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  1. #1
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    China's 600 km/h high-speed maglev

    China's 600 km/h high-speed maglev completes successful trial run
    Updated 22:41, 22-Jun-2020
    China's 600 km/h high-speed maglev-maglev-jpg


    China is getting a step closer to bring more air travelers down to earth.

    A high-speed maglev test vehicle, with a speed of 600 km/h, successfully conducted its maiden test run on a maglev line at Tongji University in Shanghai on Sunday, marking a new important breakthrough in China's high-speed maglev development.

    The average air travel speed of jet passenger planes is 800km/h, while that of conventional bullet trains in China is around 300km/h. Researchers expect the 600 km/h maglev train to fill the gap between the two and help to establish a more reasonable, efficient and flexible transport network to meet the travel needs of different groups.

    What's the test about?

    Sunday's trial is the first dynamic operation of the prototype on the maglev test track, marking a major step forward from its static trials.

    The test run obtained a large amount of crucial data and proved the key performance of the high-speed maglev system, providing technical support for the development and optimization of the follow-up high-speed maglev project test vehicle.

    "During the multi-condition test, the vehicle showed stable suspension guidance and a sound operation state. All key technical indicators met the design requirements and expectations," said Ding Sansan, head of the research and development team and deputy chief engineer of CRRC Qingdao Sifang.

    When will it be put into commercial operation?

    By the end of 2020, a whole engineering system of the 600 km/h high-speed maglev prototype is expected to be rolled off the production line. That means China will master a whole package of the technology and engineering capability by that time.

    The next step is to industrializing the technology. China aims to put a 500-kilometer-long high-speed maglev line into commercial use by 2025.

    People in east China's Zhejiang are especially excited about the news, as the Shanghai-Hangzhou high-speed maglev train has been included in the planned ten super transport projects in the province in the next few years.

    Once completed, Hangzhou citizens will be able to reach Shanghai in 20 minutes.

    China's 600 km/h high-speed maglev completes successful trial run - CGTN

  2. #2
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    What is it about Asians and their bombastic, posturing need for self aggrandisement through puerile fantasy land boasts.

    Ir can't be just the small dick and every fucker looking the same phenomena, can it?

  3. #3
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    It just needs to steal a bit more technology first.

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    The Chinese have been running their Pudong maglev train for nearly 20 years. I have seen it but never used it. It hits 400 km/hr, the locals tell me. It has in effect been a long-term test track. The step up to 600 km/hr seems incremental.

    So far as I know, that Pudong line is the world's only functioning maglev railway. I am sure someone here will add to my knowledge if I am wrong.

    I have used the high-speed train from Shanghai to Hangzhou. There is a speedometer screen in each car and people on my trip were quite excited when it hit 300. A very comfortable journey.

    Some time after my visit to Hangzhou a famous arch fell down. I had previously walked under it. A couple of people died. I remember thinking back then of the contrast between the train which seems to work and a basic arch, which didn't.

  5. #5
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    Have to build a few more dams on the Mekong or burn a bit more coal to power that.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Cow View Post
    It just needs to steal a bit more technology first.
    Wondering where they steal it from?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plan B View Post
    Have to build a few more dams on the Mekong or burn a bit more coal to power that.
    The idea behind maglev is that because it has no wheels it is much more energy efficient than a conventional train. The wind resistance is still an issue and the hypothesis is that if it ran in a vacuum tunnel then it could hit 1,000 km/hr whilst using a fraction of the energy needed by a modern passenger jet. One train could carry many more people than a wide-bodied jet and take them city centre to city centre.
    There are a good many practical issues to consider, particularly technical development and construction costs. Just look at the HSR project in the UK. China however can ignore objections. I am not saying that is a good thing but it gives them more opportunity to develop these vast projects.

