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  1. #876
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    Women in 1920

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  2. #877
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    The days when trams ruled Bangkok (early 60s)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a07-jpg

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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-a04-jpg

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  3. #878
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    Nong, I have had this old photo of the trams for years. I have never been able to figure out where in Bangkok it is as it seems so rural, any idea?

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dkbks-jpg-1fd263856f7fb700155eed0771bc747f-jpg

  4. #879
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    ^ line 3..
    This link may give you an idea of where it could be

    Trams in Bangkok - Wikipedia

  5. #880
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Nong, I have had this old photo of the trams for years. I have never been able to figure out where in Bangkok it is as it seems so rural, any idea?

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dkbks-jpg-1fd263856f7fb700155eed0771bc747f-jpg
    I believe this image pre-dates 1900.....[mid/late 1890s??] when the no. 3 line routed itself extensively from The Grand Palace to Klong Toei - before modifying to the Dusit Line, which principally served the immediate Rattanakosin area. That area was still quite wooded well into the turn of last century. I'm guessing the road aside the tracks is a more southerly section of Maha Rat Rd or Sanam Chai Rd.

  6. #881
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Nong, I have had this old photo of the trams for years. I have never been able to figure out where in Bangkok it is as it seems so rural, any idea?

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-dkbks-jpg-1fd263856f7fb700155eed0771bc747f-jpg
    K. Iom and K. Huanglao have provided more information but once I checked with Thai research, they are different.

    I will send this photo to some historians.

    Will be back...

  7. #882
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    Trams did not just run in Bangkok.

    The first 'tang changwat' that had tram system operated was Lopburi. It started in 1955.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-004-jpg

  8. #883
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post


    I will send this photo to some historians.

    Will be back...

    I’m back (with no good luck)…

    Our historians have no idea at all because there was no even one significant something that could start from.

    They said that line #3 started from (roughly) ‘a place near Sapan Put (Memorial Bridge) – around the old city wall – Bang Lumpoo – Pra Athit Road – Rachini Road – along Na Pra-Tad Road – Ta Pra Chan Road – Ta Tien – Paklong Talad – over klong ‘Ong Ang’ – heading to Nang Leuang – Worachak - before ending at Thae Wet area’

    “So, it could be anywhere along this route” They said.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-004-jpg
    [A photo shot by W.J. Higgins on 1st March 1959 showing (a modern) Line #9 stopping at Wat Benjama Bopit (Note: Tram-stop looks like a red flag with one star within)]


    All my life, I used to ride on a tram just once (that I can remember), in Wongwien Yai area the place where I grew up. I remember that it ran very quietly with only metal sound of 'kang... kang..." along the way.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 07-06-2021 at 02:32 PM.

  9. #884
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    When the tram system was firstly introduced in Siam, in late 1800s, it should have been publicly popular because at the time, other kinds of vehicles had not been born yet. But due to lack of information provided (see related stories on page 13/309-310), not many passengers risked their fears to use it. Therefore, the business barely broke even.

    Before World War I, there were more people in the city also more marketing and demonstrations, tram business had gradually improved.

    Anyway, at the same time, more public vehicles such as tricycles, taxis and buses emerged. These vehicles got their shares of taking away the tram passengers.

    But the main disadvantage of trams was that they were quite slow especially when came the time to wait for the other tram that shared the same track to pass. So, it was not suitable for going around if you were in a hurry.

    During World War II, the lack of fuel to run the engines affected those public vehicles to stop running.
    The most popular public vehicles around that time were those that did not rely on fuel such as tricycles, rickshaws, and horse-drawn carriages but soon they also had to stop servicing because of short of rubber supply, for tires.

    Until then, people came back to use trams. Though a bit slow but they were more reliable.

    Sadly, fate of trams once again became worse at the end of World War II due to insufficient electricity. Many tram lines had to stop running. Some lines were reduced in circulation.

    The situation not only affected tram operation but people too. Each tram available became crowded and that made it difficult for passengers to get off. Some even had to get out through the windows.

