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  1. #51
    Achieve By Unity cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    The text copied from various sources for I am not that good in formal English.
    Photos are from various sources too...
    Oh well.

  2. #52
    Achieve By Unity cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Let's eat...
    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Bua Loy Kai Wan
    Let's get laid!

    Attachment 52157

    Brigitte Bardot.


  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    ince 1964, the contest has entered the modern time and gone officially international by joining those international beauty contests.

    When did Thailand start banning the image of cigaretts ?

  4. #54
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Nice thread . . . different to Jeff's.

    Keep it going . . . never knew about the vultures. Is it a Buddhist 'thing'? I remember watching Nat'l Geo with my kids and there was a story on Nepal where they did the same thing - just let vultures eat the dead

  5. #55
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    CISCO999 - When did Thailand start banning the image of cigaretts ? (forgot to hit "reply with quote")


    Is this the answer to your question?



    at 0.47,

    1974 - Printed warning on the pack is preferable.
    1980 - Printed warning must be on either side of the pack.

    at 2.53,

    1990 - Printed warning must add the explanation of the side effects to the health of the smokers.
    1994 - Printed warning must contain bigger font for a clearer view.
    1998 - Printed warning must occupy 1/3 of the area on the pack. The warning must be shorter but more effective.
    2001 - Change from printed warning to pictured warning on 50% of the area of the pack
    2010 - The area is expanded to 55%
    2014 - The area is expanded to 85%
    September 10, 2019 - The recent package:

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-d407521b-jpg

    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 09-06-2020 at 10:06 AM.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Nice thread . . . different to Jeff's.

    Keep it going . . . never knew about the vultures. Is it a Buddhist 'thing'? I remember watching Nat'l Geo with my kids and there was a story on Nepal where they did the same thing - just let vultures eat the dead
    Thanks...

    Nope! It's just that there were too many of dead people to perform ritual funeral which took space and time while people kept dying. They did not know where to put them. One vulture happened to swoop by and see then shout "Hey guys, food court over here!"

  7. #57
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    70s...

    Chao Praya hotel on Sri Ayuthya road.

    Attachment 52202


    Narai hotel on Silom road with revolving restaurant on top.

    Attachment 52203


    Victory hotel on Silom road

    Attachment 52204


    King hotel on south Sathorn road

    Attachment 52205
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 09-06-2020 at 10:05 AM.

  8. #58
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    Let's eat...

    Or suan

    Attachment 52206


    Tao tung

    Attachment 52207

  9. #59
    Thailand Expat panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    One vulture happened to swoop by and see then shout "Hey guys, food court over here!"
    Fair call . . . though Thai food every day would be a bit tedious after a while


    (Your attachments are not showing)

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Fair call . . . though Thai food every day would be a bit tedious after a while


    (Your attachments are not showing)

    Thank you for your comments. Means a lot.

    The attachments showed after I posted and viewed. Today, they are gone...

    Oh, well... Happened often??

  11. #61
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    2 out of 4 mean no more..

    June Pointer (1953-2006)
    Bonnie Pointer (1950-2020)

    <span style="font-size:18.0pt">
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 10-06-2020 at 10:37 AM.

  12. #62
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    Ai dang, Bangmut


    In 1964, a giant man-eating crocodile was the subject of sensational headlines in local tabloids. Known as Ai Dang, the massive crocodile devoured men in Klong Bangmut in Chumpoon province. The name Dang (which means "spot") came from its mottled appearance. The black crocodile had a white stripe on its neck.

    In the old days, Klong Bangmut was covered with mangrove forest. Though the Klong was not wide but very deep, 6 meters, it was the great habitat for crocodiles.


    In the monsoon season, water filled the Klong creating flood all over and that was the perfect time for crocodiles to expand the area of food of which human beings were included. One of them was Ai Dang.


    During that time, people hardly traveled along that Klong for feared of Ai Dang and his friends.


    When the reputation went too far, the hunt, mainly for Ai Dang, began.


    Hunters set out to find and kill the crocodile several times without success. Some did and managed to shoot Ai Dang, but the reptile survived.


