evidence she was working for the Ukrainian forces, Todorashko added.

    She was released when Russia couldn’t find any evidence of such activities.

    The Russian Embassy in Washington did not respond to questions from The Hill about the abuse and torture described by former Ukrainian prisoners.

    Twenty-five-year-old Hlib Stryszko told The Hill he was defending a bomb shelter in Mariupol shielding women and children when he was wounded by Russian forces.

    He said he was standing on a third-floor balcony when he saw a Russian tank approaching the building. The tank fired at him, causing him to fall from the third floor with debris collapsing on top of him.

    Stryszko was taken to the hospital where he found out he broke his pelvis, was unable to open his eyes and injured his jaw. He said he received treatment for his injuries, but two days later Russian forces took over the hospital and was transferred to another hospital where doctors refused to treat anyone speaking Ukrainian.

    Even after speaking Russian, Stryszko said he was hardly treated for the injuries he sustained during the blast.

    “He said that he spent about a week in the hospital without receiving the necessary help or treatment,” Natasha Sennett, another translator from the PR Army, said of Stryszko. “Basically, they were kind of sarcastically coming up to him every morning, saying ‘Hey, hang in there soldier, maybe something will come up for you.’”

    Along with the limited treatment, Stryszko said music would be blasted at the soldiers and Chechen fighters, notorious for their ruthlessness, would come into the hospital and taunt the injured.

    “They will take out their knives and take the knife and start grazing the knife on the wounded soldiers’ bodies,” Sennett said.

    Stryszko said he was eventually transported to Russia, where authorities realized he couldn’t be sent to prison due to his condition. He was eventually transported to Russian-controlled Crimea, where he was exchanged and brought to a Ukrainian hospital, where he is still recovering.

    Family members, meanwhile, went weeks not knowing whether their loved ones were dead or alive.

    “It was hell on earth,” Karina, the daughter of Kurayan, said in an interview, assisted by translator Natsya Popandopulos, another member of the nonprofit PR Army, which works to share the stories of Ukrainians with the world.

    Only Karina, who is currently in the United Kingdom, could speak out about her father’s captivity, with family members fearing their own freedom and livelihood if they spoke out.

    Todorashko, whose mother and sister were captured, said she was unaware her mother was captured by Russian forces until she was released and able to contact her. She only learned of her sister’s captivity because her younger brother, who was in the village with her sister, was able to hide a phone and message her.

    Todorashko’s brother had to hide the device because Russian soldiers would go into homes and take anything they wanted, including phones and laptops, according to Todorashko.

    “It was terrifying. It was terrifying,” Todorashko told The Hill of not being in communication with her mom and sister for so long amid the war.

    For Ukrainians in Russia-annexed Crimea, the fear and abuse was nothing new.

    Volodymyr Balukh, a 51-year-old activist, said he saw his home in Crimea overrun by Russian forces in 2014. He refused to obey orders by the soldiers, continuing to fly his Ukrainian flag and switching from speaking Russian to Ukrainian.

    He said he was running food and supplies to the Ukrainian soldiers on the front lines for years as he was arrested multiple times by Russian forces, who eventually planted ammunition and explosives at his house in an attempt to frame him as a terrorist.

    Balukh then spent three years in prison from 2016 to 2019, where he says Russian soldiers waterboarded him, stripped him naked, electrocuted him, threatened him with rape and gave him limited food.

    “In captivity, there is a struggle for modesty to preserve your honor and dignity every second, 24 hours,” said Popandopulos, one of the translators, relaying Balukh’s words. “The Russian system is built to push everything, every human being from yourself and feel only fear.”

    Today, Balukh is still trying to assist Ukraine’s war efforts and has been working to raise money for vehicles needed to defend its territory.

    After his time in Russian captivity, he had some advice to share for Ukrainians who find themselves under Russian control.

    “Endurance, faith and steadfastness are very important in captivity,” Popandopulos said for Balukh. “It’s important to know, what are you fighting for? What are you living for?”

    ____________




    The U.S. Treasury Department said Thursday it's notified the Delaware-based Heritage Trust that it's blocking more than $1 billion in assets linked to the sanctioned Russian oligarch Suleiman Kerimov.

    Why it matters: The U.S. and other governments are intensifying efforts to financially squeeze oligarchs with ties to Russian President Vladimir Putin due to the invasion of Ukraine.

