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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by wasabi View Post
    What language is that, ^ the survivors speak, it's not English.
    Not everyone speaks English, and i think from the beginning it was obvious it was not a vid in English.

    One language i love to sometimes watch is the clicking language. Yesterday i went through a gruelling interview about a drugs trial for three hours in French, even though i know that the doctor speaks fluent English. I know the terminology better in French, having learnt it over the past few months.

    Some people love to learn languages, can learn them. And others don't and won't. Each to their own.
    Last edited by patsycat; 24-05-2017 at 07:07 AM.

  2. #102
    ENT
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    Languages are lovely, all evolving to fulfill needs.
    I've studied comparative linguistics, a real adventure in exploring how why and when words change as they progress from one locus to another over time.

    Some surprising 'finds', indices of ancient travel lines across the globe, linked to artefacts and activities, largely, giving clues of who met up with who in the eternal game of trade and exchange.

    One surprising study is that of the rightly termed Alpine languages, anciently a possible common language, spoken by hill tribes and societies stretching from Scotland, across all of Europe and Asia to South America.

    I'd love to learn more.
    “Is it not written in your Law, ‘I said, you are gods’? John 10:34.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by wasabi View Post
    What language is that, ^ the survivors speak, it's not English.
    Assamese hill tribe languages,...mainly Naga.
    Well you posted the video so you should know. The only member to know what language it is.

  4. #104
    ENT
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    That may be because I was born and brought up in Assam.

  5. #105
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    My course this term is called, 'descriptive linguistics' as a matter of fact.

    Looks to be pretty intense (based on the reading list alone) but I thoroughly enjoy the subject and (it's just started, so) simply the references and/or direct implications made in our assigned readings (especially) in regards to:

    development of 1st language in child development, endangered languages, ancient languages, code-switching, idiolect, the use of whole-word measuring and other modern terminology and methodology, have really jumped off the page for me.




    Why did I come here? Oh yeah...


    On topic,

    from sum udder guy:


    "An isolated defensible relatively sustainable bug out location (BOL) isn't all that expensive, if you are frugal, plan well, bought the land at a bargain price, have relatively decent construction, gardening/livestock skills, etc., & BOL family members donate their skills & labor.

    I bought our 18.86 acre off-grid old growth timbered BOL site about 25 years ago. Intended use was for a simple hunting/fishing get-a-way cabin. Over those 25 years it morphed into what it is today.

    Defensible, multiple buildings, space to bunkhouse 20 (24 in a pinch), piped water, septic/drain-field system, flush toilets/hot showers, 25KW Pelton turbine hydroelectric generator system, more amenities & better Comm's than our home in town, fuel tanks, barn/sheds, livestock, chicken coup, fenced 2 acre productive garden, 5 acre pasture, orchard, vineyard, root cellars, etc.

    It has been a teaching/learning center for the youngsters of all the involved skills it took get it where it is, rent/room & board free housing for family members who needed it, family get-together site, hunting/fishing vacation paradise, honeymoon site, boot camp for wayward youngsters, drug rehab site, quite adult refuge when marriages were in trouble, a school for myriad survival/gardening/ranching/farming skills & served voluminous other useful purposes.

    If I had it to do over again, I would not do much different. Our BOL was the foundation & mortar that held/holds out family together. It's pays it's way, is now in a funded "trust" so it may serve generations to come & my ashes will be scattered there.

    The best time to plant an orchard was 20 years ago, the 2nd best time is now. The same holds true acquiring a BOL (if possible)."

  6. #106
    ENT
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    Sounds really nice, a bit like some of the communes I've lived at from time to time.

    Good for you doing the linguistics study, something I'd like to do when I get a bit more free time.

  7. #107
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    Well, it's one course in an MA in Edu, but thanks.

    Really want to finish. On the fast-track and have about a year to go.

    After that I'd like to get a degree in film scoring and then BUG OUT!!

  8. #108
    Your local I.Q. Monitor
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    The only thing they are trying to survive is their own paranoia

  9. #109
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    ^It's a bit like "Boy Scouts" for grown-ups.

    Grown-ups with mental / drug problems.

  10. #110
    ENT
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    Better than hanging out on a verandah waiting for the first sangsom of the day, or looking forward to watching footy on a pub's widescreen with a load of pissed up "mates", all bleating and hissing at the world that's not theirs.

  11. #111
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    Are those our only two choices?

