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  1. #1
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    Is MOVING BANGKOK the only solution to FLOODING problem

    Is MOVING BANGKOK the only solution to FLOODING problem






    The mighty #ChaoPhraya runs through the central plains and down into the flooding delta before heading out into the Gulf of #Thailand. Great place for a city.

    Not surprisingly Bangkok suffers floods whenever the big rains come with most of the low-lying land around the delta only averaging around 1.5 meters above sea level.
    Whilst the city used to have a complex system of canals to help carry the floodwaters out of the city, most of them have now been filled in whilst the urban mass has spread, now housing around 10 million people.
    The city has also tried to counter the sever floods by installing larger drains, bigger pumps and trying to manage the Chao Phraya’s floods habits better.
    But the metropolis is now being threatened by two major threats.

    Firstly, the land is sinking. The city of Bangkok was developed on soft clay land where the Chao Phraya meets the Gulf of Thailand.

    After the fall of Ayutthaya (north of Bangkok) to the Burmese Empire in 1767, the newly crowned King Thaksin established his new capital at the port town, which became the base of the Thonburi Kingdom and then later the Chakri dynasty (on the east side of the Chao Phraya).

    As Bangkok grows, the accumulated weight of the city is literally pushing Bangkok into the soggy clay it’s built on.
    The National Water Resource Commission approved a US$412 million plan to combat drought and floods as well as improve drainage in May this year but fending off rising waters from the city when the rains come will become an increasingly impossible task, no matter how much money is thrown at the problem.
    The other threat is the rising oceans and the effects of climate change, already being detected and noted in the city’s predictions and disaster plans.
    Under a major case study the city is expected to experience around 40% inundation by an extreme rainfall event and 15 centimetre sea-level rise by 2030.
    A World Bank report entitled ‘Climate Risks and Adaptation in Asian Coastal Megacities’ identified Bangkok – as well as Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City – as having experienced nearly a two-fold increase in damage costs between 2008 and 2050 due to land subsidence

    It is predicted that almost 70% of the increase in flooding costs in 2050 for Bangkok will be due to land subsidence.
    Short of physically relocating much of Bangkok to higher ground, the city’s planners and engineers have limited time to work out the best way to protect the ‘Venice of the East’ from ending up like its Venetian counterpart. – TheThaiger





    I am not a liberator , Liberators do not exist , The people liberate themselves , Ernesto Che Guevara .
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  2. #2
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    Does Buririam flood?

  3. #3
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    This BBC report paints a particularly damp prospect

    https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-50236882

  5. #5
    The Fool on the Hill bowie's Avatar
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    Yup - moving Bangkok is the best solution, flood prevention/protection been tried before...




    Well, could always ask the Italians for advice

    http://www.water-technology.net/projects/mose-project/

    Venice is under serious threat due to the rise in sea level and sinking of land at an alarming rate. The MOSE project will protect the Venetian Lagoon from being submerged by the Adriatic Sea and protect the famous city of Venice and the neighbouring areas from flooding. It is expected to be operational by 2014.

    "When completed, it will safeguard Venice and the villages located within the Venetian Lagoon from flooding, and prevent the further rise of the sea level."
    MOSE, the Italian word for Moses, is an acronym for Modulo Sperimentale Elettromeccanico, which means Experimental Electromechanical Module. The name aptly alludes to the story of Moses parting the Red Sea.

    The project will prevent flooding through the installation of 78 mobile gates at three inlets, namely Lido, Malamocco and Chioggia, which will separate the Venetian Lagoon from the Adriatic Sea.

    Consorzio Venezia Nuova has been entrusted to carry out the project by the Venice Water Authority, with Astaldi holding a share in the project. It is a consortium of Italian construction companies, co-operatives and firms which are experienced in operating the lagoon.

    The construction work on the project began in 2003 after much delay. As of June 2012, 75% of the work at the site has been completed. The project is expected to be fully completed by 2014. When completed, it will safeguard Venice and the villages located within the Venetian Lagoon from flooding, and prevent the further rise of the sea level.

