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  1. #1
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    What is the burial/cremation procedure for the King?

    The wife and I are confused:

    From my understanding, a deceased person will lie in state for 3-9 days with people visiting.

    Then the body is moved to the temple where the hand washing ceremony happens.

    Next, the body is cremated. The ashes are interred for a number of days and then relics from the ashes are bestowed on members of the family.

    Now the King has had the hand washing ceremony and his urn is on public display. Yet the Princess is building a crematorium for the King, which is indicative of the King's body not being cremated yet. If the King's body isn't cremated, what's in the urn mourners are being allowed to view?

    Could someone (I'm actually saying this, "Help Jeff!") explain the process to me?

  2. #2
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    Up to one year for him before he is cremated.

    What We Can Expect For King Bhumibol?s Funeral Rites

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    The cremation will not take place for at least 100 days for a member of the Royal Family. In this case it has been said that the cremation will take place in a year's time and , almost certainly, at a specific date decided by the Sangha.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sangha

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    Yes, I remember reading about the 1 year frame...Interesting read on Mao...

    Preserving Chairman Mao: embalming a body to maintain a legacy...

  5. #5
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    Oh...so when they say "urn" the proper term in English would be "coffin"

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    When his sister passed away, they took a long time building a special pavilion for the funeral at cost of almost $9 million.

    I would imagine this one will be far more elaborate, expensive and time consuming.

    (Not meant in any derogatory way of course).

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda
    When his sister passed away, they took a long time building a special pavilion for the funeral at cost of almost $9 million.

    I would imagine this one will be far more elaborate, expensive and time consuming.

    (Not meant in any derogatory way of course).
    I remember, it took almost a year to build....

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    Interesting stuff...And we're living it...From the ground up, so to speak...

  9. #9
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    "Kot" - The hardened clay box most bodies are interred in I guess translates as urn.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CSFFan View Post
    The wife and I are confused:

    From my understanding, a deceased person will lie in state for 3-9 days with people visiting.

    Then the body is moved to the temple where the hand washing ceremony happens.

    Next, the body is cremated. The ashes are interred for a number of days and then relics from the ashes are bestowed on members of the family.

    Now the King has had the hand washing ceremony and his urn is on public display. Yet the Princess is building a crematorium for the King, which is indicative of the King's body not being cremated yet. If the King's body isn't cremated, what's in the urn mourners are being allowed to view?

    Could someone (I'm actually saying this, "Help Jeff!") explain the process to me?
    I would humbly defer to the likes of DrBob, Norton, or others whom might know the technical royal procedures, more so than I. Yet, the basics mentioned above are more honorary than practical - even in this age.

    The actual cremation will take place reasonably soon with public notice and extended ceremonial activities forthwith - without viewing, as this usually will be an in-palace affair [sort to speak]. And in the said year's time a very public and formal Phra Meru ceremony will go forth - going through the motions of burial/cremation.

    Personally, I might have two points of great interests - the fascination that will bed itself for me would be the speculation of how grandiose the final Phra Merumas complex/structure will be.....I'm imagining that HM King Bhumibol will command a great complex as his Grandfather [Chulalongkorn] did.

    Secondly, if the succession coronation does come about, will such an event take place within the same week as the Phra Meru ceremony? If so, how extravagant might we expect from this epeisodia ceremony??

  11. #11
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    Stock up for October 2017.

    Also invest in bullet proof windows for your cars and property.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Up to one year for him before he is cremated.

    What We Can Expect For King Bhumibol?s Funeral Rites
    Good explanation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CSFFan View Post
    The wife and I are confused:

    From my understanding, a deceased person will lie in state for 3-9 days with people visiting.

    Then the body is moved to the temple where the hand washing ceremony happens.

    Next, the body is cremated. The ashes are interred for a number of days and then relics from the ashes are bestowed on members of the family.

