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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Care for a Bit of Lamping?

    ...I came across this bit from a Brit newspaper:

    "When later interviewed by police, Mr Stables said he had been out lamping with a friend but denied poaching. He said they stopped at Mr Hugill's farm to let the dog out."

    ...Aren't sheep more popular than dogs for this sort of thing?
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  2. #2
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    Think it means, they where using spotlights to find animals to shoot. Maybe they spotted a boar or a cute bunny rabbit out of target range so they set the dog onto it to maul it to pieces.
    Then they realised that they where hunting on someones farm land and where caught.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    ...using spotlights? Isn't that...unsporting?

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
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    Whatta lovely culture...

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat

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    The CPS is increasingly staffed by fucking idiots inspired by their DPP who is perhaps the worst Director since the post was established over 200 years ago.

    That they could consider such a daft prosecution against an utterly blameless citizen defending his property against lower class scumbag ne'er-do-wells is symptomatic of their stupidity. Alison Saunders, the incumbent DPP, is a suburban drag-up and the first DPP to have been promoted from within the ranks of their shiny-arsed clerks and, boy, doesn't it show.

  7. #7
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    A friend of mine used to go lamping (last century) and I went out with him a couple of times. Animal's eyes can be spotted quickly and easily by scanning the lamp across the field. Different colour eyes indicate different animals - or something like that.

  8. #8
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    Dogs are used to either chase and catch the animal or to retrieve it once it is shot.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna
    Dogs are used to either chase and catch the animal or to retrieve it once it is shot.
    If its small game, witch I know nothing about cause I usually just drill it with .22

    We use them to corner and exhaust prey. Or 'tree' them. Then pick them off. Or roost them out of hides etc.. Rarely do the dogs to the 'hunting' where I'm from.

    This 'lamping' is highly illegal in a lot of instances, again, where I'm from. Most of the time you cant even hunt legally at night. Same as using night vision to kill deer & stuff.

  10. #10
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    Yes, mostly small game - rabbits. But he occasionally got bigger game and had shotguns (12 bore, 10 bore and a 410 IIRC) and maybe a rifle; I forget - it was a long time ago.

  11. #11
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    The lads I know go for foxes and to dig badgers
    It's illegal I'm sure but they enjoy it
    Not for me

  12. #12
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    Self defense laws in the UK appear to be less than cut and dry. From the BBC;


    "What about if someone shoots?


    The most recent case was that of Andy and Tracey Ferrie. They were in bed when two burglars entered their home. Mr Ferrie fired his (legally-held) shotgun at the men. The couple were arrested but then released without charge.

    The judge at the intruders' trial said: "If you burgle a house in the country where the householder owns a legally held shotgun, that is the chance you take. You cannot come to court and ask for a lighter sentence because of it."

    The most well-known case is Tony Martin. In 1999, the Norfolk farmer shot dead an intruder in his home. He was jailed for life for murder but the Court of Appeal then reduced that to manslaughter. He served three years in jail."

    Q and A: Self defence and burglars - BBC News

    Poor Tony had to do time for protecting his home. How does that make sense?

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    So, lamping isn't a sport then...it's a way to bag game to eat...or do folks kill game animals just because they're there?...

  14. #14
    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    sounds so ripe with innuendo and euphemism.


  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsnub View Post
    Self defense laws in the UK appear to be less than cut and dry. From the BBC;


    "What about if someone shoots?


    The most recent case was that of Andy and Tracey Ferrie. They were in bed when two burglars entered their home. Mr Ferrie fired his (legally-held) shotgun at the men. The couple were arrested but then released without charge.

    The judge at the intruders' trial said: "If you burgle a house in the country where the householder owns a legally held shotgun, that is the chance you take. You cannot come to court and ask for a lighter sentence because of it."

    The most well-known case is Tony Martin. In 1999, the Norfolk farmer shot dead an intruder in his home. He was jailed for life for murder but the Court of Appeal then reduced that to manslaughter. He served three years in jail."

    Q and A: Self defence and burglars - BBC News

    Poor Tony had to do time for protecting his home. How does that make sense?
    The burglar in question was retreating and tried to leave the premises when he was blasted. I can't quite recall the exact circumstances but in summing up the judge may not have guided the jury properly that residual fear may still have operated on the mind of Tony and as such the defence of self defence was perhaps still valid in acquitting on the murder count but convicting on the manslaughter charge.