    Finally, three C3 clay bombs were dropped into the water. Ai Dang emerged in reaction to the explosions but he couldn't attack as people feared because one of the bombs broke his back. One of the hunters shot the crocodile through his neck with a harpoon.


    Ai Dang’s body was sold for 23,000 baht (the value at that time) to get preserved and displayed at freak shows.


    From head to tail, the crocodile measured 4.25 meters. When wide open, his mouth was 20 inches wide. Two human skulls and numerous bones were found inside the crocodile's stomach.


    The magnificent story of the hunt for Ai Dang has been adapted into two films released in 1988 and in 2005.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-006-jpg

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    Another big crocodile dated farther back in the old days. No details only photo.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 10-06-2020 at 10:07 AM.

  13. #63
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    Sukhumwit road in 60s-70s, here and there


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-2510-jpg


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-11-jpg


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    Memory Lane (In my own language)-2513-jpg



    One of my favorite cars, Citroen CX

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-3-jpg



    Soi Tong Loh, best pizza at that time...

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-3-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 10-06-2020 at 10:44 AM.

  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    2 out of 4 mean no more..

    June Pointer (1953-2006)
    Bonnie pointer (1950-2020)

    <span style="font-size:18.0pt">

    Sorry, confused. So many Pointers..

  15. #65
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    Fyi

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-jpg

  16. #66
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    Princess Vibhavadi Rangsit


    was a Thai writer and a member of the Thai Royal Family well known for her fiction writing and her developmental work in rural Thailand.

    She was killed by communist insurgents while on a routine visit to assist rural villagers in Surat Thani province.

    Princess Vibavadi often visited soldiers and Border patrol police stationed in areas where there was communist insurgency. On the morning of 16 February 1977, she set off on what should have been a routine visit to villages and to boost the morale of troops at Wiang Sa district, Surat Thani. While flying to her destination in an army helicoper, she heard a radio message saying two Border Patrol Policemen had been wounded by a landmine. She immediately ordered the flight diverted to pick up the wounded men and rush them to a hospital. As they flew at low altitude over Ban Nua Khlong, the helicopter was attacked from the ground by communist insurgents. A burst of heavy machine gun fire crippled the helicopter and seriously wounded the princess. She died one hour later.

    Prior to her royally sponsored cremation at Ratchabophit Temple, on 4 April 1977, "in recognition of her services to the country and the people", the king elevated her to the higher royal rank of Phra Chao Worawongse Ther Phra Ong Chao (Her Royal Highness) and awarded her the highest level of the most Illustrious Order of the House of Chakri.

    February 16 is now known in Surat Thani as Vibhavadi Day, and civil and religious ceremonies are held in her honor.

    Vibhavadi Rangsit Highway connecting Don Muang International Airport with Bangkok which known formerly only as “The Superhighway” was named after the beloved princess.



    Memory Lane (In my own language)-003-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-jpg
    "Don't let them (the communist insurgents) know that I was shot"


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    Last edited by nathanielnong; 11-06-2020 at 10:01 AM.

  17. #67
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    The most well-known ghosts of Thailand


    Krasue – Once a beautiful woman who was burned to death, Krasue is cursed to be forever hungry and so sets off each night in search of blood and flesh. Living as a normal person by day, by nightfall the head detaches from the body into quite the frightful sight. A floating head with viscera dangling below, Krasue will dine on animals or feces if she can’t find a pregnant lady or newborn baby, and will wipe her bloody mouth on clothes hanging outside — which is why Thais ensure not to leave cloths out overnight.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Krahung – Thought to occupy the same spaces as Krasue, Krahang is a male ghost who too spends his days in the guise of an ordinary villager but transforms at night. Shirtless and covered below the waist by a loincloth, Krahang takes to the skies with the aid of rice baskets acting as wings, and has been blamed for attacks on women in local villages.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Nang Tani – A beautiful woman in a green traditional Thai dress and with a deep red lipstick, Nang Tani occupies banana trees and entices men during full moons into having sex with her. Should they then betray her and love another, they’ll meet an untimely death at her hands. Other than this, she’s said to be benevolent, and is even said to feed passing monks!

