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  1. #101
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    No wonder in a state where even the small kids are not allowed to be showed naked when bathing...


    What the actual fuck.
    Last edited by AntRobertson; 20-06-2021 at 11:05 AM.

  2. #102
    Thailand Expat lom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Posted outside Russia for 5 years you sad cvnt
    are you saying that he was not a KGB-agent from the time he joined KGB (1975) until he was posted to Dresden with majors rank in 1985?

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    Nobody: …
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    What the actual fuck.
    Do you not see the futility in debating with someone whose idea of a holiday is his annual pilgramage to Stalins memorial recalling "the good old days" under uncle Joe with his mates over a few bottles of Vodka?

  4. #104
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    The guy is having a monumental breakdown in many threads . . . now he's talking about naked children bathing . . . what an utter freak.



    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    are you saying that he was not a KGB-agent from the time he joined KGB (1975) until he was posted to Dresden with majors rank in 1985?
    I doubt he even knows what he's saying at this stage

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by lom View Post
    are you saying that he was not a KGB-agent from the time he joined KGB (1975) until he was posted to Dresden with majors rank in 1985?
    So what? Aren't others CIA directors? Is it more than a major? OK, director but for a good purpose, wasn't he?

    Actually, also the previous State Secy, wasn't he CIA director? There are so many but we speak just about one major in Dresden.

    BTW, what did he do wrong in Dresden, do you know about some discoveries? (but something else, not just killing people, that's boring...)

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    So what?
    Nice try . . . the response was to socal's saying he wasn't. Your whataboutism isn't relevant here as the discussion was/is Putin.

    Try not to deflect in every one of your posts.



    So: was he or not? The answer is 'yes'. Not, "so what".



    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    Do you not see the futility in debating with someone whose idea of a holiday is his annual pilgramage to Stalins memorial recalling "the good old days" under uncle Joe with his mates over a few bottles of Vodka?
    Frightening thought.


    Nothing wrong with having political leanings one way or the other - we all have our ideas. Supporting murder and subjugation is wrong <don't insert any names here as we know what we're talking about>. This isn't some obscure place in time - it is actual support during the times.

  7. #107
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Posted outside Russia for 5 years you sad cvnt
    Why are you so stupid?

  8. #108
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Posted outside Russia for 5 years you sad cvnt
    Russian people will piss and shit on Putin's grave!

  9. #109
    Thailand Expat helge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HermantheGerman View Post
    Russian people will piss and shit on Putin's grave!
    Maybe they will and should

    Do they piss and shit on Stalin's "grave" ?

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by helge View Post
    Do they piss and shit on Stalin's "grave" ?
    Murdering roughly 20 million of 'his own' people . . . they should

  11. #111
    Thailand Expat helge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    they should
    Ofcourse

    But do they ?

  12. #112
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    No idea, I'm neither Russian or do I live there.

    Nostalgia for the UdSSR and Stalin are growing and allowed to grow under Putin, they were a 'great power' on the surface, finally not being ridiculed as the 'sick man' of Europe any longer

  13. #113
    Thailand Expat helge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    No idea, I'm neither Russian or do I live there.
    Same for me and...Herman

    My guess is :

    Pissing on graves isn't something we humans waste time on
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    UdSSR

    Old habits and all

  14. #114
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    Hehehe . . . on purpose, I was wondering if you'd catch that.

  15. #115
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Murdering roughly 20 million of 'his own' people . . . they should

    French casualties Napoleonic Wars



    Estimates of the total French losses during the wars vary from 500,000 to 3 million dead. According to David Gates, the Napoleonic Wars cost France at least 916,000 men from 1803 to 1815. This represents 38% of the conscription class of 1790–1795.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    French
    Putin/SU/Russia . . . do try to keep up, as difficult as it may be.


    I'll hep you along a little bit more as those with special needs require it:



    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Murdering roughly 20 million of 'his own' people . . . they should
    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    38% of the conscription class of 1790–1795.
    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    916,000 men
    Notice anything, Backspit?

  17. #117
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    Fizz is gone from Biden-Putin summit

    June 21, 2021 by M. K. BHADRAKUMAR

    "The morning after a Russian-American summit is most critical to know whether the previous day’s bonhomie was real, surreal or unreal. Surveying the Geneva Summit (June 16) between presidents Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin, I cautiously assessed the next day, “Does Biden have the political capital to press ahead with a project to create “stability and predictability” in US-Russia relations? Clearly, it is too early to say this summit was a success for Biden or not. Weeks and months may be needed to see how the US-Russia relationship develops. One summit in Geneva cannot transform the relationship.” (Takeaways from Biden-Putin summit, Indian Punchline)

    Three days later, the event is cresting around the edges. It indicates a chemical burn and may cause extensive tissue damage.