    The couple were in bed when the intruder burgled their home and in those circumstances they were judged to have used reasonable force in defending themselves against a threat which by definition they could not gauge and therefore in discharging the weapon he was acting proportionately. Ultimately, if anyone enters your home in the dead of night and you are in fear of your life then you can you use lethal force as long as that fear still operated on your mind.

    If you turn the lights on, get your shotgun and launch yourself down the stairs screaming like a banshee and discover a 14 year old, unarmed boy trying to exit through the patio door screaming he was sorry and pleading not to shoot, and you then bifurcate him with both barrels, a murder charge would seem reasonable.

    Ok?

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum
    as long as that fear still operated on your mind.
    ...how would a judge (or jury) determine such a state?...

  17. #17
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    One relies on the evidence and common sense.

    There is also the factor to be taken into consideration that one cannot weigh one's actions to a nicety when acting in extremis. If you are scared stiff and fear for your life and the adrenaline is pumping with no avenue of escape open to you, you may well act in a manner that later in the cold light of day might seem excessive but that is not to your detriment - awakened from a sleep in the silent hours by an armed intruder intent on mayhem generally justifies whatever response is provoked until the threat recedes demonstrably, or until you are certain of receiving assistance.

    Pursuing the intruder half way down the street after he escapes, stabbing him in the eye with a kitchen knife is taking the piss and constitutes revenge, or knocking the intruder out cold and then as he lies there unconscious you slit his throat just to make sure the risk is terminated permanently is not good at all.

    All depends on the circs and the evidence.

  18. #18
    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    residual fear may still have operated on the mind of Tony and as such the defence of self defence was perhaps still valid in acquitting on the murder count but convicting on the manslaughter charge.

    The couple were in bed when the intruder burgled their home and in those circumstances they were judged to have used reasonable force in defending themselves against a threat which by definition they could not gauge and therefore in discharging the weapon he was acting proportionately. Ultimately, if anyone enters your home in the dead of night and you are in fear of your life then you can you use lethal force as long as that fear still operated on your mind.

    If you turn the lights on, get your shotgun and launch yourself down the stairs screaming like a banshee and discover a 14 year old, unarmed boy trying to exit through the patio door screaming he was sorry and pleading not to shoot, and you then bifurcate him with both barrels, a murder charge would seem reasonable.

    Ok?
    Both points seem reasonable up to a point... you certainly might want to scare intruders away, but might be scared of them returning with reinforcements... and with the latter example, reasonable up to a point, save that "in the heat of the moment"/panic and groggy from sleep, an "accident" could happen, where visibility is constrained by the dark, and things are happening quickly.
    Obviously they are also trying to accommodate the hypothetical where someone innocent is somehow prompted to come to a property, where they are killed, and the covert murderer uses self-defence as a plea to get away with it.
    It seems a bit of a "Murder She Wrote" kind of scenario - a bit of a stretch... there are probably more effective ways.
    Last edited by CaptainNemo; 11-03-2017 at 07:06 PM.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQVmkDUkZT4

    we are all figments of our own imagination.

  19. #19
    Fresh Seaman CaptainNemo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seekingasylum View Post
    Pursuing the intruder half way down the street after he escapes, stabbing him in the eye with a kitchen knife is taking the piss and constitutes revenge, or knocking the intruder out cold and then as he lies there unconscious you slit his throat just to make sure the risk is terminated permanently is not good at all.
    Depends where you live, perhaps? Certainly in the UK, that would be unusual.
    In the remote countryside anywhere, it's probably a bit different from one of the infested urban areas, where hard drugs and hard crime seem to dominate, to different extents, depending on where you are.

  20. #20
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat
    So, lamping isn't a sport then...
    depends how is is pursued

    if you blind the sheep with the spotlight , sneak up behind it and whack your cock in

    and hang on for 8 seconds

    that is quite a sporting achievement

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    8 seconds? Give the sheep a chance to notice, I say...

  22. #22
    disturbance in the Turnip baldrick's Avatar
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    ^ that may be well your experience

    I have not passed my personal best of 5 seconds for many years and I suspect it may well stand as I get older and not as atheletic

  23. #23
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    Lamping is also common in Thailand, our villagers put out neon fluorescent lights at night with a plastic sheet and bucket and " the crickets get caught in the headlights."
    EI EI yum yum

  24. #24
    Custom user Neverna's Avatar
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    ^ Yes, and lamping for frogs is very common in Thailand.

  25. #25
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna
    lamping for frogs is very common in Thailand
    indeed, bargirls know the French are sensitive to light...

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