    Driving the news: "Heritage Trust was formed in July 2017 for the purpose of holding and managing Kerimov's U.S.-based assets," per a Treasury Department statement.


    • "Kerimov has retained a property interest in Heritage Trust following his designation, which results in Heritage Trust being blocked," the U.S. Treasury said.
    • Kerimov's nephew Ruslan Gadzhiyevich Gadzhiyev, whom the U.S. sanctioned in March, has been a beneficiary of the trust and "his continuing property interest in Heritage Trust provides a separate and independent basis for Heritage Trust to be blocked," according to the department.


    By the numbers: The Treasury Department announced Wednesday that a multinational task had blocked or frozen more than $30 billion worth of sanctioned Russians' assets and funds.

    The big picture: The U.S. Treasury has designated Kerimov, a member of the upper house of Russian parliament with links to Putin, as an official in the Russian government and sanctioned him in 2018 for alleged money laundering and tax evasion both in the United States and the European Union.


    • A seized superyacht that U.S. officials say is linked to Kerimov arrived in San Diego Bay this week and will remain in the custody of the U.S. government, pending its anticipated forfeiture and sale, according to the Justice Department.


    What they're saying: "Treasury continues using the full range of our tools to expose and disrupt those who seek to evade our sanctions and hide their ill-gotten gains," Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said in a statement.

    "Even as Russian elites hide behind proxies and complex legal arrangements, Treasury will use our broad enforcement authorities, as well as our partnerships through the REPO Task Force, to actively implement the multilaterally coordinated sanctions imposed on those who fund and benefit from Russia’s war against Ukraine."

    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    Russia remains strong despite 'insane' sanctions
    Last edited by S Landreth; 03-07-2022 at 02:39 AM.
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  9. #1309
    Thailand Expat russellsimpson's Avatar
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    The Montreux Convention was actually generated by the end of WW1 and at best is very dated. Has the damn thing ever been re-done? Probably not in a major way. Turkey is a far different nation with Erdowan.

    Instead of exchanging gruesome war stories I suggest some of you gentlemen start thinking about how this fucking thing will end.
    A true diplomat is a person who can tell you to go to hell in such a manner that you will be asking for directions.

  10. #1310
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    Quote Originally Posted by russellsimpson View Post
    Instead of exchanging gruesome war stories I suggest some of you gentlemen start thinking about how this fucking thing will end.


    You think Teakdoor posters can effect peace in Ukraine? Put down the pipe Russ.

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    Russia claims to have taken key city of Lysychansk

    • Russian and separatist forces in eastern Ukraine have taken the city of Lysychansk, Russia's defences ministry says
    • Its defence minister has told Russian President Vladimir Putin that all of Ukraine's Luhansk region has been 'liberated'
    • But, Ukrainian defence ministry spokesman Yuriy Sak has told the BBC that Lysychansk is not under the "full control" of Russian forces
    • He added the situation in the city has been "very intense for quite a while now" with Russian ground forces "attacking the city non-stop"
    • The mayor of Slovyansk, Vadym Lyakh, says the city - lying further west - has been shelled by the Russians; at least six have been killed
    • At least three people have been killed in several explosions in the Russian city of Belgorod, a regional governor says
    • Vyacheslav Gladkov says dozens of residential buildings were damaged in the blasts. This hasn't been independently confirmed




    Seizing the city of Slovyansk is a key part of the Russian plan to control the entire Donbas region.

    As the BBC's Paul Kirby explains, Slovyansk is on the strategic M03 motorway, and the city of 125,000 people was captured by Russian-backed forces in 2014, before Ukrainian forces seized it back. Capturing Kramatorsk, just to the south, is also a big objective.

    It is the next city in the Russian push westwards in Donbas, after the bitter fighting for Severodonetsk and Lysychansk.

    Most Donbas residents have historically close ties to Russia and are Russian-speaking. The region is dominated by heavy industry, especially coal and steel.

    Just before he launched the war, President Vladimir Putin recognised all of Luhansk and Donetsk - together known as Donbas - as independent of Ukraine, not just the limited statelets created by Moscow-backed proxies in 2014. That recognition was condemned internationally.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/live/world-europe-62022073


  12. #1312
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Just before he launched the war, President Vladimir Putin recognised all of Luhansk and Donetsk - together known as Donbas - as independent of Ukraine
    That's nice. Makes invasion justified. Rumor has it Mexico is going to declare California independent of the US and invade soon. Discrimintion against the large Spanish speaking population is well known so Mexico must "liberate" them from this tyanny.