    Now the King has had the hand washing ceremony and his urn is on public display. Yet the Princess is building a crematorium for the King, which is indicative of the King's body not being cremated yet. If the King's body isn't cremated, what's in the urn mourners are being allowed to view?

    Could someone (I'm actually saying this, "Help Jeff!") explain the process to me?
    Thai Royal Funerals are held 100 days after death although for a King of Bhumibol's stature there's a possibility that those 100 days may be extended..

    The first ceremonies held after death were the royal bathing rites after which the body will lie in state in the Dusit Maha Prasit Throne Hall. The coffin will be placed near the Great Golden Funeral Urn, Pra Kot Tong Yai, which was originally created for the funeral ceremonies of King Rama I. Usually the body would be placed inside the urn, 'kot' in Thai, but I've read recently that the coffin would be placed beside or under the urn instead. There are further ceremonies on the 7th and 15th days after death. The body will lie in state for 100 days. The urn will be surrounded and topped by Maha Savetta Chatra, 9-Tiered Golden Umbrellas, which only a reigning monarch can use.

    Monks will chant in the throne hall from dawn to dusk for the full 100 days.

    At about this time building will start on the Pra Merumas, the cremation pyre, in Sanam Luang. This will take most of the year to complete and will cost in the region of a million USD. I haven't seen any designs but normally the Pra Merumas is hugely ornate. It will be topped by another 9-tiered umbrella. The Merumas represents Mount Meru, the abode of Vishnu. The spirits of Thai Kings, as incarnations of Shiva, Indra and, obviously and primarily, Rama, travel to Mount Meru after death. Going by the Merus of previous kings expect this one to be over 100 metres tall.

    The funeral itself will take place over 7 days. The coffin and urn will be taken from the throne hall and a small procession will take it anti-clockwise around the palace. A much larger procession, probably the largest ever seen in Thailand, will escort the body to the cremation grounds. The coffin will be placed on a huge golden catafalque (Phra Maha Phichairajrot) and will be pulled to Sanam Luang by soldiers in traditional dress. The Supreme Patriarch will walk in front of the catafalque chanting Buddhist scripture.

    Monks and Brahmins will perform rituals around the cremation pyre and invited guests will place sandalwood flowers on the pyre. Only a small part of the pyre will be burnt. After the cremation the rest will be taken down and the wood sent to temples around the country.

    After the cremation, in a tradition revived for the funeral of the King's sister, there will be shows of traditional music, dancing, theatre, and shadow puppetry. These will involve thousands of artists and will go on for days.

    Finally the King's ashes will be placed in the base of a Buddha Statue in one of the Royal temples, I don't know if the name of the chosen temple has been announced yet.

    Most of this will be televised, make sure to watch it you can't physically be there. A full Thai Royal funeral showcases traditional Siam in all its glory and for many of us it will be a once in a lifetime experience.
    Last edited by DrB0b; 18-10-2016 at 06:36 PM.
    The Above Post May Contain Strong Language, Flashing Lights, or Violent Scenes.

  14. #14
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    Thanks, Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by CSFFan View Post
    The wife and I are confused:

    From my understanding, a deceased person will lie in state for 3-9 days with people visiting.

    Then the body is moved to the temple where the hand washing ceremony happens.

    Next, the body is cremated. The ashes are interred for a number of days and then relics from the ashes are bestowed on members of the family.

    Now the King has had the hand washing ceremony and his urn is on public display. Yet the Princess is building a crematorium for the King, which is indicative of the King's body not being cremated yet. If the King's body isn't cremated, what's in the urn mourners are being allowed to view?

    Could someone (I'm actually saying this, "Help Jeff!") explain the process to me?
    Thai Royal Funerals are held 100 days after death although for a King of Bhumibol's stature there's a possibility that those 100 days may be extended..