    Also, crammed trams were dangerous. Accidents happened all the time to those passengers who had to hang themselves outside the trams. They might fall off or injure their body parts such as arms, legs or even necks.

    Worse such circumstance created a new career, pick-pocketing career that flourished during the War and after.

    And that was the history of trams in the past in Siam/Thailand, the first country in the world that brought electricity to provide a driving force.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1948-jpg
    (Accident in 1948 in front of Ratanakosin Hotel, Ratchadumnuen Road)


    Last edited by nathanielnong; 07-06-2021 at 03:03 PM.

  10. #885
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    But due to lack of information provided (see related stories on page 13/309-310), not many passengers risked their fears to use it. Therefore, the business barely broke even.
    I think that there is another reason in Thailand, similarly when the Mass Transport started: people who can afford to pay for the ticket are not really willing to walk their soi up to the main road and being seen so by the neighbours, moreover being sardined in the tram with the crowd.

    In the era of the trams they had had their samloor who came and picked them up, in case they did have their own car with a driver, not minding to sit under a/c car for few hours daily.

  11. #886
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    In the era of the trams they had had their samloor who came and picked them up, in case they did have their own car with a driver, not minding to sit under a/c car for few hours daily.
    I really cant understand what you are saying here. Can you try again? What are you saying about air conditioning in cars?

  12. #887
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    Perhaps they had had a/c in the tram or in the samloor... Anyway, don't worry that you do not understand, not so important (as other issues...)

  13. #888
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    Perhaps they had had a/c in the tram or in the samloor... Anyway, don't worry that you do not understand, not so important (as other issues...)
    Yes it is as when I first came here in 77 I experienced no air conditioning in taxi's or local buses. You got something like this that I took back to the SF bay area as its not really hot often there.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-electric-fan-inside-taxi-wpjmgd-jpg

  14. #889
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Yes it is as when I first came here in 77 I experienced no air conditioning in taxi's or local buses. You got something like this that I took back to the SF bay area as its not really hot often there.

    2 popular brands of taxis in those times...

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-004-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 08-06-2021 at 10:06 AM.

  15. #890
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    Pra Preechakolakan (noble title + name granted by the king; 1841-1879) whose birth name was Sum-Ang was the second child of a noble family from ‘Amattayakul’ lineage (see Note: 1 below). His father presented him as a royal chamberlain in the reign of King Rama IV (1858-1862).

    He was graduated in engineering field from Scotland, England at the age of only 20. The King was pleased and ordered him to help his father at the Ministry of Royal Mint.

    Graduated from overseas, Sum-Ang was a modern-minded person who loved inventing and researching. Like his father, the young man also liked to associate with foreigners, the activity that pleased and helped the King.

    Later on, when King Rama V took the throne in 1868, his favor for Sum-Ang still continued. The King appointed him to act as the head of the Ministry of Royal Mint instead of his father.

    As an engineer, young Sum-Ang invented a lot of new things. Among them was gas-fired facades for royal celebrations.

    In 1871, he was graciously appointed as Superintendent Engineer - Chief Mechanic controlling the Royal Ship named ‘Bangkok’ that took the King on various trips of voyage abroad to Singapore, Penang, Melaka, Kolkata, Bombay.

    In 1873, Sum-Ang was given title+name as Pra Preechakolakarn and appointed to do business about gold mine in the city of Kabin Buri and finally became the ruler of the city of Prachinburi in 1876.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-01-jpg


    In Bangkok, Pra Preecha (for short) built his house on the banks of the Chao Praya River. It was located near the foot of the (future) Memorial Bridge (Sapan Put) which at present, was replaced by Pra Poklao Bridge.

    His house was luxuriously western designed and was a distinguished house in the area.

    After his death, the authorities transformed his house to be a post office before being demolished to give way to the construction of Pra Poklao Bridge.

    However, his house was, later, duplicated and used as a museum of the Thai Post Affairs (related story on page 26/626 & 628).