  13. #1313
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ^ They should go for it, too! Thirty percent of Californians are Spanish speakers anyway. That makes it rightfully Mexico’s. Besides, California has a lot more money, industry, and good roads .

  14. #1314
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    They must be getting nervous in Brighton Beach.

  15. #1315
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    They must be getting nervous in Brighton Beach.
    You bet. Folks at local church praying they avoid liberation.

    Russia launches Ukraine invasion-ro_transfig_cathedral_greenpoint_jeh-jpg

  16. #1316
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Ukrainian forces are set to raise the country’s flag on Snake Island, a strategic and symbolic outpost in the Black Sea that Russian troops retreated from last week after months of heavy bombardment.

    “The military operation has been concluded, and … the territory, Snake Island, has been returned to the jurisdiction of Ukraine,” Natalia Humeniuk, a spokesperson for Ukraine’s southern military command, told reporters.

    Ukraine’s military earlier stated that the national flag had been returned to the island shortly before 11pm on Monday. “On the island of Zmiiny, the Ukrainian flag was returned again,” an update read.

    However, a clarification was later issued confirming the flag had been delivered by helicopter and would be raised as soon as Ukrainian troops arrive on the island.

    __________



    It’s not the United States’ role to push Ukraine to negotiate a settlement with Russia, even if the Biden administration thought that it was the right thing to do, John Kirby said Sunday.

    “It’s time for the United States to continue to support Ukraine, and that’s what we are doing,” the National Security Council coordinator for strategic communications said.

    Speaking to Mike Emanuel on “Fox News Sunday,” Kirby said it will always be Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy’s call as to if and when to seek a negotiated settlement with President Vladimir Putin and Russia.

    “President Zelenskyy,” Kirby said, “he gets to determine how victory is decided and when and on what terms. And [what] we’re going to do is continue to make sure that can succeed on the battlefield so that he can succeed at the table. But even President Zelenskyy will tell you that the time is not now for those discussions.”

    Russian troops continue to attempt to push forward, slowly and at great cost in human lives, in Ukraine’s east and also have launched recent raids on Kyiv and other cities.

    But as other Biden administration officials have done since Russia launched what Putin intended as a lightning-fast invasion in February, Kirby said Ukraine has done a much better job fending off Russian invaders than anyone thought possible.

    “The Ukrainians are fighting really bravely and skillfully, Mike, and they’re not only working to defend territory — and they have done a noble job of that — they’re going on the counteroffensive,” Kirby said.

    _____________




    Australia’s prime minister, Anthony Albanese, has pledged more than A$100m in fresh military aid for Ukraine, after visiting the sites of some of the most infamous atrocities of Russia’s war during the final leg of a European tour.

    Albanese visited Bucha, Hostomel and Irpin, three towns in the Kyiv region that became synonymous with the brutality of Vladimir Putin’s invasion when evidence of mass killings and torture was uncovered after the withdrawal of Russian forces.

    The governor of the Kyiv region, Oleksii Kuleba, announced the visit on Facebook, saying Albanese had been shocked at what he saw, including bombed-out homes, traces of mines and a destroyed airport.

    Albanese announced additional $99.5m in military aid, which will include:

    • 14 armoured personnel carriers,
    • 20 Bushmaster protected mobility vehicles and other military equipment;
    • a contribution to Nato’s Ukraine Comprehensive Assistance Package Trust Fund;
    • and $8.7m to assist Ukraine’s Border Guard Service to upgrade border management equipment, cybersecurity and border operations in the field.


    ____________




    Ukrainian officials including President Volodymyr Zelensky wished the U.S. a happy Independence Day on Monday as the nation fights for its own independence against the ongoing Russian invasion.

    “I appreciate the leadership assistance of the United States in Ukraine’s defending of common values — freedom, democracy and independence,” Zelensky tweeted, wishing Americans and President Biden a happy July 4th.

    The U.S. has made supporting Ukraine a cornerstone of its foreign policy since Russia invaded the country on Feb. 24. Washington has committed $6.9 billion in security assistance since Russia’s invasion began, uniting Western nations against the move and bringing tensions with Moscow to a boiling point not seen since the Cold War.

