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  1. #776
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Bit funny really. The biggest lobbyist to get Tik Tok banned in the US has been Mark Zuckerberg. Now it looks like Facebook have swapped a little known Chinese company for Microsoft, as a competitor. Out of the frying pan...
    Zuckerberg would be ecstatic for Microsoft to acquire TikTok. They are well known for making a complete fucking mess of consumer products.

    Skype, MSN, Windows Mobile, Terraserver, etc.

  2. #777
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    This is news to me, has anyone else heard of it before?

    Announcing the Expansion of the Clean Network to Safeguard America’s Assets


    Press Statement

    Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

    August 5, 2020

    "The Clean Network program is the Trump Administration’s comprehensive approach to guarding our citizens’ privacy and our companies’ most sensitive information from aggressive intrusions by malign actors, such as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). Today, I am announcing the launch of five new lines of effort to protect America’s critical telecommunications and technology infrastructure.

    These programs are rooted in internationally accepted digital trust standards and built upon the 5G Clean Path initiative, announced on April 29, 2020, to secure data traveling on 5G networks into U.S. diplomatic facilities overseas and within the United States.

    The five new lines of effort for the Clean Network are as follows:


    • Clean Carrier: To ensure untrusted People’s Republic of China (PRC) carriers are not connected with U.S. telecommunications networks. Such companies pose a danger to U.S. national security and should not provide international telecommunications services to and from the United States.




    • Clean Store: To remove untrusted applications from U.S. mobile app stores. PRC apps threaten our privacy, proliferate viruses, and spread propaganda and disinformation. American’s most sensitive personal and business information must be protected on their mobile phones from exploitation and theft for the CCP’s benefit.




    • Clean Apps: To prevent untrusted PRC smartphone manufacturers from pre-installing –or otherwise making available for download – trusted apps on their apps store. Huawei, an arm of the PRC surveillance state, is trading on the innovations and reputations of leading U.S. and foreign companies. These companies should remove their apps from Huawei’s app store to ensure they are not partnering with a human rights abuser.




    • Clean Cloud: To prevent U.S. citizens’ most sensitive personal information and our businesses’ most valuable intellectual property, including COVID-19 vaccine research, from being stored and processed on cloud-based systems accessible to our foreign adversaries through companies such as Alibaba, Baidu, and Tencent.




    • Clean Cable: To ensure the undersea cables connecting our country to the global internet are not subverted for intelligence gathering by the PRC at hyper scale. We will also work with foreign partners to ensure that undersea cables around the world aren’t similarly subject to compromise.


    Momentum for the Clean Network program is growing. More than thirty countries and territories are now Clean Countries, and many of the world’s biggest telecommunications companies are Clean Telcos. All have committed to exclusively using trusted vendors in their Clean Networks.

    The United States calls on our allies and partners in government and industry around the world to join the growing tide to secure our data from the CCP’s surveillance state and other malign entities. Building a Clean fortress around our citizens’ data will ensure all of our nations’ security."

    Announcing the Expansion of the Clean Network to Safeguard America’s Assets - United States Department of State

    The regime states one of it's targets, "such as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP)", although not exclusively the only one.

    The regime states that there is, in existence an, "internationally accepted digital trust standard".

    Which international organisation was formed to create, required to monitor and certify the "standards"?


    I can understand the ameristani regime working to protect it's, "U.S. diplomatic facilities overseas and within the United States.".

    To prevent untrusted People’s Republic of China (PRC) carriers are not connected with U.S. telecommunications networks.

    Who has defined some as "untrusted"?

    Are their any "trusted" PRC carriers?

    How will the regime ensure who are be , "not connected with U.S. telecommunications networks.

    Cut all it's undersea cables, destroy all it's telecom capable satellites/jam the airwaves?

    Are ameristani citizens blocked from selecting apps they want and not "
    untrusted applications" available from non, "U.S. mobile app stores".

    A
    s defined by who?

    Who has defined what is most, "sensitive" and must "be protected" information on their mobile phones from "exploitation and theft for the CCP’s benefit".

    Suggesting it's acceptable, if the other 194 world's countries do it.?

    Who has defined which are the, "untrusted PRC smartphone manufacturers" and which countries "company's apps store" are deemed to be, "trustworthy"?

    Who will determine which hosting companies which have data "stored and processed on cloud-based systems accessible to our foreign adversaries through companies", are to be closed down?

    Who will determine who are allowed, "intelligence gathering", from the "undersea cables around the world" ?

    "More than thirty countries and territories are now Clean Countries, and many of the world’s biggest telecommunications companies are Clean Telcos."

    No countries or companies have raised their heads, as far as I know, above the parapet in public support of the regime's
    existing or the expansion of, the the regime's "Clean Network", yet.

    Let the lists be made public.