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Nang Takean - A beautiful female ghost that dwell in ‘takean’ trees which are often used to make boats and houses. When done, Nang Takean will become their guardian spirit (Mai Ya Nang). If they are ill-treated in anyway, they can be dangerous.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Pee Pob – Thought to roam around the northeastern region of Isan, Pee Pop is a fearful ghost who possesses the bodies of her victims and hunts for raw meat, before eventually eating their intestines from the inside. Those who are thought to be possessed by Pee Pop need to undergo an exorcism, in the form of a dance, which drives the ghost away. To this day, Pee Pop is blamed for deaths in both Thailand and Laos.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Pret – Said to be as tall as a palm tree, Pret are ghosts that are prominent in Buddhist folklore. Ungrateful and materialistic people are reincarnated as Pret, a tall being with a ravenous appetite that can’t be satisfied by its tiny, pinhole mouth — which it earned from talking back to its parents. Pret spend their days begging for forgiveness and merits.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Pee Tai Tong Klom – A ghost of a woman who dies during childbirth. She is very possessive of her husband and fierce.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Pee Tai Hong – One of the most feared and most dangerous ghost types in Thailand. Pee Tai Hong are ghosts of people who suffered violent or sudden deaths. Not being able to move on, Pee Tai Hong are always angry and dangerous in their afterlife. The most feared of all are those who died in an frightening accident. Very difficult to exorcise, they’re not somebody you’d want to meet on a backstreet off Khao San Road.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Pee Um - Anybody who has ever suffered from sleep paralysis may want to stop reading now. Pee Um is a ghost who is said to sit on the chests of people whilst they sleep, causing discomfort and even death.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg



    Pee Khamot - a luminescent ghost

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg


    Pee Kong Koy – A one-legged ghost with a protruding proboscis that repeats “Kong Koi” whilst hopping around, Kong Koi dwells in forests and sucks blood from the toes of campers who are sleeping. It’s advised to either cross your legs or sleep with something on your feet if you’re planning to camp out under the stars.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg


    Kuman Thong - There aren’t many things scarier than ghost children, and this Thai variation is particularly creepy. Stillborn fetuses are roasted and chanted to be a necromancer, before being covered in gold foil and placed by a shrine. The ghost is then said to adhere to their master’s bidding, providing it is kept happy by placing food and toys near to the fetus. Failure to keep it entertained or happy will see their masters subjected to poltergeist-esque behaviour such as the slamming of door and the all-too-creepy sound of ghost children laughing. Despite kuman thong today being widely replaced with dolls, as recently as 2012 a British businessman of Taiwanese origin was found with six fetuses covered in gold in Bangkok, proving perhaps the practice isn’t as dead as many think.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg


    Rak-yom - Appearing as two small boys similar to Kuman Thong but famous as charm twins.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg


    Nang Kwak - A spirit or household divinity commonly dressed in red Thai style clothing. She is deemed to bring good fortune, prosperity, attracted customers to a business, and found among merchants.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg


    Pee Phong - A foul-smelling ghost who appears as a normal person in the daytime, Pee Phong feeds on unpleasant foods such as frogs, forcing many to stay indoors if they hear the noises of frogs nearby for fear of bumping into him. Whilst not especially dangerous to humans, Pee Phong will attack if threatened and there’s the risk of becoming one yourself should you accidentally ingest his saliva.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg


    Pee Taboh - A blind ghost with hollow eyes.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg


    Pee Ka-noon – Disguise as beautiful and sexy women haunting by jack fruit (ka-noon) trees surrounding Sanam Luang at night. They prey on drunk and horny men. If you are one, beware...

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg

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    Last edited by nathanielnong; 12-06-2020 at 09:49 AM.

  18. #68
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    This clip is very good. It reminds me of what my grandparents described to me how our family welcomed guests in the old days.

