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  1. #1
    I don't know barbaro's Avatar
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    Culture Shock: phases. Your Experience

    Many of us here on TD have been in LOS for some time, and/or other nations & cultures.

    But Culture Shock is a real pheonomenon. We've all been through some instance of it, to some degree.

    More articles to follow.

    So....what instances of culture have you had?

    How are you different today, than when you were when you first arrived in regards to culture and culture shock?

    Look at the phases below.

    Culture shock

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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    This article is about the term's general meaning. For its use as a proper noun, see Culture Shock.
    Culture shock refers to the anxiety and feelings (of surprise, disorientation, uncertainty, confusion, etc.) felt when people have to operate within a different and unknown cultural or social environment, such as a foreign country. It grows out of the difficulties in assimilating the new culture, causing difficulty in knowing what is appropriate and what is not. This is often combined a dislike for or even disgust (moral or aesthetical) with certain aspects of the new or different culture. The term was introduced for the first time in 1954 by Kalervo Oberg.[citation needed]
    Contents


    [edit] Phases of culture shock

    Enthusiastic welcome offered to the first Indian student to arrive to Dresden, Germany (1951)



    The shock (of moving to a foreign country) often consists of distinct phases, though not everyone passes through these phases and not everyone is in the new culture long enough to pass through all three[1]:
    • Honeymoon Phase - During this period the differences between the old and new culture are seen in a romantic light, wonderful and new. For example, in moving to a new country, an individual might love the new foods, the pace of the life, the people's habits, the buildings and so on.
    • Negotiation Phase - After some time (usually weeks), differences between the old and new culture become apparent and may create anxiety. One may long for food the way it is prepared in one's native country, may find the pace of life too fast or slow, may find the people's habits annoying, disgusting, and irritating etc. This phase is often marked by mood swings caused by minor issues or without apparent reason. Depression is not uncommon.
    • Adjustment Phase - Again, after some time (usually 6 - 12 months), one grows accustomed to the new culture and develops routines. One knows what to expect in most situations and the host country no longer feels all that new. One becomes concerned with basic living again, and things become more "normal".
    • Reverse Culture Shock (a.k.a. Re-entry Shock) - Returning to one's home culture after growing accustomed to a new one can produce the same effects as described above, which an affected person often finds more surprising and difficult to deal with as the original culture shock.
    There are three basic outcomes of the Adjustment Phase:
    • Some people find it impossible to accept the foreign culture and integrate. They isolate themselves from the host country's environment, which they come to perceive as hostile, withdraw into a ghetto and see return to their own culture as the only way out. These Rejectors also have the greatest problems re-integrating back home after return. Approx. 60% of expatriates behave in this way.
    • Some people integrate fully and take on all parts of the host culture while losing their original identity. They normally remain in the host country forever. Approx. 10% of expatriates belong to this group of Adopters.
    • Some people manage to adapt the aspects of the host culture they see as positive, while keeping some of their own and creating their unique blend. They have no major problems returning home or relocating elsewhere. Approx. 30% of expatriates are these so-called Cosmopolitans.
    Link. Culture shock - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    I'll add more later.

    Questions: how did each of these phases affect you?
    ............

  2. #2
    The Dentist English Noodles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Milkman
    Some people manage to adapt the aspects of the host culture they see as positive, while keeping some of their own and creating their unique blend. They have no major problems returning home or relocating elsewhere. Approx. 30% of expatriates are these so-called Cosmopolitans.
    That will be me then.

  3. #3
    On a walkabout
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    I could go back and live in Oz tomorrow but be just as happy to spend the rest of my life here.

    Then again I'm not footloose and fancy free like a few other members here and my life is largely governed by my families needs at any given time.

    Regarding the phases mentioned above I still feel like I'm on holiday here!
    Last edited by Loy Toy; 07-03-2009 at 12:34 AM.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat Boon Mee's Avatar
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    Exit signs in Old Blighty: Way Out

  5. #5
    Have you got any cheese Thetyim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by English Noodles
    Approx. 30% of expatriates are these so-called Cosmopolitans.
    I would have to go for that one

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat
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    I've lived away from my home country most of my adult life in an Expat capacity and in each circumstance, regardless of what others have said about me "going native", would place myself in the Adjustment Phase with the category of being able to manage to adapt the aspects of the host culture they see as positive, while keeping some of their own and creating their unique blend. They have no major problems returning home or relocating elsewhere. I would say thought that with each trip back to the homeland that I experienced more of and a longer recovery time dealing with the Reverse Cultural Shock. Not all that long mind you but longer with each trip.

    In fact, I would say that I almost feel more comfortable being away from my homeland than I do in it. I will add though, that it is a great feeling knowing that I have a home country to return to if things ever go South in the country I am residing in. There's no place like home.... there's no place like home....
    "Don't Sweat the Small Stuff....and it is all small stuff"

  7. #7
    ทำไมคุณแปลนี้
    filch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by English Noodles View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Milkman
    Some people manage to adapt the aspects of the host culture they see as positive, while keeping some of their own and creating their unique blend. They have no major problems returning home or relocating elsewhere. Approx. 30% of expatriates are these so-called Cosmopolitans.
    That will be me then.
    I'm with that.

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