    Background to the Modulo Sperimentale Elettromeccanico (MOSE) project
    The Great Flood of 1966, which caused massive loss of life and property, and the sinking of the city by 11 inches during the course of the last century, provided the momentum and necessity to protect Venice. The reasons for the sinking of the city of Venice are principally attributed to the rise in the sea level and extraction of ground water and methane gas within the vicinity of the Venetian Lagoon.

    "MOSE, the Italian word for Moses, is an acronym for Modulo Sperimentale Elettromeccanico, which means Experimental Electromechanical Module."
    MOSE took shape after being loomed over by a number of consultations and controversies. The proposal to provide a safe measure from flooding dates back to the 1970s. In 1973 a Special Law was enacted, under which six project proposals were accepted after invitations from Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR) and later taken up by the Ministry of Public Works in 1980.

    The feasibility study for the proposals were completed in 1981 under a project named Progettone, which proposed the setting up of fixed barriers at the inlets, including mobile defence structures.

    The second Special Law of Venice to provide criteria and strategies took shape under a committee known as the Comitatone, which enabled the Ministry of Public Works to grant a single concession for the companies agreed upon by private negotiation.

    In 1982 Consorzio Venezia Nuova was entrusted by the Water Authority to design and implement the measures to safeguard the city, which was presented in 1989 under a project named Riequilibrio E Ambiente (REA), which translates as Rebalancing and the Environment. It provided an abstract design of the mobile barriers at the lagoon inlets and was finally approved in 1994 by the Higher Council of Public Works.

    The first environmental impact study was accepted in 1998 and was improved in 2002. Construction work of MOSE finally started in 2003.
    Floodgates and components of the Venetian Lagoon project

    A total of 78 mobile gates are being laid at the bottom of the seabed as part of the MOSE project. They are 92ft long, 65ft wide and will weigh 300t. The mobile gates being laid at the bottom of the inlet channel are supported by 125ft long steel and concrete pilings, measuring 500mm in diameter and 20m in length, driven into the lagoon bed.

    The floodgates consist of a metal box structure. Compressed air is pumped into the structure when a tide of more than 110m height is expected. The air will rise up the barriers to the surface of the water to block the flow of the tide and prevent water from flowing into the lagoon.

    Floodgates are hollowed at the bottom, to allow the blowing of compressed air. They will be filled with water and lowered into the seabed when there is no harm of flooding. The floodgates at each inlet will function independently depending on the force of the tide expected.

    The MOSE project also includes strengthening of the coastal areas, raising the quaysides and paving of the city.

    Contractors involved with Venice’s MOSE scheme In.Te.Se costruzioni d’acciaio designed and constructed two hydraulically self-propelled loading carriages for the project. The loading carriages are being used in moving and positioning the reinforcing piles vertically.

    The batching plants used for construction in the MOSE Project are supplied by SIMEN.

    Financing the flood protection project
    The total investment for constructing the MOSE Project is estimated at €7bn ($8.8bn). CIPE (Interministerial Committee for Economic Programming) financed the project in three instalments, of €450m ($568m), €709m ($896m) and €380m ($480m) respectively, in November 2002, September 2004 and March 2006.

    In addition, CIPE financed €243m ($307m) in August 2007, €400m ($505m) in January 2008, €800m ($1bn) in December 2008, €230m ($290m) in November 2010 and €600m ($758m) in December 2011. The remaining funds required for the project will be looked after by the Committee for Policy, Coordination and Control (Comitatone).


    And by the way – it didn’t work, well, at least not yet – now completion in 2022

    http://www.businessinsider.com/venice-mose-flood-gates-storms-2018-11

    A $6.5 billion sea wall was supposed to stop Venice from flooding. Now, most of the city is underwater.

    Italy was overtaken this week by a series of storms that toppled trees, flooded streets, and resulted in at least 11 deaths. In the "floating city" of Venice, famous tourist attractions like St. Mark's Basilica and the Piazza San Marco were partially submerged in water, with the city's tourism hotspots being evacuated.