    “Happy 4th or July to all our American friends and thanks for standing with us in the darkest hour. Together, we will prevail,” the Ukraine government’s official Twitter account said.

    The Ukrainian military orchestra on Monday released a video of the group performing the U.S. national anthem, sung in English, in honor of the holiday.

    “Dear American friends, we appreciate all the support we receive from the United States, and today we sincerely wish you happy Independence Day,” an unnamed uniformed military official said in the video following the group’s performance.

    The gesture was one of many from the Ukrainian military.

    “On behalf of the Armed Forces of Ukraine and on my own behalf, I convey my heartfelt wishes to the American people on the anniversary of the United States Declaration of Independence,” Valerii Zaluzhnyi, the commander-in-chief of Ukraine’s armed forces, wrote in a Facebook post.

    “I wish you every success in your future endeavors, prosperity, much happiness and robust health,” he continued.

    The general staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine also marked July 4 in a post.

    “Happy 4th or July to all our American friends and thanks for standing with us in the darkest hour,” the Ukrainian government’s official account tweeted on Monday. “Together, we will prevail.”



    ____________



    UK foreign secretary Liz Truss has said that her country wants to follow the example of Canada and seize the assets of Russians in the UK in order to give them to Ukraine.

    It comes as the foreign secretary is due to give a speech on Monday (July 4) to a Ukraine reconstruction conference in Lugano, Switzerland, which will be attended either in person or virtually by most of Ukraine’s senior political leadership, the Guardian reported.

    It is estimated that more than 120,000 homes in Ukraine have been destroyed during the Russian invasion, creating the need for billions in income to restore the country economically and make it a Europe-faced economy.

    Truss told MPs last week she was supportive of the idea that the government could seize frozen Russian assets in the UK and redistribute them to victims of Russia’s war in Ukraine.

    She said: “I am supportive of the concept. We are looking at it very closely. The Canadians have in fact just passed legislation This is an issue that we are working on jointly with the Home Office and the Treasury, but I certainly agree with the concept. We just need to get the specifics of it right.”

    She said the initiative would “most probably” need legislation but not necessarily.

    The funds seized could be supplied either to individuals in a form of reparations or to the Ukrainian state. At present the UK can suspend Russian assets under the Economic Crime Act for 56 days and roll over the suspension for a further 56 days. In that period the owner of the asset cannot benefit from the asset in any way.

    In her speech to the conference, Truss will claim the UK will position itself as Ukraine’s key partner in the recovery process and claim it has already offered $1.5bn to the country through multilateral loan guarantees and more than £100m in bilateral support.

    She will say: “Ukraine’s recovery from Russia’s war of aggression will be a symbol of the power of democracy over autocracy. It will show [Vladimir] Putin that his attempts to destroy Ukraine have only produced a stronger, more prosperous and more united nation.

    “The UK is resolute in its support of Ukraine’s territorial integrity and will remain at Ukraine’s side as it emerges as a strong, thriving and cutting-edge democracy. We have led on support for Ukraine during the war and will continue to lead in supporting the Ukrainian government’s reconstruction and development plan.”

    UK and France vow to support Ukraine in war for freedom

    The Foreign Office said: “Humanitarian assistance and de-mining programmes will help rebuild villages, towns and cities, and in the longer term the UK will share economic and financial expertise to transform Ukraine into a global hub for investment, enterprise and cutting-edge technology. The UK will champion the recovery of the city of Kyiv and the Kyiv region, on the request of President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.”

    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    Russia remains strong despite 'insane' sanctions
    Last edited by S Landreth; 05-07-2022 at 02:59 PM.

  17. #1317
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    They both look like idiots and ugly as shit!

  18. #1318
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Russia Approves Bill Recognizing Civilians Sent to Ukraine War as Veterans


    Russia’s lower house of parliament has passed new legislation giving civilians who have contributed to Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine the same status as war veterans.


    The legislation will include doctors, technical specialists, construction workers and journalists who have worked with Russian troops in occupied areas of Ukraine, according to lawmakers.

    Veteran status gives the holder tax and transport privileges and state assistance with accommodation and health care. War veterans also receive monthly payments from the government.


    The legislation, which must now be passed by Russia’s upper house and signed by President Vladimir Putin, was approved amid Moscow’s latest campaign to recruit essential workers for the “reconstruction” of occupied areas of eastern Ukraine. In return for traveling to the region, workers are reportedly promised a benefits package including meals and housing, paid vacation time and “career growth” opportunities.


    President Vladimir Putin signed a law conferring veteran status to all Russian soldiers fighting in Ukraine in March.

    The Moscow Times

  19. #1319
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    How very "Mugabe".


  20. #1320
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    Russia-Ukraine war: Putin’s forces have made ‘genuine headway’ after capturing Lysychansk, say western officials


    Russia has made ‘genuine headway’ after capturing Lysychansk, say western officials

    The capture of the city of Lysychansk in eastern Ukraine by Russian forces has meant Moscow has made “genuine headway”, while its forces in the south have shown signs of “better cooperation”, western officials said.

    Western officials said the sustainability of Russia’s attacks on Ukraine was “challenging”, but described the impact on their munitions and morale as “remarkable”.
    But one official said it “remains highly uncertain whether Russia will secure the limits of Donetsk oblast this year”.

    Russia has made “some significant command changes” in recent weeks, one official said, notably the recently appointed Gen Sergei Surovikin, who has taken over command of the southern group of forces overseeing the occupation of southern Ukraine and the advances on the Donbas from the south.
    The official said:


    He’s a controversial figure even by the standards of Russian general officers. It is unclear whether it’s his influence which has led to the recent successes around Lysychansk, but certainly there’s been better cooperation amongst groups of forces on the Russian side than we saw in the earlier phases of the war.

    There are “very serious issues” over the stocks of Russian munitions and of morale, an official said, while long-range weapons systems are starting to make a “significant operational difference for Ukraine”.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2022/jul/06/russia-ukraine-war-live-news-donetsk-governor-urges-evacuations-amid-russian-offensive

  21. #1321
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    Ukraine’s American-Made Rockets Are Blowing Up Russia’s Ammo Dumps

    The Ukrainian army systematically is demolishing Russian ammunition supplies. The strategy could have big implications as Russia’s wider war in Ukraine grinds into its fourth month.

    Firing new, American-supplied GPS-guided rockets—plus a few old, ex-Soviet ballistic missiles—the army in just the last two weeks has targeted no fewer than a dozen Russian ammo dumps.

    The Ukrainians have concentrated their ammo strikes in the east, where Kyiv’s brigades have been staging a fighting withdrawal west along a 40-mile-deep pocket of Ukrainian-held terrain anchored in the east at Siversk.

    On June 16, Kyiv’s forces blew up an ammo dump in Krasny Luch. Strikes on ammo stockpiles in Iyzum and Svatove followed on June 25. Two days later they hit dumps in Zymohiria and Rodakove. Ukrainian troops hit Russian ammo supplies in Perevalsk on June 28 and in Stakhanov on June 30. July 4 was a banner day for attacks on munitions stocks in Snijne and Donetsk.

    Not to be outdone, Ukrainian forces in the south hit a Russian ammo dump at Melitopol airport on July 3.

    To be clear, Ukrainian and Russian forces have targeted each other’s logistical infrastructure since Russia widened its war on Ukraine on Feb. 23. But the Ukrainians have stepped up their raids in recent weeks—and they’re getting more accurate, too, as more Western-made rockets arrive at the front lines.

    The first four American-made High-Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems—truck-mounted, six-round launchers for 44-mile-range, GPS-guided rockets—reached the eastern front the last week of June. Not coincidentally, that’s when the Ukrainians narrowed their focus on Russia’s ammo supplies.

    The wheeled HIMARS shoot farther, faster and more accurately than Ukraine’s ex-Soviet rocket-launchers can do. Traveling along roads and firing mostly at night, the four HIMARS are having an effect that’s entirely out of proportion to their small numbers.

    “We're watching Ukraine's use of the HIMARS,” an unnamed U.S. defense official told reporters, “and we're seeing them having a good deal of success in employing these—these HIMARS.”
    Russian logistical nodes 30 miles or farther from the front, which once were relatively safe from Ukrainian attack, now frequently come under fire.

    “The Ukrainians are able to carefully select targets that will undermine, you know, the effort by Russia in a more systematic way, certainly more than they would be able to do with the shorter range artillery systems,” a different, unnamed U.S. official added.

