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  1. #26
    Harbinger of Doom

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    That list seems pretty unlikely to me. Turkmenistan has a better quality of life that the UK? Turkmenistan is a poverty-stricken hell-hole ruled by thugs and maniacs.
    Quite. Saudi Arabia seems to be a better place to live than most of Europe. Israel is also suspiciously high up the rankings. Perhaps they neglected to add the risk of having your hands chopped off or a 1000 lb bomb dropped on your house to the algorithms they use to calculate this.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjblaney View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers
    I've already retired in Thailand, so I guess the question is moot for me.
    I presume you have a Thai retirement visa. So do I. I've been retired in Thailand for the past couple of years. I still consider my options open. For a Thai retirement visa I have to prove that I have income in the amount of approx. $2000 USD/mo. or have approx. $25000 USD in a Thai bank account. There are 3 types of residence visas you can obtain in Ecuador: 1) proof of $800/mo. in income to obtain a Pension's residency visa. 2) Buy a CD worth $25,000 from a lending institution approved by the Ecuadorian government to obtain an Investment visa. 3) Buy a home with a tax value of at least $25,000 to obtain a Real Estate visa. Consider this also (from Expat 101: Ecuador Visas Made Easy)
    If you are 65 or older you are eligible for phenomenal extra benefits—free medical care and medications, half-price bus transportation anywhere in the country, half-price tickets to movies plus sporting and cultural events, discounted airfare, a free landline telephone, and refund of your 12% IVA (VAT) tax.
    Actually, I have Non-resident O, multiple entry, one year based on marriage to a Thai national. No need for proof of funds unless I apply for an extension. Since I take a trip every year back to the States to check up on my 94 year old mother along with visiting with my kids and friends, I just apply for a new visa from the Consulate in Los Angeles.
    Last edited by rickschoppers; 24-05-2015 at 10:50 AM.

  3. #28
    I'm in Jail

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    OK so if money was not an issue I would stay in my "club house" next to my official dwelling just so I could keep the peace with my better half. I do make some noise sometimes so she likes me there for those "off" days. But the taxes insurance health care ect may drive us away some day. I've got to see those other places and actually stay awhile to have any Idea of what it's like.

    Only hope is I should live that long but for now there is no place like home. And no I don't live in Kansas. Do you? And if so is it boring and flat land. And then why was Judy Garland taking drugs? Mabey she would have been better off in Costa Rica.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Passing Through View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    That list seems pretty unlikely to me. Turkmenistan has a better quality of life that the UK? Turkmenistan is a poverty-stricken hell-hole ruled by thugs and maniacs.
    Quite. Saudi Arabia seems to be a better place to live than most of Europe. Israel is also suspiciously high up the rankings. Perhaps they neglected to add the risk of having your hands chopped off or a 1000 lb bomb dropped on your house to the algorithms they use to calculate this.
    I would have to disagree about Saudi Arabia being a good place to live. Having lived there a few years, I would choose anywhere in Europe over that hot, desolate sand box.

  5. #30
    On a walkabout
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    If I am financially able too (enough money to keep clear of government rules and maintain a low profile) it would have to be Australia on the Queensland North Coast with a sea view.

    Still the best country in the world by miles.

  6. #31
    Harbinger of Doom

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    Australia on the Queensland North Coast with a sea view...Still the best country in the world by miles.
    I think I'd rather retire to a village on the Ukrainian front-line.

    If money were no object, I might move to France.

  7. #32
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    I thought this thread was about relocating or retiring on your current finanacial or individual retirement.

    If money was no object, I would relocate to a 120 foot yacht based out of Monte Carlo and travel the world.

  8. #33
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    Cyprus, Malta, Crete or Portugal are perhaps the best places to consider retirement for Brits with their kindly climates, facilities, proximity to home and easy pace unbothered by indigenous morons.

    Unfortunately, for those of us with Thai wingmen they are not necessarily the best options given the hot, omnipresent sun and absence of spicy,smelly things to eat.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers
    Actually, I have Non-resident O, multiple entry, one year based on marriage to a Thai national. No need for proof of funds unless I apply for an extension. Since I take a trip every year back to the States to check u mon my 94 year old mother along with visiting with my kids and friends, I just apply for a new visa from the Consulate in Los Angeles.
    Cheers to your mom!