    In the middle of the year 1939, the former prime minister of Thailand promoted a campaign to encourage citizens to quit the habit of chewing betel quid. He also ordered to cut down all the maak trees throughout the country. Maak chewing was also banned in government buildings. This started an anti-betel chewing trend; those who chewed Maak in government buildings were declined services from the government. This was to promote modern society and clean up the city because the people would spit red residue out onto the streets, which stained the cities and roads which was seen as dirty and
    unhygienic.

    The campaign gradually worked but not for the elders who had gone too far, addicted. My grandmother told me that she obeyed the government's campaign and quit immediately and that caused her swoon and sick. When I was very young my great grandfather used to let me try chewing betel quid... Yuck! He laughed his head off once seeing the expression on my face.

    At the end of the clip, "panung" or "sarong" is adjusted to become more official called "jong krabane".





    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx02-jpg

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx02-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 15-06-2020 at 09:23 AM.

  19. #69
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    Phra Sumen Fort


    One of the two ancient forts (the other one is Maha Kan Fort) from 14 forts built around Bangkok in the reign of King Rama I (1737-1809) to defend the city against river invasions.

    Named after the mythical Phra Sumen (Mt. Meru) of Hindu cosmology, the octagonal brick-and-stucco bunker was sited now in Santi Chai Prakan park in Banglamphu.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-jpg  
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 16-06-2020 at 09:05 AM.

  20. #70
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    Wat Yannawa, Bangkok

    Built by King Rama III (1788-1851) as a token for the people to remember the old wooden junks that brought so much prosperity to the Thai Kingdom. The "ship" is made of concrete and has two chedi where the masts would ordinarily be located and the altar, the stern wheelhouse. Wat Yannawa was very popular for many Chinese residents of this part of Bangkok.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-02-jpg


    Wat Cha – loh, Nonthaburi

    Originally built in the late of Ayuthaya Kingdom (1350-1767) and has been renovated from time to time. At present it is in the shape of the royal barge “Suphannahong”.


    Memory Lane (In my own language)-xxx01-00-jpg

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    Last edited by nathanielnong; 16-06-2020 at 09:30 AM.

  21. #71
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    The capital of Thailand

    Then known as Pra Nakorn province, the name of the capital of Thailand (1782 -), and Thonburi province, the name of the former capital of Thailand (1767-1782), the two provinces were divided by Chao Praya River. They were merged in 1971 and given the new name as “Nakorn Luang Krung Tep Thonburi” then a year later “Krung Tep Mahanakorn (same meaning as Los Angeles, kind of)”. Anyway for foreigners, they usually know as Bangkok.

    So, the capital of Thailand is called by 2 different names. We, Thais, call it Krung Tep Mahanakorn while you, foreigners, call it Bangkok.

    Actually, the name “Krung Tep Mahanakorn” is not the whole name, just a nickname. The official name is very long "Krungthepmahanakhon Amonrattanakosin Mahintharayutthaya Mahadilokphop Noppharatratchathaniburirom Udomratchaniwetmahasathan Amonphimanawatansathit Sakkathattiyawitsanukamprasit".

    That’s why we just say the nickname instead. If we said the whole name, the listeners would drop dead before we finish.

    Anyway, when translated into English, you will get this: "City of angels, great city of immortals, magnificent city of the nine gems, seat of the king, city of royal palaces, home of gods incarnate, erected by Visvakarman at Indra's behest."

    As the name consists of 169 letters (I didn’t count) thus, the Guinness world record has declared it the place that has the longest name in the world. It is longer than New Zealand’s mountain "Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateaturipukakapik imaungahoronukupokaiwhenuakitanatahu" which consists of, only, 85 letters.

    The province’s seal: Hindu god Indra with a vajra in his hand on the mythological four-headed elephant Erawan (Airavata).

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-001-jpg


    The tree: Ficus benjamina (Ficus tree - Sai yoi)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-002-jpg

    The animal: Catlocarpio siamensis (Giant barb - Pla Kraho)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-003-jpg
    Last edited by nathanielnong; 17-06-2020 at 10:47 AM.