    Russian deep strikes meanwhile are getting less accurate as the Russians draw down their pre-war stockpiles of modern missiles. The Russian armed forces don’t possess a wheeled rocket-launcher with the speed and accuracy of HIMARS, but they do possess a wide array of air-launched, long-range guided missiles.

    But the Russians have fired so many hundreds of their best missiles that they’re now running low. More and more, Russian air force bombers are lobbing old and inaccurate missiles—and missing their targets as often as they hit them.

    On June 27, a Russian bomber crew fired what appeared to be a Kh-32 anti-ship missile—which has a secondary land-attack role—at Kremenchuk in southern Ukraine. It’s unclear what the crew was aiming for. There are industrial and logistical sites in Kremenchuk that have military value.

    In any event, the Kh-32—an upgraded version of a 1960s-vintage weapon—struck a shopping mall, killing 20 people.

    It’s likely more Ukrainian civilians will die as Russia’s strikes get less accurate. “Russia’s shortage of more modern precision strike weapons and the professional shortcomings of their targeting planners will highly likely result in further civilian casualties,” the U.K. Defense Ministry explained.

    Ukraine’s own deep strikes meanwhile are getting more accurate as more launchers arrive from foreign donors. Four more ex-American HIMARS are on the way. The Ukrainians also are getting 18 tracked Multiple Launch Rocket Systems from the United States, Germany, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom and Norway.

    The MLRS are somewhat less nimble and reliable than the HIMARS are, but their rockets are the same—and travel just as far and strike just as accurately.

    The Ukrainians also are squeezing every possible mile they can from the HIMARS and MLRS’s GPS-guided M31 rockets. Forty-four miles is the official max range, but with careful planning it’s possible to squeeze an extra six miles from the rockets.

    Indeed, the HIMARS launcher that blew up the Russian ammo dump at Melitopol on July 3 apparently did so from 50 miles away.

    As strikes escalate and losses mount, Russian logisticians could struggle to keep front-line units adequately supplied. Don’t underestimate how heavily this could weigh on the Russian war effort.
    Ukraine’s interdiction of Russia’s supply lines after all doomed the Russian army’s attempt to encircle Kyiv back in February and March. Zeroing in on ammo dumps deep inside Russian-held territory, the Ukrainians clearly are hoping to repeat that winning strategy.

    https://www.forbes.com/sites/davidax...h=2ba30ea71e0f

  22. #1322
    Guest Member S Landreth's Avatar
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    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canada on Tuesday became the first NATO member to formally approve applications by Finland and Sweden to join the alliance.

    Trudeau is now urging other allies to move quickly to finalize their own ratification processes.

    “This brings the two countries a step closer to full membership,” he said in a statement. “Their membership will make NATO stronger.”

    Helsinki and Stockholm applied to join NATO in May, less than two months after Russia’s full-blown invasion of Ukraine.

    Canada’s blessing Tuesday to bring the Nordic countries into NATO’s fold was accelerated last month by the House of Commons’ unanimous support for their membership.

    The Canadian step also followed the move last week by NATO ally Turkey to lift its objection to the countries’ applications.

    Turkey, Finland and Sweden signed a memorandum of understanding ahead of the NATO summit in Madrid. The agreement came in response to Ankara’s concerns over the countries’ alleged support for Kurdish groups and arms embargoes.

    The parliaments of each individual NATO country must ratify the alliance’s additions of Finland and Sweden.

    NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg declined last week to offer a precise timeline on when the countries will officially join the group.

    “We call on all NATO members to move swiftly to complete their ratification processes to limit opportunities for interference by adversaries,” Trudeau’s statement said Tuesday.

    ___________



    Latvian Defense Minister Artis Pabriks on Tuesday said the Baltic state will reinstate compulsory military service following growing tension with neighboring Russia amid Moscow’s war in Ukraine.

    “The current military system of Latvia has reached its limit. Meanwhile we have no reason to think that Russia will change its behavior,” Pabriks told reporters.

    Latvia had scrapped mandatory service a few years after joining the NATO defense alliance. Since 2007, the EU member’s military has consisted of career soldiers along with National Guard volunteers who serve in the infantry part-time on weekends.

    The country of under two million people, which borders both Belarus and Russia, currently only has 7,500 active duty soldiers and National Guard members, backed by 1,500 NATO troops.