    Putin probably had some premonition. His effusive remarks about Biden on a personal note on Thursday, immediately after returning to Moscow, had added a caveat, “I do hope that we will not see a rerun of the previous years and he (Biden) will have a chance to work calmly.” read more

    The Kremlin is immensely experienced in dealing with America. Thus, Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov sounded an early warning on Friday that his experienced eyes could discern a certain degree of retraction already in “the assessments of US officials, including the participants of the talks, on the outcomes of the Geneva talks.”

    With characteristic frankness, Lavrov chastised those folks, “This is not the approach that the presidents talked about. I want those who comment on the results of the summit in such a way to hear this: ‘This will not be a one-way street.’ ” read more

    However, on Sunday, the CNN aired an explosive interview with National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan who announced that “we are preparing another package of sanctions to apply” on the Kremlin’s handling of the highly sensitive issue of the Russian opposition activist Alexei Navalny and, furthermore, that Washington shall “continue to apply every 90 days sanctions against Russian entities involved in the construction of Nord Stream II (gas pipeline.)” read more [0909]

    The Russian Ambassador to the US Anatoly Antonov (who just returned to Washington) promptly noted, “This is not a signal we all expected after the summit. I don’t think it is possible to stabilise and normalise relations between countries by means of sanctions. The current task is to normalise dialogue. First of all, we need to restore wrecked dialogue mechanisms.” read more

    The Russian foreign ministry spokesperson Maria Zakharova has since promised a “logical response.” Of course, the CNN interview with Sullivan was carefully choreographed. He was invited to react to the pervasive scepticism in the Beltway that Biden was naive to put faith in Putin’s words.

    It all boils down to the political environment in the US where the Democratic Party’s campaign against former President Donald Trump being a Manchurian candidate at the beck and call of the Kremlin struck deep roots in the public consciousness and draws nourishment from the latent Russophobia in the subsoil. Putin’s Russia is a highly toxic subject in the US’ foreign-policy discourses.

    None other than Hillary Clinton underscored the vehement rejection of any sort of engagement with Putin’s Russia by the Biden presidency. Clinton made it highly personal:

    “I think that (Biden’s) long history with foreign relations, his eight years as vice president seeing what worked, what didn’t work, watching the disaster of the Trump presidency in basically giving a green light to Putin to do whatever he wanted – once he helped elect Trump, of course – I think you’ll see a much different approach.”

    Clinton was speaking on the day of the Geneva Summit. Being an inveterate crusader against Putin’s Russia, and considering that both Sullivan and Secretary of State Antony Blinken are her proteges, Clinton’s opinions carry weight. read more

    Unsurprisingly, Clinton’s remarks were not countered by any US official. But Sullivan tore into Mike Pompeo when the latter called Biden “weak on Russia.”

    What lies ahead? A standstill is inevitably a rollback when it comes to US-Russia ties. Some incipient signs are there already. Take Afghanistan or Myanmar, where Biden hopes to extract some Russian help.

    At a media briefing on Thursday, Zakharova plainly ridiculed the US move to hire the Turkish military to operate the Kabul International Airport and instead suggested “that the final decision on this score should be adopted in a level-headed manner, proceeding, among other things, from the aims of promoting the process of intra-Afghan national reconciliation.”

    Washington is now considering the hiring of Pentagon contractors (mercenaries) to secure Kabul airport. But that will be a hugely controversial step with grave consequences, as apparent from Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan’s brusque rejection of the very idea of American military presence on Pakistani soil in relation to the Afghan situation. read more

    On Myanmar, Russia is actively coordinating with China to squash the US attempts to fuel instability in that country. Recently, Myanmar Foreign Minister U Wunna Maung Lwin visited China and met State Councilor and Foreign Minister Wang Yi on June 8.

    According to the Chinese readout, Wang said, “June 8 marks the 71st anniversary of the establishment of China-Myanmar diplomatic relations. Over the past 71 years, the people of China and Myanmar have stuck together and helped each other… China’s friendly policy toward Myanmar is not affected by changes to Myanmar’s domestic and external situation… China has supported, is supporting and will support Myanmar in choosing a development path that suits its own circumstances. China stands ready to work with Myanmar…”

    Beijing intends to do business with the military leadership in Myanmar. And Moscow is also planning the same. In fact, the Commander-in-chief of Myanmar’s armed forces Min Aung Hlaing just landed in Moscow on a 5-day visit.

    These crushing blows to the Biden administration’s prestige will resonate all across Asia-Pacific region. Russia and China are coordinating to derail the US’ grand project to create rings of instability in their adjacent regions — Ukraine, Belarus, Moldavia, Hong Kong, Myanmar, Afghanistan.

    Where does the US go from here? Clearly, it lacks the capacity to pursue a double containment strategy against Russia and China. Nor is there any aspiration on the part of the European powers to get entangled in such a strategy risking confrontation with Russia and China.

    Last week, on return from Geneva, Sullivan hinted at Plan B, saying Biden “will look for opportunities to engage with President Xi going forward…

    It’s now just a question of when and how.”

    https://www.indianpunchline.com/fizz...-putin-summit/
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  18. #118
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    One of the many links in post #117.