  10. #35
    or TizYou?
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Passing Through View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by DrB0b View Post
    That list seems pretty unlikely to me. Turkmenistan has a better quality of life that the UK? Turkmenistan is a poverty-stricken hell-hole ruled by thugs and maniacs.
    Quite. Saudi Arabia seems to be a better place to live than most of Europe. Israel is also suspiciously high up the rankings. Perhaps they neglected to add the risk of having your hands chopped off or a 1000 lb bomb dropped on your house to the algorithms they use to calculate this.
    I would have to disagree about Saudi Arabia being a good place to live. Having lived there a few years, I would choose anywhere in Europe over that hot, desolate sand box.
    Depends whereabouts in KSA and your attitude.
    I had a great time living in Jeddah for 8 years and know lots of people that have enjoyed living there many more years than that.

  11. #36
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    Most Jeddah expats would probably know of the Bakers.

    Comment at the bottom of the article by their son.
    They just love Jeddah, and so do I. What I wouldn't do for a Broast and to be diving at 'Silver Sands' right now.

    ls01 | LifeStyle | Saudi Gazette

    After working in Jeddah for 29 years, Clem Baker and his wife, Trisha, retired back to England in 2006. However, unlike the majority of Westerners who leave with their “Exit Only” visas, the Bakers return to Saudi Arabia twice a year for holidays. The Bakers, who come from Northumberland in the north of England, first came to Jeddah in 1977. When I asked Clem what brought them to Saudi Arabia his answer was a single word: “Money!” At first he came out without his wife and two sons, but on their first holiday visit, they all fell in love with Jeddah and moved out here. After a two -year contract installing telephone exchanges, Clem was employed by Saudia in the communications department. In between the change of jobs, Clem wanted to take his car back to the UK. He asked some of his colleagues the best way to drive back. “It’s easy,” they told him, “you just drive straight up the Medina Road, and keep going!” And that is exactly what he did. What he didn’t realize was that at the Saudi border, his number plates would be removed. He wrote the numbers on two pieces of cardboard and put them in the windows and drove all the way through Jordan, Syria, Turkey and Europe like that, with no problems at any borders. “In fact,” he said, “at the border with Yugoslavia, I got gas coupons because they were trying to encourage tourism there.” The family returned a short while after that and moved into the Sharbatly Compound. In those days, Saudia City was still under construction. Clem remembers the first time he came into the compound area: “We were driving past Saudia City and there was a sign saying “House Sale”. We came into the South West area of the compound and went into this house and bought about twenty LP records, mostly Country & Western from some American that was here. There was a water cooler on the table and it had a price tag on it and the woman of the house was selling glasses of water for SR.2 to people who were coming to their house sale!” By 1982, Saudia City was complete and along with all the other expatriate airline staff, they moved into the new compound. “In those days, there was no wall around Saudia City and the road that is now Malek Road was just a hard packed dirt road. We used to drive straight across the desert to the creek. We would just park the car on the side of the creek somewhere, because there were no buildings in those days, and stay all day.” Clem remembers that 25 years ago, only the basics were available in the shops. “We would come back from the UK with our cases full of everything we needed. Now, for the last 10 years, it has been the opposite way around – we come here with empty cases and fill them up to take home. Things are a lot cheaper here than in the UK, especially with the riyal exchange rate. Food is much cheaper; fruits and things like schwarmas, and broast. A schwarma in the UK costs you about SR.20 and here it is only SR.3, and gasoline is very cheap – but unfortunately we can’t take those things with us!” In the past, communications were also very different. “There used to be an international telephone exchange at Bab Makkah and they had kiosks with queues and queues of people because you could only make calls through the operator; you didn’t have international access from your home phone and you had to book your call. Not many people even had phones in their homes. It was very difficult even for a business to get a phone. We had no TV and the highlight of a week on some compounds used to be renting a projector and a film from Downtown and organizing a film night. There weren’t any public cinemas, but the compounds had virtually public cinemas.” He recounted another favourite memory: “There was a big rainstorm in 1978 or ’79. I was working afternoon shift in Bab Makkah and one afternoon, the sky went black as though it was night time. I went to the school to collect our children and at first I thought someone was throwing stones at me – but it was hail stones, BIG hail stones. On my way back, the water started to build up at Kilo 6 and after I got through Bab Makkah, I had to roll my trousers up because the water was inside the car. Other cars had stopped and people were sitting on top of them. There wasn’t much drainage in those days and along the pavements in Bab Makkah there were a lot of man holes without covers where they were putting in cables and so forth and I saw a man walking up to his knees in water with his thobe pulled up. All of a sudden, he completely disappeared. I stopped and waited until I saw him come up again, so he survived it. Then I got into work and one of my Tunisian colleagues was sitting there with all his clothes over the back of his chair drying out because he had done the same thing!” Clem has also taken advantage of the improved medical facilities in the Kingdom to have laser surgery on his eyes. A few of his old working colleagues told him that they had had the procedure done and when he asked how much they had paid for it, he was surprised to find that it was about a quarter of the price quoted in the UK. If there had been an opportunity to buy a home and retire here, Clem was emphatic that that they would have done this. They come back here every six months, usually for 1 – 2 months, sponsored by Saudi family friends. “When we visit Saudia City, we get a great reception. It’s not just good to be back here – it’s great! We would love to bring friends out to visit but it is too difficult. They would love to dive here. It is a great shame that they don’t allow tourists to come. If they opened their doors, there would be a great market here, especially the diving.” During their years in Jeddah, a lot has obviously changed. “But,” he said, “the changes have all been for the better. What I do miss are the gatherings of the expats that they used to have – now they are very limited compared to 20 years ago. In the old days there was also a theatre that we used in about 1978, quite close to Balad, near the Lagoon. A building there was a proper theatre and we had a Pantomime there. I would also like to think that the Government will take care of the old buildings in Balad and keep them up to scratch rather than let them fall to pieces, which seems to be happening. I went there recently and there are some that are just dropping. They could have them looking nice. I would like to see them try to preserve more of their heritage.” During their years in Jeddah, Trisha worked at the Continental School as a swimming teacher. After so many years abroad, neither of them settled well in the UK when they retired. They missed the weather, their friends, the life style and the beach. They had a lot of Saudi friends and most of Clem’s work colleagues were by then Saudis and not expatriates. “Once we left on an Exit-Only visa, we wanted to come back because we have lived more than half our lives here. We consider that Saudi Arabia is home. When we flew out this time, as we circled over Jeddah to come in to land, Trisha said: “We are home again.’”
    Last edited by TizMe; 24-05-2015 at 10:58 AM.

