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  1. #151
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ootai View Post
    I always thought the bending was made possible due to some slight flew at the joints of rods rather than the rod itself.
    Your correct to a large extent, the "bending" comes from the tool joint when drilling, the BHA (Bottom Hole Assembly) is made up of Drill collars that are a lot heavier than the drill pipe, these days most directional drilling is done with motors, but traditionally when rotary drilling adding shorter components to the BHA, which gives more tool joints which gives more "bending" capability.
    All tubular s that are used for drilling are inspected, there are comprehensive inspection procedures in place as failure can be Very expensive.
    Example below:- probably not the greatest explanation!
    Random offshore pics-1-png
    Last edited by Airportwo; 30-01-2020 at 09:06 AM.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airportwo View Post
    these days most directional drilling is done with motors

    Ok, where are the "motors" and how to they "turn" the pipe to the correct compass heading/angle up or down??

    I'm under the impression a "drill bit" is, placed at/screwed too, the end of a "drill pipe". It's lowered down to the sea bed and clamps on the drilling "table", which rotates whilst gripping the pipe, then twists the drill bit and drill pipe until the length of pipe above the "drilling table" reduces to a certain length.

    The drilling table stops, another "string", if that the correct term, is screwed onto the top of the drill pipe, the drilling table then starts to rotate again rotating, the new drill pipe, the old drill pipe and the drill bit. This is repeated until the drill bit reaches the desired depth. All the time the broken up rock is forced to the surface with water/fluid and dumped back in the sea.

    Presumably if the drill bit wears out or breaks, the whole pipe length has to brought up and the bit replaced.

    As described that system works, due to gravity, for a vertical hole, but nowadays "directional drilling", the pipe being driven at an angle or even horizontal, requires a "steering" mechanism, yes?

    How is the drill bit and thus the attached pipe, orientated/steered to adjust the slope angle/direction? Does the drill bit have the "motors" which can be adjusted to, reorientate, the bit and hence direction?



    (An interested, but ignorant of the oil/glass drilling industry procedures, TD sponge.)
    Last edited by OhOh; 30-01-2020 at 05:03 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  3. #153
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    Great thread, takes me back to my days on the rigs, pity the 2nd gulf war came about, rigs closing down around Denmark and Holland.

    never saw half the stuff you guys are posting though.

  4. #154
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    How is the drill bit and thus the attached pipe, orientated/steered to adjust the slope angle/direction? Does the drill bit have the "motors" which can be adjusted to, reorientate, the bit and hence direction?
    You have a surface readout of the direction the hole is being drilled, there are quite a few different systems available, for a long time now we have been drilling horizontal sections of hole that are accurate to less than 1m.
    Have a look at this:- Directional drilling - PetroWiki
    This probably better:- Directional Drilling: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know - Drillers

    Rotary drilling, as you mention is still used, though the actual "Rotary" has been replaced by a Top Drive or power swivel, Rotary steerable systems are very popular now!
    Last edited by Airportwo; 30-01-2020 at 06:19 PM.

  5. #155
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    Thanks.

    It appears my "bit screwed onto the end of a pipe" has been superseded.

    I blame the TV:



    It can grow to a, metres in length, precision piece of kit. With "location sensors" and controllable, from the rig above, "motors/adjusters/ .... which allow the bit/pipe to be steered. To infinity and beyond.

    One example;

    Random offshore pics-gp-jpg
    Last edited by OhOh; 30-01-2020 at 07:18 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  6. #156
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    ^ What you have posted is Halliburtons offering, as below is Schlumberger's "Auto-Trak" the huge advantage of RSS is the pipe is rotating, you don't get stuck like you do with a non rotatable motor, most of the time!
    Random offshore pics-autotrak-curve_web-jpg

  7. #157
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    I'll accept you experience and judgment.

    One doesn't want a sticky ending a few km under the sea and possibly a few more km away from the rig. A time consuming job I suspect and to oil companies, time is a very precious commodity.