    Pabriks said the mandatory military service will apply to men and enter into effect next year, with several options available for fulfilling the requirement.

    Gatis Priede, a National Guard soldier, called the move “the best news” and said the decision should have been taken after Russia annexed Crimea in 2014.

    “This is the right thing — to train more reservists for our army and for overall NATO strength, which is still critically lacking in the Northern European and Baltic region,” he told AFP.

    Pabriks also announced plans to build another military base near the southeastern city of Jekabpils, located closer to the Russian border than the existing Adazi base.

    ____________


    • Stratcom Centre UA - russian invaders have occupied around 22% of all Ukraine's arable land — NASA

    #StopRussia: https://twitter.com/StratcomCentre/s...58081321680897

    ____________




    Turkey has detained a Russian cargo ship carrying grain that Ukraine says is stolen, Kyiv's ambassador in Ankara said.

    “We have full co-operation,” Vasyl Bodnar said on Ukrainian national television on Sunday. “The ship is currently standing at the entrance to the port. It has been detained by the customs authorities of Turkey.”

    Ukraine had asked Turkey to detain the Russian-flagged Zhibek Zholy cargo ship. The vessel was anchored about a kilometre from shore, near Karasu port, on Sunday, an official told Reuters.

    The report said there had been no obvious signs of movement aboard the vessel.

    The fate of the 7,146-deadweight-tonne ship will be decided when investigators meet on Monday, with Ukraine hoping that Turkish authorities confiscate the grain, Mr Bodnar said.

    Ukraine has accused Russia of stealing grain from territories it has seized since its invasion began in late February. The Kremlin has denied the claims.

    A Ukrainian Foreign Ministry official told Reuters on Friday that the Zhibek Zholy loaded its first cargo of about 4,500 tonnes of grain from Berdyansk, a Russian-occupied port in south Ukraine.

    The region's Sakarya port authority and Turkey's foreign ministry did not immediately comment, Reuters reported.

    The BBC said it had tracked the Russian-flagged ship on its route from the port of Berdyansk, in Ukraine's southern Zaporizhzhia region, to Karasu on the Turkish Black Sea coast.

    The ship's departure from Berdyansk was announced by Yevhen Balytskyi, Russia's recently appointed governor of the occupied areas of Zaporizhzhia, on social media app Telegram. He said 7,000 tonnes of grain would be sent to “friendly” countries and ships — later editing the post to remove references to the ship's cargo and destination.

    He said in the post that Russia's Black Sea Fleet would “ensure the security” of the journey and that the port had been cleared of sea mines.

    The BBC said it had confirmed a video news report shared on several pro-Russia Telegram channels in which a reporter claimed the ship, along with a Russian naval vessel, was in a harbour in Berdyansk.

    Kazakh-based company KTZ Express had previously confirmed to Reuters it owned the Zhibek Zholy, but said it was taken under a bare boat charter — when no crew or supplies are involved in the lease — by Russian company Green-Line, which was not designated under any sanctions.

    KTZ Express said it was consulting the parties involved and would abide by all sanctions and restrictions.

    Large stores of grain are in danger of rotting in Ukrainian silos, with July’s harvest set to make the problem even more urgent.

    Ukraine previously supplied 10 per cent of the world’s wheat, up to 17 per cent of the world’s maize and half of the world’s sunflower oil. About 25 million tonnes of corn and wheat is at risk of rotting in Ukrainian silos.

    Last month, the UK offered to help grain exports leave Ukrainian ports under a UN plan as Foreign Secretary Liz Truss accused Vladimir Putin of “using food security as a callous tool of war”.

    Russia’s Ship of Lies: How a cargo of ‘stolen’ grain could sink Black Sea truce

    __________________

    • Dutch court backs contract termination over Russian sanctions


    A court in the Netherlands has backed the decision of a Dutch-owned Russian company to terminate a contract associated with a liquid natural gas (LNG) project in Russia on the basis that performance of the contract would breach EU sanctions regulations.

    Amsterdam-based Frederik Harms of Pinsent Masons said that the ruling could have implications for other cases being heard in the Netherlands where the application of EU sanctions concerning Russia is in dispute.