  12. #112
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    Being prepared is not a bad nor crazy thing. I live in earthquake and volcano country. I have a kit that has various items that I would need to survive in those instances. It is just common sense.

  13. #113
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    The term "prepper" means having more than a kit...we are talking about people who go to extraordinary lengths and end up consuming vast amounts of personal resources (time and money) in pursuit of being ready for low probability events.

  14. #114
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    ...now here's a prepper event that's a tad more likely:

    If a nuclear bomb explodes nearby, here's why you should never, ever get in a car
    Dave Mosher

    Nuclear blasts create fallout, which can harm you with large doses of radiation.
    Cars offer little protection from fallout.
    A surer way to survive in the aftermath of a nuclear explosion is to go indoors, stay put, and listen to the radio.
    The first thing you'd see if a nuclear bomb exploded nearby is a flood of light so bright, you may think the sun blew up.

    Wincing from temporary blindness, you'd scan the horizon and see an orange fireball. The gurgling flames would rise and darken into purple-hued column of black smoke, which would turn in on itself. As a toadstool-like mushroom took shape, the deafening shock front of the blast would rip through the area — and possibly knock you off your feet.

    Congratulations! In this hypothetical scenario, you've just survived a nuclear blast with an energy output of about 10 kilotons (20 million pounds) of TNT. That's roughly 66% of energy released by either atom bomb dropped on Japan in 1945.

    This scenario may sound far-fetched, but more than 14,900 nuclear weapons exist in the world, and kiloton-class nukes (like the one we just described) are now proliferating in favor of larger weapons. In fact, a 10-kiloton-or-less nuclear detonation by a terrorist is the first of 15 disaster scenarios that the US government has planned for.

    No one could fault you for panicking after the sight and roar of a nuclear blast. But there is one thing you should never do, according to Brooke Buddemeier, a health physicist and radiation expert at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    "Don't get in your car," he tells Business Insider — don't try to drive, and don't assume that the glass and metal of a vehicle can protect you.

    ...more Prepper info here: If a nuclear bomb explodes nearby, here's why you should never, ever get in a car - Business Insider
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  15. #115
    ENT
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Being prepared is not a bad nor crazy thing. I live in earthquake and volcano country. I have a kit that has various items that I would need to survive in those instances. It is just common sense.
    I did the same in NZ, the gov. there advises us all to do so.

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    largely, giving clues of who met up with who in the eternal game of trade and exchange.
    Being fluent in one Polynesian dialect (on top of Melanesia Fijian), as I learn more Thai I'm finding just too many coincidental similarities. Not lots, but more than what could be simply coincidence.

  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Being prepared is not a bad nor crazy thing. I live in earthquake and volcano country. I have a kit that has various items that I would need to survive in those instances. It is just common sense.
    I did the same in NZ, the gov. there advises us all to do so.
    Same. Tools, candles etc of course. But I always have to remember to replace the hard tack food stores every year or 3.
    Vacuum packed rice, dahl and powdered milk are my major food deposits.


    WTF has happened to you ENT? I'm agreeing with you so often these days?

  18. #118
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    US military rations work in a pinch but roman noodles and a good fire stove are splendid.

  19. #119
    ENT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maanaam View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ENT
    largely, giving clues of who met up with who in the eternal game of trade and exchange.
    Being fluent in one Polynesian dialect (on top of Melanesia Fijian), as I learn more Thai I'm finding just too many coincidental similarities. Not lots, but more than what could be simply coincidence.
    Have a look at the similarity between the Timorese and Maori languages.

  20. #120
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    ^ Maori is a Polynesian dialect.
    I haven't a clue about Timor.

  21. #121
    ENT
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    Tetun passa (Tetun paca), has many nouns and numbers similar to Maori.
    Place names and given names are very similar also.

  22. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by ENT View Post
    Tetun passa (Tetun paca), has many nouns and numbers similar to Maori.
    Place names and given names are very similar also.
    I'm guessing "passa" is the same as Thai "pasa" or Malay "bahasa"....language or speak.
    Polynesian "pati" or "pasi" is "speak.

  23. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    roman noodles and
    ramen candles, that's how I'm goin' out!!

  24. #124
    ENT
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    ^ ^ Yup, also as in "pasa Pathet Lao", or "pasa khon Thai".
    Have a look at a map of Timor for some place names, very Maori like.

  25. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by hick View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    roman noodles and
    ramen candles, that's how I'm goin' out!!
    Aren't Roman noodles vermicelli?

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