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    Yah Leh

    Yah Leh was the name of a dog who was very close to the heart of King Rama VI (1881-1925). He was a mixed breed dog born in the prison in Nakhon Pathom province. King Rama VI found him when he inspected the prison. Yah Leh was very fortunate to have caught the eye of the King and was brought back to the Royal Palace in Bangkok.

    The King named him Yah Leh (Thai pronunciation) after the leading character 'Emile Jarlet' from the French play titled 'My friend Jarlet' from which he translated and adapted into Thai play titled 'Mit Tae (True friend)'

    Yah Leh was a very smart and loyal dog. There was a tale told that once Yah Leh saw a courtier not dressing properly, he charged towards and bit that man in front of the King. That incident humiliated the guy so much.

    Yah Leh being a boot licker surely captured the King's heart. He even had a special collar with a badge printing “The King’s dog, who find this dog running astray please return him to the King”. At the same time, he created enemies in the royal court. Generally, everyone in the royal court envied and hated Yah Leh.

    In the 5th year that Yah Leh was adopted by the King, one day he was found dead by the Palace’s wall. He was shot by a gun. The bullet was of special type thus a special gun. Whoever owned such gun had to be one of the royal courtiers with some rank.

    The King VI was much saddened. He put the dog’s body in a special coffin gilded with gold and held a funeral. Also, he commanded that a copper statue of Yah Leh be made and placed on a pedestal in front of Phra Tamnak Chali Monkol-asna in Sanam Chantra Palace in Nakorn Prathom province where he first met the dog. The King also composed a poem for his beloved Yah Leh which was inscribed below sculpture.

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    Last edited by nathanielnong; 18-06-2020 at 09:18 AM.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanielnong View Post
    Thank you for your comments. Means a lot.

    The attachments showed after I posted and viewed. Today, they are gone...

    Oh, well... Happened often??
    Yes, it happens often. I don't know why nobody has bothered to fix it. It's annoying, I know ...

    Thank you so much for your wonderful thread. Just wonderful!!

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wally Dorian Raffles View Post
    Yes, it happens often. I don't know why nobody has bothered to fix it. It's annoying, I know ...

    Thank you so much for your wonderful thread. Just wonderful!!

    Thank you very much for your very kind compliments...

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    Once upon a time there were a lot of roundabouts scattering here and there around Bangkok.

    Now, some have disappeared without a trace. Some have been renovated while some still stand proudly.


    Bukkaloh roundabout – Not even an old photo

    Sri Ayuthya roundabout – Not even an old photo


    Rachatewee roundabout (early 70s) - Now, an intersection

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-00-jpg


    Patumwan roundabout (early 70s); Now an intersection. The forest over there now, Siam Discovery and Siam Center. the white building was Siam Intercontinental hotel.

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-01-jpg


    Lek (small) roundabout (60s) - Now an intersection. The clock tower has disappeared. No one knows what happened to it. Such a shame

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-02-3-jpg


    Yai (Big) roundabout - Then (60s) and now. Built in 1932, the statue of King Taksin the Great was built 21 years later. Also known as King Taksin Monument roundabout

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-03-3-jpg


    Odeon roundabout - Then (60s) and now

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-04-3-jpg


    Pra Putayodfa bridge or Sapan Put (Memorial bridge) roundabout - Then (early 70s) and now

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-05-5-jpg


    July 22, roundabout - Then (60s) and now; built in 1918,
    "22 July" comes from the date Thailand declared WWI, which corresponds to 22 July 1917 (the reign of King Rama VI (1881-1925))

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-06-22-02-jpg


    Victory Monument roundabout - Built in June 1941 to commemorate the Thai victory in the Franco-Thai War (King Rama VIII)

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-07xxx-jpg


    Democracy Monument roundabout - Built
    in 1939 (King Rama VII) to commemorate the 1932 Siamese Coup D etat (also called "Siamese Revolution of 1932" or just "1932 Revolution") which led to the establishment of a constitutional monarchy in what was then the Kingdom of Siam

    Memory Lane (In my own language)-08xxx-jpg

    Last edited by nathanielnong; 19-06-2020 at 09:36 AM.

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