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-02-jpg


    Because of his striking background, Pra Preecha was very welcome and well known among the high societies. On March 11, 1879, he married Fanny Knox, the daughter of the British Consul Thomas George Knox and his Siamese wife.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-03-jpg


    Later on, Pra Preecha was accused of "Killing and mistreating a lot of people in the city of Kabin Buri”. He was arrested and tethered.

    Knowing that this case was politically suspicious and the person who was behind was a Somdej Chao Praya (noble rank granted by the king) who was from another family, ‘Bunnag’, and also once a Regent to King Rama V when the King was being young, Pra Preecha’s father-in-law, Mr. Thomas George Knox, the British consul in Siam threatened the Regent to release his son-in-law otherwise he would detain the Regent in a British warship and ordered the British naval army to bombard Bangkok and after that he would bring this matter up to the British government.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-04-jpg


    When nothing had advanced, a British warship named Foxhound was steered in on April 12, 1879.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-05-jpg


    Meanwhile, Pra Preecha’s wife, Fanny, being pregnant, urged his father-in-law to approach another intervention to save her husband.

    Mr. Knox took the case to King Rama V asking him to help on this matter which he believed that his son-in-law was being wrongly framed by the Bunnag family which at the time was a big rival of the Amattayakul family (his son-in-law’s). Also, rumor had it that the Regent had wish for a son of his to marry his daughter, Fanny, in order to strengthen his power.

    King Rama V was always fond of Pra Preecha and made it clear that he had no wish to see the man punished if he was not guilty of the alleged crimes.

    Unfortunately, during this time, more scandalous rumors of Pra Preecha’s malfeasances were surfaced and a number of his ‘Amattayakul’ family members were also put under arrest with charges ranging from malfeasance to murder.

    Mr. Knox’s intervention in the affair was in vain and also cost him his post as Consul. He was recalled to London, where he was later granted the title Sir Thomas George Knox.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-06-jpg


    Back to Pra Preecha, his trial got underway in mid-1879. An article in The New York Times of April 12, 1880, said that “[the] trial is admitted by all intelligent persons to have been a complete farce, since he was not allowed to cross-question witnesses who accused him of murder, nor was he permitted to refer to his books when called upon to account for sums drawn by him as expenses for the gold mine.”

    Although Pra Preecha eventually admitted to stealing gold from the King’s mines, some believed he made the confession in the hope that he would be spared the cruel torture that so many criminals of that time suffered until they confessed.

    At last, Pra Preechakolakan was found guilty of all charges. He was stripped of his noble title and name to be back as Nai (= Mr.) Sum-Ang. His execution date was set for November 24, 1879. S
    ensing the brewing storm coming, he put all of his assets in his wife’s name.

    Not long before the execution took place, his wife, Fanny, departed to England along with her newly-born baby (who died later at the age of just 21) and two of Pra Preecha’s children from another marriage.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-07-jpg


    Note:

    1 - For centuries, inhabitants of Siam did not have surnames. They identified themselves by referring to their parents’ given names or the place they resided.

    The Siamese government started recording data on its citizens during the reign of King Rama V (1868–1910). The data recorded consisted of birth dates, dates of death, and household members. It was difficult to distinguish between citizens as many shared the same name.

    In 1912, two years after King Rama VI ascended to the throne, he declared that a birth, death, and marriage registration system would be instituted in Siam. Everyone had to bear a surname to identify them properly. In 1913, the first Surname Act was promulgated.

    2 - The story of Pra Preechakolakarn was finally become a novel titled “Fanny & Regent of Siam” which was penned by R. J Minney who admitted that the story was only 75% probable. Nevertheless, it has become a bestselling historical book in England.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-08-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 08-06-2021 at 10:19 AM.