    Russian-US relations ‘not a one-way street,’ says Lavrov

    Vladimir Putin supported Joe Biden’s offer to resolve the existing issues on a mutually acceptable basis, Russian Foreign Minister recalled

    Putin-Biden meeting in Geneva

    18 Jun, 20:25

    "MOSCOW, June 18. /TASS/. Russia will not permit a "one-way street" approach in its relations with the US, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said during a press conference on Friday, commenting on Washington’s assessment of the meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Joe Biden in Geneva.

    "I’ve read the assessments of US officials, including the participants of the talks, on the outcomes of the Geneva talks. They are trying to position themselves in such a way that they said":

    "We need to return the personnel that will facilitate the work of the embassy, we need to get Russia to respond to the accusations related to the activity of hackers, who are attacking the American infrastructure, and we need to get Russia to release the Americans serving prison sentences."

    This is not the approach that the presidents talked about. I want those, who comment on the results of the summit in such a way, to hear this:

    "this will not be a one-way street," the minister said.

    Lavrov pointed out that Putin had supported Biden’s offer to resolve the existing issues on a mutually acceptable basis.

    "If the logic of the Americans is like this: we returned the ambassadors, and now you should do everything we want, and then we will see - about diplomats, cyber attacks, convicts - this is not acceptable. So, if the logic that the presidents expressed in Geneva prevails among the bureaucrats, I think we will get results."

    The Russian top diplomat concluded.

    The Russia-US summit, initiated by Washington, took place in the Swiss city of Geneva on Wednesday. Putin and Biden discussed the state and the prospects of the further development of bilateral relations, the issues of strategic security, as well as international matters, including cooperation in the fight against COVID-19 and regulation of regional conflicts.

    After the meeting in Geneva, Putin and Biden issued a joint statement on strategic stability.


    Russian-US relations ‘not a one-way street,’ says Lavrov - Russian Politics & Diplomacy - TASS

  19. #119
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    we need to get Russia to respond to the accusations related to the activity of hackers, who are attacking the American infrastructure
    Or as this Putin lackey says, "We don't".

    So don't expect any sympathy for what happens next.

  20. #120
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Putin/SU/Russia . . . do try to keep up, as difficult as it may be.


    I'll hep you along a little bit more as those with special needs require it:







    Notice anything, Backspit?
    Yeah ? I'm just trying to give it some context. You make it sound like Stalin is the only leader in history that has killed a bunch of his own people.

  21. #121
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    we need to get Russia to respond to the accusations related to the activity of hackers, who are attacking the American infrastructure
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Or as this Putin lackey says, "We don't".
    So don't expect any sympathy for what happens next.
    As harry is well known quoting always "unbiasedly":
    In post above #81 he surely has read about what the dangerous Mr. Putin said:

    As for cyber security, we have agreed to start consultations on this issue. I consider this very important.

    Now about the commitments each side must make. I would like to tell you about things that are generally known, but not to the public at large. American sources – I am simply afraid to mix up the names of organisations (Mr Peskov will give them to you later) – have said that most cyberattacks in the world come from US cyberspace. Canada is second. It is followed by two Latin American countries and then the United Kingdom. As you can see, Russia is not on the list of these countries from whose cyberspace the most cyberattacks originate. This is the first point.

    Now the second point. In 2020 we received 10 inquiries from the United States about cyberattacks on US facilities – as our colleagues say – from Russian cyberspace. Two more requests were made this year. Our colleagues received exhaustive responses to all of them, both in 2020 and this year.

    In turn, Russia sent 45 inquiries to the relevant US agency last year and 35 inquiries in the first half of this year. We have not yet received a single response. This shows that we have a lot to work on.

    The question of who, on what scale and in what area must make commitments should be resolved during negotiations. We have agreed to start such consultations. We believe that cyber security is extremely important in the world in general, for the United States in particular, and to the same extent for Russia.

    For example, we are aware of the cyberattacks on the pipeline company in the United States. We are also aware of the fact that the company had to pay 5 million to the cybercriminals. According to my information, a portion of the money has been returned from the e-wallets. What do Russia’s public authorities have to do with this?

    We face the same threats. For example, there was an attack on the public healthcare system of a large region in the Russian Federation. Of course, we see where the attacks are coming from, and we see that these activities are coordinated from US cyberspace. I do not think that the United States, official US authorities, are interested in this kind of manipulation. What we need to do is discard all the conspiracy theories, sit down at the expert level and start working in the interests of the United States and the Russian Federation. In principle, we have agreed to this, and Russia is willing to do so.
    Isn't it interesting - and commendable - that Mr. P. did not make any accusations which state or even a person is behind such attacks? Unlike others who knows immediately the minute who did it whenever something has happened...

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    Yeah ? I'm just trying to give it some context.
    No, you're not. No, really. You're not.



    Quote Originally Posted by Backspin View Post
    You make it sound like Stalin is the only leader in history that has killed a bunch of his own people.
    And here comes the man-child brain again. Go sit at the back of the class, Backspit. The adults will let you know when you can return

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