    Last edited by OhOh; 08-08-2020 at 11:20 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  3. #778
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    Qualcomm lobbies U.S. to sell chips for Huawei 5G phones: WSJ

    "Chipmaker Qualcomm Inc is lobbying the U.S. government to revoke restrictions on sale of components to Huawei Technologies Co [HWT.UL], after the Chinese company was blacklisted by the United States, The Wall Street Journal reported on Saturday.

    Qualcomm is lobbying to sell chips to Huawei that the Chinese company would include in its 5G phones, according to the report, citing a presentation by Qualcomm.

    With these restrictions, the U.S. has handed Qualcomm’s foreign competitors a market worth as much as $8 billion annually, the report said.

    Qualcomm did not immediately reply to a Reuters request for comment.

    The company resolved a licensing dispute with Huawei last month, which will pay Qualcomm a catch-up payment of $1.8 billion in the fiscal fourth quarter."


    Qualcomm lobbies U.S. to sell chips for Huawei 5G phones: WSJ - Reuters

  4. #779
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    This is news to me, has anyone else heard of it before?
    No but it's fucking great. First sensible thing the bald orange turd has done.

  5. #780
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    The company resolved a licensing dispute with Huawei last month, which will pay Qualcomm a catch-up payment of $1.8 billion in the fiscal fourth quarter."
    . . . because Huawei tried to hide behind the Communist government for support . . . licensing and IP adherence were never important to the thieving pricks in China

  6. #781
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    because Huawei tried to hide behind the Communist government for support
    Why they are not like the big ones on other side of the world, independent from the state and the correct party? (once that and once the other)

  7. #782
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    Why they
    Why don't you just try to sty on topic for a change. You support IP theft and licensing fraud? Simple, really. You do or you don't - and don't go off on tangents.

  8. #783
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    You support IP theft and licensing fraud?
    There is no indication of that.

    However you post constantly about one company's actions and yet other's you fail to mention. Balanced posting, no.

    Your constant attacks on one country, along with far more TD posters of a similar ilk, is obvious to all.

    Does Klondyk, myself and the handful of others, scare you so much? Do they winge about the numerous posters. get a backbone.

    One example.

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    licensing and IP adherence were never important to the thieving pricks in China
    You may wish to investigate the numerous court cases and settlements of similar IP cases around the world, prior to zeroing in to one country's companies. It is not an uncommon situation.

    If it was only one countries/government supported companies I would be supporting your position, but alas some know it never has been and is not now.

  9. #784
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Can I take this one?
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    A: Because he's a fucking idiot?
    Well done . . . an easy one to answer, but well done

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    However you post constantly about one company's actions
    Can you read the thread title? It even has the company's name in it

    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    You may wish to investigate the numerous court cases and settlements of similar IP cases around the world
    So, start a thread on one of these "numerous court cases and settlements of similar IP cases around the world" because you're clearly too fucking stupid to stick to one thread. If you don't like the comments on this thread because it hurts your Chinese sensibilities then start other threads about other countries' and companies' misdeeds.

    Seriously, OhOh, get a grip and. You and Klondyke constantly go on about the evil west and staunchly defend your birthplaces - good or you, but don't complain when others do the same, which they don't. Accept that you two were born into societies that are nasty and dangerous, anti-freedom and bullying social malcontents.

  10. #785
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    There is no indication of that.
    There is every indication of it, you are in complete denial at how the thieving chinkies take every opportunity to steal other people's IP.

    Or perhaps you just lie about it, which is more probable.

  11. #786
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    tried to hide behind the Communist government for support
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    at how the thieving chinkies take every opportunity to steal other people's IP.
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Why don't you just try to sty on topic for a change
    This thread is about one Chinese private company.

  12. #787
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    This thread is about one Chinese private company.

    More like "This thread is about one de facto chinky spying agency".


  13. #788
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    This thread is about one Chinese private company.
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    other's you fail to mention
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Your constant attacks on one country,
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    similar IP cases around the world
    What an absolute cretin you are

  14. #789
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    What an absolute cretin you are
    You only just noticed?


  15. #790
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    You only just noticed?
    Always knew, but the depth is astounding

  16. #791
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    Pity of some who are not said how stupid they are.

    However, after they read comments of others to their stupid, demagogic, ignorant (you name it) posts they feel stupid, demagogic, ignorant , absolutely cretin either...

  17. #792
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    However, after they read comments of others to their stupid, demagogic, ignorant (you name it) posts they feel stupid, demagogic, ignorant , absolutely cretin either...
    Don't feel bad, you'll soon confirm your beliefs of being "stupid, demagogic, ignorant , absolutely cretin"

  18. #793
    Thailand Expat Latindancer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    This thread is about one Chinese private company.
    Perhaps.

    Their behaviour is an example of what the entire government has been doing.