  16. #891
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    At GI camp, Korat, 1966

    The guy on the left (photo 1) said he took this photo (2)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1966gicampkorat-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1966gicampkoratleft-tookphoto-jpg

  17. #892
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    Wat Pra Kaew, 1961

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1961-jpg


    Phuket, 1981

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1961-81phuket-jpg

  18. #893
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    At the royal funeral of Queen Sripatcharin, King Rama V’s Supreme Queen Consort (year of death: 1920), her son, King Rama VI, ordered two replicas of ‘Pig Memorial’ and ‘U Taga Tarn Shrine (means closely in English as Water Giving in Charity Shrine)’, of which the originals were located close together in the inner city or Rattanakosin Island, built within the site.

    (Read the details about 'why?' on page 27/652 and 9/215 respectively)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-04-01-jpg
    (Computer colored version)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-04-02-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-04-03-jpg
    (Computer colored version)


    After the cremation was done, those two replicas along with the other constructions were dismantled.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 09-06-2021 at 03:28 PM.

  19. #894
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    Some rare photos (computer colored versions) taken at the funeral of King Rama V’s Supreme Queen Consort (1864-1919). She was the Queen Mother of King Rama VI and VII. She died in the reign of King Rama VI.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-01-jpg
    (Her last official portrait)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-02-jpg
    (Her funeral pyre)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-03-jpg
    (The prototype of her coffin setting behind her royal urn on the crematorium)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-04-jpg
    (A set of royal tokens [4 items: a fan used during praying, a set of
    Buddhist Scriptures
    , a set of daily objects such as ‘alm bowl’, ‘flagon’ and etc., a pair of electric candle sticks] given to each monk who came to pray at the funeral)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-05-jpg
    (The day after the cremation, King Rama VI was collecting his mother’s ashes and put them in the royal cremation urn)


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-13-06-jpg
    (Her last residence before passing away was a mansion built in Payathai Palace on the location which is now
    Pramongkutklao Hospital close to Victory Monument)
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 10-06-2021 at 09:56 AM.

  20. #895
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    Wat Borwornsatan served as a royal wat for Wang Na thus no monks.

    The office of Wang Na was considered second only to the king and regarded as the heir presumptive.

    The status of Wang Na's Wat Borwornsatan was equal as the Grand Palace's Wat Prakaew

    (1956 & 2011)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1956-2011wborworn-jpg


    MacKenna theater, Ratcha Taewee, 1969 & 1974 (Shot from Asia Hotel)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1969-74-jpg


    Yaowarat, 1952 & 2017

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-19522017yaowarat-jpg


    Wat Yai Chaimonkol, Ayuthaya, 1957 & 2013

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-19572013-jpg


    Hoh Trai Scripture Library, Wat Pra Sinkha, Chiengmai,
    1934 & 1999

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-19341999hotraiscripturelibrarywatprasingcm-jpg

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 10-06-2021 at 02:46 PM.

  21. #896
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    The first person in Siam/Thailand who could learn and play harp professionally. Chudadhuj Dhdradilok, Prince of Petchaboon, King Rama V’s 8th child (1892-1923) from the Supreme Queen Consort. He was graduated from University of Cambridge and died at the age of 31.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-aa03-jpg
    (Computer colored version)

  22. #897
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    Grandfather of King Rama X’s, Mahidol Adolyadej, Prince of Songkla (1892-1929), King Rama V’s son born from one of his Queen Consorts, dressed in his navy officer uniform when he was still serving in the Ministry of the Navy in the reign of his elder half-brother King Rama VI.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-aa05-jpg
    (Computer colored version)
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 11-06-2021 at 09:25 AM.

  23. #898
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post



    MacKenna theater, Ratcha Taewee, 1969 & 1974 (Shot from Asia Hotel)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-1969-74-jpg



    I never quite understood the Mackenna phenomenon in Thailand. When the movie "Mackenna's Gold" came to Thailand it was a such a smash hit that it had a cinema run of over a year with people seeing it again and again. Then it got taken to a new level with a cinema being built and named after it. As far as I know, the movie didn't have such success anywhere else.

  24. #899
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    ^Was the name after that movie? I saw it some 50 years ago (not in Thailand) and I quite enjoyed it...

  25. #900
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    Somewhere they have hospitals McKenna...
    History – McKenna

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