    The first ceremonies held after death were the royal bathing rites after which the body will lie in state in the Dusit Maha Prasit Throne Hall. The coffin will then be placed near the Great Golden Funeral Urn, Pra Kot Tong Yai, which was originally created for the funeral ceremonies of King Rama I. Usually the body would be placed inside the urn, 'kot' in Thai, but I've read recently that the coffin would be placed beside or under the urn instead. The body will lie in state for 100 days. The urn will be surrounded and topped by Maha Savetta Chatra, 9-Tiered Golden Umbrellas, which only a reigning monarch can use.

    Monks will chant in the throne hall for the full 100 days.

    At about this time building will start on the Pra Merumas, the cremation pyre, in Sanam Luang. This will take most of the year to complete and will cost in the region of a million USD. I haven't seen any designs but normally the Pra Merumas is hugel ornate. It will be topped by another 9-tiered umbrella. The Merumas represents Mount Meru, the abode of Vishnu. The spirits of Thai Kings, as incarnation of Shiva, Indra and Rama, travel to Mount Meru after death. Going by the Merumas of previous kings expect this one to be over 100 metres tall.

    The funeral itself will take place over 7 days. The coffin and urn will be taken from the throne hall and a small procession will take it anti-clockwise around the palace. A much larger procession, probably the largest ever seen in Thailand, will escort the body to the cremation grounds. The coffin will be placed on a huge golden catafalque (Phra Maha Phichairajrot) and will be pulled to Sanam Luang by soldiers in traditional dress. The Supreme Patriarch will walk in front of the catafalque chanting Buddhist scripture.

    Monks and Brahmins will perform rituals around the cremation pyre and invited guests will place sandalwood flowers on the pyre.

    After the cremation, in a tradition revived for the funeral of the King's sister, there will be shows of traditional dancing, theatre, and shadow puppetry. These will involve thousands of artists and will go on for days.

    Finally the King's ashes will be placed in the base of a Buddha Statue in one of the Royal temples, I don't know if the name of the chosen temple has been announced yet.
    Ta, Bob.
    Very sound...


  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CSFFan View Post
    Thanks, Bob
    No worries. I wonder if that post will get deleted too

  17. #17
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    Good write up Bob.

    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b
    but I've read recently that the coffin would be placed beside or under the urn instead.
    Heard same. Placed under in a special refrigeration unit.

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    Thanks Bob and contributors.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b
    At about this time building will start on the Pra Merumas, the cremation pyre, in Sanam Luang
    Princess to have final say over pyre | Bangkok Post: news

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    Has it been explained why the King's remains were taken from Siriraj to Wat Pra Kaeo in a van. Felt a bit too austere.

    I noticed mourners were looking down the road as the van passed them, almost as if they were looking for the hearse

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by CR7CristianoRonaldo
    I noticed mourners were looking down the road as the van passed them, almost as if they were looking for the hearse
    Being that the Thai's have no idea what a hearse is I sort of doubt it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by CR7CristianoRonaldo
    I noticed mourners were looking down the road as the van passed them, almost as if they were looking for the hearse
    Being that the Thai's have no idea what a hearse is I sort of doubt it.
    Are you suggesting that there might be a culturally-centric standard as to how Thai protocol should be designed?

  23. #23
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    ??? I said the Thai's do not what a hearse is. Take a deep breath and think about it culturally.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by CR7CristianoRonaldo
    I noticed mourners were looking down the road as the van passed them, almost as if they were looking for the hearse
    Being that the Thai's have no idea what a hearse is I sort of doubt it.
    Thais I have spoken to expected a different mode of transport. For example, with some flowers on it.

    What was used before vans (with frosted windows) were invented? Perhaps some kind of royal carriage. There must be some precedent other than a transit van.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CSFFan
    I'm actually saying this, "Help Jeff!")
    I oughta red you for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b
    Most of this will be televised, make sure to watch it you can't physically be there. A full Thai Royal funeral showcases traditional Siam in all its glory and for many of us it will be a once in a lifetime experience.
    Thanks for the information, I will be sure to watch it.

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