Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,363

    Fly Chinese: Everywhere!

    ...with YD's recent China Eastern adventure in mind:

    Why your next flight may go via China

    By Pamela Parker BBC News, Singapore




    Chinese airlines have greatly increased their number of international flightsBooking a flight from London to Sydney can paint a telling picture of the big change in global air travel in recent years.

    It is the same if you are looking to fly from Bangkok to Los Angeles. Or from Singapore to New York.
    In all three cases, the cheapest tickets these days are often offered by a Chinese airline.
    Take the London to Sydney route. Using one of the best-known flight-finder websites to search for a ticket to fly out and back on two dates picked at random - 30 October and 12 November - the cheapest available, at the time of writing, was quoted by China Southern Airlines.
    Meanwhile, if you wanted to fly between Bangkok and Los Angeles on the same dates, the lowest-priced ticket was offered by China Eastern Airlines.
    So if you don't mind having a stopover in a Chinese city you might not have heard of before - how about 12 hours in Qingdao? - leisure and business travellers can often save a fair amount of money.



    China has seen a huge growth in air passenger numbersBut how exactly are a growing number of Chinese airlines able to offer bargain prices that undercut more established rivals from Europe, the US, Asia, and the Middle East? Are they playing fair?
    And how are the Chinese carriers able to secure an increasing amount of often hard-to-get landing slots around the world?
    China's main airlines are undoubtedly being subsidised by the Chinese government, says Shukor Yusof, founder of Endau Analytics, a Singapore-based aviation industry research group.
    These subsidies enable the carriers, such as the big three - Air China, China Eastern and China Southern - to aggressively gain market share around the world without worrying too much about any losses along the way.

    "Chinese carriers do not reveal details, or specifics," says Mr Yusof. "However, taking account of the numbers that are flying, it would be fair to say that some are breaking even, many lose money, and few are able to eke out profits."



    Analysts say the big Chinese airlines have worked hard to match the cabin qualities of the established carriers of the WestChina's airlines are also benefiting from regional Chinese governments offering them subsidies to run international flights from their main cities, in the hope of putting them more on the map, and encouraging tourism and economic development.
    In 2016 regional Chinese authorities outside Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou spent at least 8.6bn yuan ($1.3bn; 1bn) subsidising airlines, mostly towards international flights, according to data compiled by research group Civil Aviation Data Analysis.

    One of the smaller Chinese carriers, Sichuan Airlines, offers services to Los Angeles from Hangzhou and Jinan, and both flights are said to rely heavily on subsidies, with less than 60% of seats full, compared with the global, industry-wide average of 81.4% in 2017.



    China has built 55 new airports since 2010Thanks to the financial support from the Chinese government - which is the majority owner of Air China, China Eastern and China Southern - the Chinese carriers also have the funds to buy landing slots around the world. These can cost tens of millions of dollars, with airlines having to buy them from other carriers.
    Yet while the Chinese government is undoubtedly using its financial muscle to help Chinese airlines grab a growing share of the global aviation market, it would be far too simplistic to attribute the rising dominance of the country's carriers to state sponsorship alone.

    Instead you have to remember that China is the world's most populous country, and a growing number of its people can afford to fly overseas on holiday. This comes at the same time as countries in the West have eased visa restrictions on Chinese travellers.

    Mr Yusof says that the number of people from mainland China flying abroad has more than doubled over the past decade, "the fastest [rate] in the world".
    "We are talking close to 100 million seats in 2017 alone," he says.



    Outside of Asia, the most popular overseas destination for Chinese holidaymakers is the US. These Chinese tourists spend on average almost $7,000 (5,500) per trip, according to the US Travel Association.

    Given the boost this gives to the tourism industry in the US and Europe, you can see why governments are quite happy to see more flights from China.
    In fact, the growth in international Chinese passenger numbers is so extensive that China is forecast to overtake the US as the world's largest aviation market by 2022, according to the International Air Transport Association industry body.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  2. #2
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    สุโขทัย
    Posts
    8,440
    The tide was turning years ago.
    Some are just catching on.

  3. #3
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    20,328


    foj

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
    happynz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:43 PM
    Location
    on the corner of dusty and dustier
    Posts
    9,901
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...with YD's recent China Eastern adventure in mind:
    For your spouse's sake I hope they've improved since I flew with 'em several years ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    Analysts say the big Chinese airlines have worked hard to match the cabin qualities of the established carriers of the West.
    Not exactly a high bar when comparing economy class on the large US and European airlines.

  5. #5
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    20,328
    'YD' is YourDaddy.

    He recently took the skinflint express from BKK to Canada via China.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
    Mandaloopy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 07:47 PM
    Location
    ᠮᠣᠩᠭᠣᠯ ᠤᠯᠤᠰ
    Posts
    2,521
    Flew with Shandong airlines from BKK to Qingdao, overall a good experience. Economy was rammed but everyone mostly slept as it left at 3 AM or something, so not a massive issue. On time departure and arrival- breakfast was almost passable- some sort of port burger- nibbled at it a bit. Seats were surprisingly comfortable and the service while not that well polished was well intended and polite.

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat
    happynz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:43 PM
    Location
    on the corner of dusty and dustier
    Posts
    9,901
    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    'YD' is YourDaddy.

    He recently took the skinflint express from BKK to Canada via China.
    Oh. You're right. D'oh.

  8. #8
    Not a Mod.
    Begbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Lagrangian Point
    Posts
    11,367
    FTFY

    Fly: Chinese Everywhere

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat
    OhOh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 11:25 PM
    Location
    Where troubles melt like lemon drops
    Posts
    20,282
    BKK - LAX return THB 16,965 Economy 2hour stopover in Xiamen Gaoqi International Airport.

    Helpful Bangkok office, Boeing planes - 737 and 789, clunky English website here:

    https://www.xiamenair.com/en-th/

  10. #10
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:23 PM
    Location
    Roiet
    Posts
    31,016
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    BKK - LAX return THB 16,965 Economy
    As compared to EVA. THB 25,725

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •