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  1. #1
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    Introduction to Aristotle

    Learning to ask the right questions is no longer taught in schools today...


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    Exsistential Earl piss on earth and goodwill to all men


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    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Part III

    What share insolence and avarice have in creating revolutions, and how they work, is plain enough. When the magistrates are insolent and grasping they conspire against one another and also against the constitution from which they derive their power, making their gains either at the expense of individuals or of the public. It is evident, again, what an influence honor exerts and how it is a cause of revolution. Men who are themselves dishonored and who see others obtaining honors rise in rebellion; the honor or dishonor when undeserved is unjust; and just when awarded according to merit.

    Again, superiority is a cause of revolution when one or more persons have a power which is too much for the state and the power of the government; this is a condition of affairs out of which there arises a monarchy, or a family oligarchy. And therefore, in some places, as at Athens and Argos, they have recourse to ostracism. But how much better to provide from the first that there should be no such pre-eminent individuals instead of letting them come into existence and then finding a remedy.

    Another cause of revolution is fear. Either men have committed wrong, and are afraid of punishment, or they are expecting to suffer wrong and are desirous of anticipating their enemy. Thus at Rhodes the notables conspired against the people through fear of the suits that were brought against them. Contempt is also a cause of insurrection and revolution; for example, in oligarchies- when those who have no share in the state are the majority, they revolt, because they think that they are the stronger. Or, again, in democracies, the rich despise the disorder and anarchy of the state; at Thebes, for example, where, after the battle of Oenophyta, the bad administration of the democracy led to its ruin. At Megara the fall of the democracy was due to a defeat occasioned by disorder and anarchy. And at Syracuse the democracy aroused contempt before the tyranny of Gelo arose; at Rhodes, before the insurrection.

    Political revolutions also spring from a disproportionate increase in any part of the state. For as a body is made up of many members, and every member ought to grow in proportion, that symmetry may be preserved; but loses its nature if the foot be four cubits long and the rest of the body two spans; and, should the abnormal increase be one of quality as well as of quantity, may even take the form of another animal: even so a state has many parts, of which some one may often grow imperceptibly; for example, the number of poor in democracies and in constitutional states. And this disproportion may sometimes happen by an accident, as at Tarentum, from a defeat in which many of the notables were slain in a battle with the Iapygians just after the Persian War, the constitutional government in consequence becoming a democracy; or as was the case at Argos, where the Argives, after their army had been cut to pieces on the seventh day of the month by Cleomenes the Lacedaemonian, were compelled to admit to citizen some of their Perioeci; and at Athens, when, after frequent defeats of their infantry at the time of the Peloponnesian War, the notables were reduced in number, because the soldiers had to be taken from the roll of citizens. Revolutions arise from this cause as well, in democracies as in other forms of government, but not to so great an extent. When the rich grow numerous or properties increase, the form of government changes into an oligarchy or a government of families. Forms of government also change- sometimes even without revolution, owing to election contests, as at Heraea (where, instead of electing their magistrates, they took them by lot, because the electors were in the habit of choosing their own partisans); or owing to carelessness, when disloyal persons are allowed to find their way into the highest offices, as at Oreum, where, upon the accession of Heracleodorus to office, the oligarchy was overthrown, and changed by him into a constitutional and democratical government.

    Again, the revolution may be facilitated by the slightness of the change; I mean that a great change may sometimes slip into the constitution through neglect of a small matter; at Ambracia, for instance, the qualification for office, small at first, was eventually reduced to nothing. For the Ambraciots thought that a small qualification was much the same as none at all.

    Another cause of revolution is difference of races which do not at once acquire a common spirit; for a state is not the growth of a day, any more than it grows out of a multitude brought together by accident. Hence the reception of strangers in colonies, either at the time of their foundation or afterwards, has generally produced revolution; for example, the Achaeans who joined the Troezenians in the foundation of Sybaris, becoming later the more numerous, expelled them; hence the curse fell upon Sybaris. At Thurii the Sybarites quarrelled with their fellow-colonists; thinking that the land belonged to them, they wanted too much of it and were driven out. At Byzantium the new colonists were detected in a conspiracy, and were expelled by force of arms; the people of Antissa, who had received the Chian exiles, fought with them, and drove them out; and the Zancleans, after having received the Samians, were driven by them out of their own city. The citizens of Apollonia on the Euxine, after the introduction of a fresh body of colonists, had a revolution; the Syracusans, after the expulsion of their tyrants, having admitted strangers and mercenaries to the rights of citizenship, quarrelled and came to blows; the people of Amphipolis, having received Chalcidian colonists, were nearly all expelled by them.

    Now, in oligarchies the masses make revolution under the idea that they are unjustly treated, because, as I said before, they are equals, and have not an equal share, and in democracies the notables revolt, because they are not equals, and yet have only an equal share.

    Again, the situation of cities is a cause of revolution when the country is not naturally adapted to preserve the unity of the state. For example, the Chytians at Clazomenae did not agree with the people of the island; and the people of Colophon quarrelled with the Notians; at Athens too, the inhabitants of the Piraeus are more democratic than those who live in the city. For just as in war the impediment of a ditch, though ever so small, may break a regiment, so every cause of difference, however slight, makes a breach in a city. The greatest opposition is confessedly that of virtue and vice; next comes that of wealth and poverty; and there are other antagonistic elements, greater or less, of which one is this difference of place.
    Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, Part 3.
    The Internet Classics Archive | Politics by Aristotle

  4. #4
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    it's a must read for sure,

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    Aristotle - not bad. Could't play bridge for toffee though.

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    Did he learn classic Greek, Aristotle ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pseudolus View Post
    Aristotle - not bad. Could't play bridge for toffee though.
    Takes a back seat to the likes of Confucius...


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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Takes a back seat to the likes of Confucius...

    Good to see you use the Western form of his name.

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    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    Good to see you use the Western form of his name.
    , 孔夫子, , , .....among others. If it makes you more comfortable, Bob.


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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    孔丘, 孔夫子, 仲尼, 褒成宣尼公, 至聖先師....
    That's easy for you to say.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    , 孔夫子, , , .....among others. If it makes you more comfortable, Bob.

    next time click on your links before pasting them, just to check

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Earl View Post
    Learning to ask the right questions is no longer taught in schools today...
    In today's digital society one would think this is more important than before?

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    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    In today's digital society one would think this is more important than before?
    Indeed, asking the right search engine questions are sometimes quirky.

    But Aristotle was asking questions about life, existence, nature, and much more.
    Aristotle was all about empirical observation, not the stale peer reviewed so called scientific method tought in modern corporate sponsored government education/brainwashing/programing

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    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    顏射, 尿褲子, 飲精, 触手攻击, 膀胱絕望.....among others. If it makes you more comfortable, Bob.


    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    next time click on your links before pasting them, just to check
    Yes, you don't want to come across as suffering from raving sinophilia like OhOh.

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    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Might be the preference, rather than appearing to be a raving delusional Eurocentric apologist.

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