    My choice of image was purely on what I perceived as an example illustrating a method of curving the cutting face, by moving the centre of the rotating bit head pipe using a rotating cam and hence pulling the rest of the pipe on a path away from the previous straight line.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  8. #158
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    My choice of image was purely on what I perceived as an example illustrating a method of curving the cutting face, by moving the centre of the rotating bit head pipe using a rotating cam and hence pulling the rest of the pipe on a path away from the previous straight line.
    Years back, 40 or so years they used to make bits that you could point in one direction, then basically control pound it into the ground, the old motors (Dyna-Drills) used to have a bent sub on the bottom that you had to physically change for what angle of build you wanted, usually they were 1 or 2 deg, we used to scribe a line from the bent sub bend to surface and work from the scribe line, at best it was messy as you have to limit the amount of build you get and gets difficult to control the azimuth, easy now, makes it possible to drill where it was previously too expensive due to time. Cost per foot of hole is a lot cheaper, when you take in the cost of drilling a decnt hole at around 5m - 50,000,000 savings are substantial.

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barty View Post
    Onshore, every welded joint is x-rayed by a third party sub contractor and the x-rays are then signed off by the project owners consultant. This keeps the inspection and approval out of the main contractors hands. I assume that off shore would be a similar process.



    Repairs can be made to damaged pipelines. From a simple clamp that fits over the damaged portion of the pipe to having a full hot tap bypass where long sections of pipe can be replaced.

    The same offshore. Every weld is X-rayed by a third party, either offshore, or in the case of the reel lay method, mainly onshore at the yard.

    Once the pipeline is laid, we perform an immediate as-laid survey to check the external condition of the pipeline, coating and joints. After any remedial works (mattress laying, gravel dumping, trenching, etc) and flooding, an as-built survey is performed. The external condition, position (geographical and UTM) and water depth of each weld will be recorded. The documentation is now immense... but it's work!

    Once laid, repairs to welds are very expensive. Divers can perform hyperbaric welds in suitable water depth (either performed wet or in an artificial dry environment) but this is at huge cost; ie several million Sterling per weld.

    In my experience weld failure is extremely rare, and in fact in 30 years offshore I can only think of one instance, although plenty of leaks occur at flanges and connections at subsea structures, especially after shutdowns where normal operating pressure is reduced.

    The one instance of weld failure to memory was around 2000 with a small diameter flowline laid in the Norwegian Sector of the North Sea. This was a reel lay, and on pressure testing after the lay, a weld started to leak gas. Insurance covered a hyperbaric weld repair, and then the line was pressured up again... and another weld leaked gas. I think the insurance was duty bound to cover a certain number of hyperbaric welds before it was accepted the line had no integrity and was abandoned... at phenomenal cost! It is still there today (now trenched below the seabed).

    To memory the problem was due to experimenting with 13% chromium in either the steel or the weld material (this is not my area!!!) to make it easier to handle? The method was pushed through by the client, and therefore was not down to contractor negligence, however I'm sure the lawyers had their hands full.

  10. #160
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    I've posted may pictures of work vessels on this thread, and here is a picture of a picture hanging on my office wall (sorry for the appalling quality).

    This was the boat I started my career on in 1991...a converted stern trawler built in 1967. It would fit on the back deck of the boats I work on today.

    No HSE, rare PPE, abundant alcohol, and great fun!


  11. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    In my experience weld failure is extremely rare, and in fact in 30 years offshore I can only think of one instance, although plenty of leaks occur at flanges and connections at subsea structures, especially after shutdowns where normal operating pressure is reduced.
    So hopefully, the pipelines will not be cut by Russians, similarly as they can cut the subsea communication cables, as we were recently warned by UK govt.

    In fact, most of the pipelines belongs to Russians, so why they would do it?

  12. #162
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    So hopefully, the pipelines will not be cut by Russians, similarly as they can cut the subsea communication cables, as we were recently warned by UK govt.
    Don't think "they" would need to bother with the pipelines, just cut all the subsea fiber optic cables that interconnect everything, all the valves "should" failsafe and close - job done!