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    Pretty impressive, gets my vote. Saves all that time wasting at airports.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plan B View Post
    Have to build a few more dams on the Mekong or burn a bit more coal to power that.
    China's 600 km/h high-speed maglev-energy-jpg


    USA 79,056 kWh/y ..................................... CHINA 26,013 kWh/y

    (however 5 years ago) .................................... (however 6 years ago- before Laos damsss built)

  10. #10
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    They already have a maglev train that runs from the airport into Pudong.. it's a short rail though. I've been on it a few times, super friken fast.

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    ^^

    More whataboutism.

    You also have to factor in sources such as Hydro, Geo, Nuclear, Coal, Wind. The further North you go more energy is needed for heating.
    But yes, we get it. USA bad, China good. No one said the US wasn't particularly shit at energy management. Why you think it's relevant on a thread about China?
    Who knows?
    Dear Anti-vaxers: Enjoy your free trial.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    Saves all that time wasting at airports.
    And all that major deja vu one gets at airports

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shutree View Post
    So far as I know, that Pudong line is the world's only functioning maglev railway. I am sure someone here will add to my knowledge if I am wrong.
    Korea and Japan have them.

    And the world's first commercial line was in Birmingham, so the chinkies probably nicked that.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat reinvented's Avatar
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    Used the one from Canton to Changsha, that tipped 300, very nice bit of kit. the 6 hours on the bus to go a few 100Km afterwards not so much

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    Netflix - History 101 Episode 3: The rise of China.

    Explained in 30 minutes or so in idiot language.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plan B View Post
    ^^

    More whataboutism.

    You also have to factor in sources such as Hydro, Geo, Nuclear, Coal, Wind. The further North you go more energy is needed for heating.
    But yes, we get it. USA bad, China good. No one said the US wasn't particularly shit at energy management. Why you think it's relevant on a thread about China?
    Who knows?
    A whataboutism is when somebody writes:
    Originally Posted by Plan B (China's 600 km/h high-speed maglev)
    Have to build a few more dams on the Mekong or burn a bit more coal to power that.

    Of course, China needs to develop more and more their energy system when they have been able to do all those engineering accomplishments the world see within 30 years - nearly from zero. (Easy when they sometimes get a good adviser coming together with AF2 plane...)

    As of the electrical power production comparison: The annual per capita consumption in USA was always ca. 4 times higher than in the "advanced" EU countries (as e.g. Germany building some all-electric cities). Nowadays the difference is not so huge, perhaps with the Food Stamp the electric bills are not so easy to pay...

    However, as usually, we see here from some honorable members always a very unbiased views on actions of others...

    The USA cannot bring the power from Laos, so they better have built most of the power plants in Asia (and other poor countries too) - before getting a strong competition by others.

    And the mining of energies in the own country? Does the huge fracking make the population more happy than a power plant on the river? (just curious...)

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Korea and Japan have them.

    And the world's first commercial line was in Birmingham, so the chinkies probably nicked that.
    Fair enough. I didn't know they had them too.
    I have a vague recollection of the one at Birmingham airport although that was long ago and I never actually used it.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman123 View Post
    Saves all that time wasting at airports.
    that's what it's all about.

    We were talking to some Chinese friends last year and take it over flying as it saves all the checking-in, waiting, security blah blah of getting a plane. The time difference isn't too much when you take all that into account.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    The USA cannot bring the power from Laos, so they better have built most of the power plants in Asia (and other poor countries too)
    Please back this quote up with the facts. Thank you.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    Wondering where they steal it from?
    Siemens.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reinvented View Post
    Used the one from Canton to Changsha, that tipped 300, very nice bit of kit. the 6 hours on the bus to go a few 100Km afterwards not so much
    'Canton'

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edmond View Post
    that's what it's all about.

    We were talking to some Chinese friends last year and take it over flying as it saves all the checking-in, waiting, security blah blah of getting a plane. The time difference isn't too much when you take all that into account.
    Not to mention the trains usually end up in the city as opposed to way outside the city so there's the travel to and from the airport.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cujo View Post
    'Canton'
    Ah yes, shortly after travelling to Abyssinia, Ceylon and Gaul.


  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Please back this quote up with the facts. Thank you.
    Oh stop it.


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