    In this case Boskalis LLC (Boskalis) – a Russian subsidiary of the Dutch owned company – was sub-contracted to undertake dredging of the seabed in Russian waters for the purposes of supporting the subsequent construction of an LNG terminal. Dutch company Saren B.V. (Saren) had sub-contracted the works to Boskalis.

    However, after Russia invaded Ukraine earlier this year, Boskalis notified Saren that it was terminating the contract between them. It claimed that performing the works would be in breach of EU sanctions regulations, which had been updated after Russia’s invasion commenced.

    Much more in the article but in the end.......

    The Court of Amsterdam concluded that Boskalis was entitled to stop its activities and terminate the sub-contract with Saren.

    The court also considered that it is sufficiently plausible, once all the arguments are fully heard in trial proceedings, that both a request for payment under the bank guarantees as well as a granting of that request will be considered unlawful, on the basis that it would breach the EU Russian sanctions regulation. It granted interim relief to Boskalis in relation to the bank guarantees after identifying that there was legitimate urgency to prevent a call on the bank guarantees at this stage because of the difficulties Boskalis would face in subsequently retrieving the payments made under the bank guarantees if Saren’s claims were dismissed at trial.

    https://www.pinsentmasons.com/out-la...sian-sanctions

    Quote Originally Posted by David48atTD View Post
    Russia remains strong despite 'insane' sanctions

  23. #1323
    Chinese spy sabang's Avatar
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    Putin Says Peace Talks With Ukraine Will Be Harder With Time

    The Russian leader warned the West can't defeat Russia
    by Dave DeCamp Posted onJuly 7, 2022CategoriesNewsTagsRussia, Ukraine

    Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday said the longer the war in Ukraine drags on, the harder it will be to reach a negotiated solution and warned the West against trying to defeat Russia.


    “We aren’t giving up on peace talks but those who decline to talk should know that the longer they do so, the harder it will be to come to an agreement with us,” Putin said, according to the Russian news agency Tass.


    Early on in the war, Russia and Ukraine held several rounds of negotiations. Russia asked that Ukraine drop its claim to Crimea and recognize the independence of the breakaway Donbas republics, among other demands.


    But since the peace talks have stalled, Russia has gained more territory in the Donbas, as well as in the oblasts of Kherson and Zaporizhzhia, giving Ukraine much less leverage. Western leaders have discouraged Ukraine from negotiating with Russia, most notably Boris Johnson, who resigned as British prime minister on Thursday.


    According to a report from Ukrainska Pravda, Johnson told Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky during a visit to Kyiv in April that “even if Ukraine is ready to sign some agreements on guarantees with Putin,” Ukraine’s Western backers were not. The exact details of the Ukrainska Pravda report haven’t been confirmed, but Johnson later told French President Emmanuel Macron that he “urged” the Ukrainians not to negotiate with Russia.


    Putin on Thursday also responded to President Biden and other Western leaders that have called for Russia’s defeat in Ukraine. “We are hearing these days that they want to defeat us on the battlefield. What can you say? Let them try,” the Russian leader said.


    “We have heard many times that the West wants to fight us to the last Ukrainian. This is a tragedy for the Ukrainian people, but it seems that everything is heading towards this,” Putin added. The Russian leader also signaled that he could expand the war further, warning that “we haven’t started anything yet in earnest.”

    https://news.antiwar.com/2022/07/07/...der-with-time/


  24. #1324
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    A lying c u n t being quoted by an obsequious brown noser.

  25. #1325
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    According to a report from Ukrainska Pravda, Johnson told Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky during a visit to Kyiv in April that “even if Ukraine is ready to sign some agreements on guarantees with Putin,” Ukraine’s Western backers were no
    If this is all true then it is very revealing and prompts the inevitable question of why.

    There is no way in the world that Ukraine is going to win this conflict. It's clear that this is part of a longer term American policy to conduct a proxy war with Russia. Possibly to degrade the Russian military. Possibly to give a needed boost to the armament industry in the USA, France and Great Britain (primarily).

    Unfortunately the price for continuing the battle is going to be the (lack of)future of Ukraine in the form of it's disappeared youth.

    As long as this war continues with the sanctions and all, the more likely it is that the west is going to end up in a recession with a growing possibility of a depression.

    Just trying to be realistic here. I'm not sure what the long term answers are only that this bloodletting must end. Ukraine is heading for rump status and is even risking being landlocked.

    Blinken go fuck yourself.

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