  13. #163
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Good picture! legs on the Jackups will be +400' to give some scale.

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Random offshore pics-0-jpg  
    Last edited by Airportwo; 10-02-2020 at 01:53 PM.

  14. #164
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    Doing a seismic survey north of Wrangel Island in the Russian Arctic and came across Mum and her cub swimming to a new bit of ice.


    Random offshore pics-ma-cub-jpg


    Same place, but this Polar bear's ancestors must have shagged a Grizzly at some time.

    Random offshore pics-swimming-jpg



    A seismic survey that took us up the Fly river in PNG. Tide left us high and dry on a mud-bank. We got off on the next high tide.

    Random offshore pics-319334_3655176852658_740478204_n-jpg


  15. #165
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    You must have worked for "Western Geo"? that self same vessel is still floating, she is in the Gulf of Guinea, as below, in harbour today! (Blue circle)
    Random offshore pics-2020-png

  16. #166
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    Yes, I know. Now called Orient. I look at Marine Traffic now and again to see where all the boats I worked on are today.........most of them are now razor blades.
    Worked for Western Geo from 1975 to 2001. It really was "a circus without a tent", otherwise named by many of it's employees as Western Geopharcical. Great fun and good times. It's all got very serious now.

  17. #167
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    Did you ever work with Digger Tomkinson?

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shy Guava View Post
    Did you ever work with Digger Tomkinson?
    Yes I did! John Tomkinson! Poor old Digger. Died of cancer about a year after he retired. He was going to open up a stamp shop in Australia. Used to live in Lampung.
    One of life's true gentleman. His long suffering wife was called Noi?

    How did you know him?
    Last edited by Attilla the Hen; 11-02-2020 at 11:55 AM.

  19. #169
    Thailand Expat Airportwo's Avatar
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    Esberg harbour, wind farm erection MP vessel.
    Random offshore pics-0-jpg

    Random offshore pics-0-1-jpg

  20. #170
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Attilla the Hen View Post
    Yes I did!
    what about Bluey Dean ?

  21. #171
    Thailand Expat HermantheGerman's Avatar
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    Great thread Mendip !

    Thank you for keeping Teakdoor alive.

    Want to see any pictures of my fritteuse*?
    That's about as close to oil as I can get.



    *microtechnically processed kitchen steel that - integrated into the deep fryer - automatically checks the decomposition of
    cooking oils even at high temperatures.

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by baldrick View Post
    what about Bluey Dean ?
    Oh Christ! Bluey Dean! Haven't heard that name in a long time. He was head of navigation out of the Singapore office, then later moved into the Perth office.
    Don't know if he was a mate of yours, so, I won't say anything else.

  23. #173
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    Deleted.
    Last edited by Attilla the Hen; 11-02-2020 at 02:48 PM.

  24. #174
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    Mendip, I would say that the reason for flaring whilst drilling is that they may have an Underbalanced Drilling (UBD) package onboard. This will deal with any pressure encountered during drilling, separate the oil/gas/water/solids then flare it off. Overbalanced (conventional) Drilling will use drilling fluid, mud, to create a higher pressure in the wellbore than in the reservoir. The problem with this is that the mud will also be forced into the formation and significantly reducethe production rate of the well. So UBD is basically Well Testing while drilling. I'm starting a new job in this service line tomorrow and I'm quite excited about it.
    Lang may yer lum reek...

  25. #175
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    I also worked on CLOV for 13 weeks at the DSME Shipyard in Geoje Island, South Korea. We were doing the Pre-Commissioning Nitrogen/Helium Leak Testing. I remember it took like 3 days to pump the HP Flare system up to pressure. The thing was massive but the Shell Prelude dwarfed it.

    I gort that whole trip on a tax free day rate while they prepared my staff contract. Went home and bought a Harley then I was skint again.
    Lang may yer lum reek...

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