    Though the flooding is the worst the city has seen in a decade, it isn't entirely unexpected: Autumn to spring marks flooding season in Venice, or "acqua alta" — a period of exceptionally high tides in the Adriatic Sea.

    In 2003, Italy began building a massive flood barrier designed to isolate the Venetian Lagoon, the enclosed bay where Venice is located. The project, known as Mose, is one of the largest civil engineering endeavors in the world.

    The design consists of 78 mobile gates stationed at three different inlets. When the tide reaches 43 inches (which happens around four times a year), the gates will rise above the water's surface and protect the lagoon from flooding. When the tide dips, the gates fill with water and lower back in place.

    The total barrier spans one mile and weighs around 300 tons. Though many see it as necessary to the city's immediate safety, the project has been shrouded in controversy and criticism.

    While citizens have long worried about the high cost of construction, which recently climbed to around $6.3 billion, the municipality of Venice has questioned the barrier's stability in the face of rising sea levels. Both environmental groups and the EU Commission have also expressed concern that construction would pollute the local habitat.

    The biggest obstacle arrived in 2014, when then Mayor Giorgio Orsoni was arrested alongside 35 other people on corruption charges related to the project. Orsoni was accused of accepting bribes in exchange for awarding contracts, but he was absolved three years later.

    Now, Mose is being held up in its final leg of construction. The flood gates were originally set to open around 2011, but some officials don't expect them to be ready until 2022. As the project continues to stall, many have warned that mold and marine life are eroding the underwater structure.


  6. #6
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    I hope they don't move the capital back to Chiang Mai, that will fuck it right up.

    Build a brand new capital in the middle of rice monkey territory, that's where most of the fuckers live anyway.

  7. #7
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    It's obvious that most don't know why the natural flood plain/basin becomes a mess, annually, more so than in the past.

    Don't know why they bother.
    Spinning the same old rhetorical and rectifying nonsense.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    It's obvious that most don't know why the natural flood plain/basin becomes a mess, annually, more so than in the past.

    Don't know why they bother.
    Spinning the same old rhetorical and rectifying nonsense.
    Everyone knows Jeff. Bangkok is sinking down to meet the rising seas.

    It even says so in the article you dumb shit.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Why don't they ask the Dutch for assistance?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Why don't they ask the Dutch for assistance?
    They would be more suited to asking New Orleans.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Why don't they ask the Dutch for assistance?
    They did and the Dutch built the Klongs. Which are now being filled to build streets.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    I hope they don't move the capital back to Chiang Mai, that will fuck it right up.

    Build a brand new capital in the middle of rice monkey territory, that's where most of the fuckers live anyway.
    Don't know if I count as a 'fucker', but...

    A huge amount of money has been spent/invested in Korat the last few years.

    A new motorway connecting Korat to Bangkok being built, a new high speed rail link planned and not shelved like some others. A new Terminal 21 that is currently mainly devoid of customers, but apparently planned for long term investment. Likewise for the new Central Mall. One new international standard hotel (Kantary) recently opened and another similar planned. And huge numbers of good quality condos being built. Korat is currently thriving and they're even (partly) addressing the awful traffic with new ring roads and bypasses. There is even talk of an elevated light railway MTS system around the centre with theoretical plans published.

    All this money isn't being spent for nothing and Korat has transformed over the last few years. Rumours are of government offices relocating...

    I'd still rather live somewhere else, mind.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    ^
    As much as they've spent on the place Korat still floods every year. Having watched Thais, over the last 14 years, try to control the water problem near my house I'd say they're fcuking useless. Korat would be another Bangkok. The more you develop it the bigger the problem.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    Why don't they ask the Dutch for assistance?
    They save face by refusing to ask native English speakers to scribble out basic signs and notices, so why on earth would they risk major losses by requesting gov level assistance in such a critical situation? Much better to lose Bangkok; face saved, a few at the low end sacked and prosecuted to satisfy the people, loads of money to be made salvaging whatever's left and moving the entire city uphill, and those that do notice won't dare to mention it.

  15. #15
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    more outboards is the solution.


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