    Recently in the news here in Australia, our government verified that there have been many computer attacks from China, intended to steal information. As there have been for quite a few years.

  19. #794
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    In other news . . .

    Chinese tech giant Huawei is running out of processor chips to make smartphones due to U.S. sanctions and will be forced to stop production of its own most advanced chips, a company executive says, in a sign of growing damage to Huawei’s business from American pressure.
    LAT from today . . . and not a single shit was given about Huawei outside of China

  20. #795
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    In other news . . .



    LAT from today . . . and not a single shit was given about Huawei outside of China
    The should be grateful, those Qualcomm chips have so many fucking backdoors it's unbelievable.


  21. #796
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    Well come on, you gotta allow the CIA & NSA their back doors for National Security purposes.... it's a Patriot Act.

  22. #797
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    Huawei data centre built to spy on PNG

    Huawei data centre built to spy on PNG

    Angus GriggNational affairs correspondent

    Aug 11, 2020 – 12.00am
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    Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei built a data centre in Papua New Guinea, which exposed secret government files to being stolen, according to a report that catalogues Beijing's efforts to spy on the Pacific nation.
    The report, provided to the Australian government, noted outdated encryption software was deployed by Huawei, while firewall settings were insufficient for a centre designed to store the entire data archive of the PNG government.
    "It is assessed with high confidence that data flows could be easily intercepted," said the 2019 report on PNG's National Data Centre.
    "Remote access would not be detected by security settings."

    The Huawei data centre began operating before the APEC leaders meeting in PNG. Mark Schiefelbein
    The assessment will heap further pressure on Huawei as it fights to remain as part of the 5G networks in Germany, following bans in Britain, France, the US and Australia.
    The US and its allies, including Australia, have become increasingly wary of China seeking to extend its influence among developing nations in the Pacific by extending cheap loans for major projects.
    The report on Huawei is the first to document its complicity in Beijing's cyber espionage activities, after more than a decade of rumours and pointed remarks from security agencies.
    The Port Moresby data centre was funded through a $US53 million development loan from China's Exim Bank and became operational in 2018, before PNG hosted that year's APEC leaders meeting.
    Litany of flaws

    The report noted the layout of the data centre did not match the intended design, opening up major security gaps.
    "Core switches are not behind firewalls. This means remote access would not be detected by security settings within the appliances," it said.

    In a statement, Huawei said: “This project complies with appropriate industry standards and the requirements of the customer.”
    The report was commissioned by the National Cyber Security Centre of PNG, which is funded by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.
    It was written by a cyber security contractor hired by DFAT and the report was then handed to the Australian government.
    DFAT declined to comment.
    In cataloguing major security flaws, the report, which ran to 65 pages in its original form, said the algorithm used for encrypting communications was considered "openly broken" by cyber security experts two years before being installed in Port Moresby.
    The Huawei firewalls in the data centre reached their "end of life" in 2016, two years before the facility was opened.
    While the report suggests a deliberate effort by Huawei to deploy lax cyber security, it noted this plan was partially thwarted by the centre quickly falling into disrepair, as insufficient money was set aside for maintenance and operations.

  23. #798
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    That's what they do.

  24. #799
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Scum of the earth

  25. #800
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    Spy agency ducks questions about 'back doors' in tech products


    "The U.S. National Security Agency is rebuffing efforts by a leading Congressional critic to determine whether it is continuing to place so-called back doors into commercial technology products, in a controversial practice that critics say damages both U.S. industry and national security.
    The NSA has long sought agreements with technology companies under which they would build special access for the spy agency into their products, according to disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and reporting by Reuters and others.

    These so-called back doors enable the NSA and other agencies to scan large amounts of traffic without a warrant. Agency advocates say the practice has eased collection of vital intelligence in other countries, including interception of terrorist communications.

    The agency developed new rules for such practices after the Snowden leaks in order to reduce the chances of exposure and compromise, three former intelligence officials told Reuters. But aides to Senator Ron Wyden, a leading Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, say the NSA has stonewalled on providing even the gist of the new guidelines.

    “Secret encryption back doors are a threat to national security and the safety of our families – it’s only a matter of time before foreign hackers or criminals exploit them in ways that undermine American national security,” Wyden told Reuters. “The government shouldn’t have any role in planting secret back doors in encryption technology used by Americans.”

    The agency declined to say how it had updated its policies on obtaining special access to commercial products. NSA officials said the agency has been rebuilding trust with the private sector through such measures as offering warnings about software flaws.

    “At NSA, it’s common practice to constantly assess processes to identify and determine best practices,” said Anne Neuberger, who heads NSA’s year-old Cybersecurity Directorate. “We don’t share specific processes and procedures.”

    Three former senior intelligence agency figures told Reuters that the NSA now requires that before a back door is sought, the agency must weigh the potential fallout and arrange for some kind of warning if the back door gets discovered and manipulated by adversaries.

    The continuing quest for hidden access comes as governments in the United States, the United Kingdom and elsewhere seek laws that would require tech companies to let governments see unencrypted traffic. Defenders of strong encryption say the NSA’s sometimes-botched efforts to install back doors in commercial products show the dangers of such requirements.

    Critics of the NSA’s practices say they create targets for adversaries, undermine trust in U.S. technology and compromise efforts to persuade allies to reject Chinese technology that could be used for espionage, since U.S. gear can also be turned to such purposes.

    In at least one instance, a foreign adversary was able to take advantage of a back door invented by U.S. intelligence, according to Juniper Networks Inc, which said in 2015 its equipment had been compromised. In a previously unreported statement to members of Congress in July seen by Reuters, Juniper said an unnamed national government had converted the mechanism first created by the NSA. The NSA told Wyden staffers in 2018 that there was a “lessons learned” report about the Juniper incident and others, according to Wyden spokesman Keith Chu.

    “NSA now asserts that it cannot locate this document,” Chu told Reuters. NSA and Juniper declined to comment on the matter.

    JUNIPER’S COMPROMISE

    The NSA has pursued many means for getting inside equipment, sometimes striking commercial deals to induce companies to insert back doors, and in other cases manipulating standards - namely by setting processes so that companies unknowingly adopt software that NSA experts can break, according to reports from Reuters and other media outlets.

    The tactics drew widespread attention starting in 2013, when Snowden leaked documents referencing these practices.
    Tech companies that were later exposed for having cut deals that allowed backdoor access, including security pioneer RSA, lost credibility and customers. Other U.S. firms lost business overseas as customers grew wary of the NSA’s reach.
    All of that prompted a White House policy review.

    “There were all sorts of ‘lessons learned’ processes,” said former White House cybersecurity coordinator Michael Daniel, who was advising then-president Barack Obama when the Snowden files erupted. A special commission appointed by Obama said the government should never “subvert” or “weaken” tech products or compromise standards.

    The White House did not publicly embrace that recommendation, instead beefing up review procedures for whether to use newly discovered software flaws for offensive cyber operations or get them fixed to improve defense, Daniel and others said.
    The secret government contracts for special access remained outside of the formal review.

    “The NSA had contracts with companies across the board to help them out, but that’s extremely protected,” said an intelligence community lawyer.

    The starkest example of the risks inherent in the NSA’s approach involved an encryption-system component known as Dual Elliptic Curve, or Dual EC. The intelligence agency worked with the Commerce Department to get the technology accepted as a global standard, but cryptographers later showed that the NSA could exploit Dual EC to access encrypted data.

    RSA accepted a $10 million contract to incorporate Dual EC into a widely used web security system, Reuters reported in 2013. RSA said publicly that it would not have knowingly installed a back door, but its reputation was tarnished and the company was sold.

    Juniper Networks got into hot water over Dual EC two years later. At the end of 2015, the maker of internet switches disclosed that it had detected malicious code in some firewall products. Researchers later determined that hackers had turned the firewalls into their own spy tool by altering Juniper’s version of Dual EC.

    Juniper said little about the incident. But the company acknowledged to security researcher Andy Isaacson in 2016 that it had installed Dual EC as part of a “customer requirement,” according to a previously undisclosed contemporaneous message seen by Reuters. Isaacson and other researchers believe that customer was a U.S. government agency, since only the U.S. is known to have insisted on Dual EC elsewhere.

    Juniper has never identified the customer, and declined to comment for this story.

    Likewise, the company never identified the hackers. But two people familiar with the case told Reuters that investigators concluded the Chinese government was behind it. They declined to detail the evidence they used.

    The Chinese government has long denied involvement in hacking of any kind. In a statement to Reuters, the Chinese foreign ministry said that cyberspace is “highly virtual and difficult to trace. It is extremely irresponsible to make accusations of hacker attacks without complete and conclusive evidence. At the same time, we also noticed that the report mentioned that it was the U.S. intelligence agency - the National Security Agency - that created this backdoor technology.”

    NERVOUS COMPANIES


    Wyden remains determined to find out exactly what happened at Juniper and what has changed since as the encryption wars heat up.

    This July, in previously unreported responses to questions from Wyden and allies in Congress, Juniper said that an unidentified nation was believed to be behind the hack into its firewall code but that it had never investigated why it installed Dual EC in the first place.

    “We understand that there is a vigorous policy debate about whether and how to provide government access to encrypted content,” it said in a July letter. “Juniper does not and will not insert back doors into its products and we oppose any legislation mandating back doors.”

    A former senior NSA official told Reuters that many tech companies remain nervous about working covertly with the government. But the agencies’ efforts continue, the person said, because special access is seen as too valuable to give up.

    Spy agency ducks questions about '''back doors''' in tech products | Reuters

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