  12. #37
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    ^^
    Yes, I had a good time as well, but still do not think it is a great place to live compared to Europe. Ok for the short term, if you are working, but not for long term retirement, unless you are a royal prince.

  13. #38
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    Yes, I will agree Jeddah is probably the best city to work or vacation in Saudi Arabia and is much different than Riyadh. It is much more cosmopolitan in every way from Riyadh. Diving in the Red Sea is in the top 5, but again it would get old over time. "Nice place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there", comes to mind.

    Just my opinion, and if you disagree, that is your right.

  14. #39
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    Turkey is a fine place to retire but I don't think they permit a residence beyond 20 years.
    Some of the finest archaeological sites in the world, superb beaches, great sailing and the food is satisfying if one can live without pork sausages and bacon. Istanbul is one of the world's great cities and the Aegean coastline affords a touring route second to none in the Med.Skiing in winter and traversing the Anatolian plain an experience if you fancy it.

  15. #40
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    I don't want to bother talking about the USA on this thread so this video says enough. Very clever lyrics and a damn good song, if you listen with headphones and like Neue Deutsche Härte (dance metal).

    Last edited by Sumbitch; 24-05-2015 at 12:42 PM.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by patsycat View Post
    Sorry, i forgot the apostrophe. Husband's. One husband. Never any other husbands. one was enough






    And probably most men think the same about me!!! One wife. or even no wife.

    Hey, i got good life insurance when he died. Now, it is coming up to when he should have been 65. And as his next of kin i may get a few pennies. And i shall take them, with pleasure. The man was a bastard. One time during a family argument he even went in to hit my mother... I have no respect for people like that and if i can get even 100 swiss francs i shall be happy. Nobody touches my mother, apart from hugs and kisses.

    The shock on her face was so upsetting.

    Patsy, I'm so happy you are rid of him. He was lower than DIRT to ever strike ANY woman.
    Eliminator
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  17. #42
    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    Yes, I will agree Jeddah is probably the best city to work or vacation in Saudi Arabia and is much different than Riyadh. It is much more cosmopolitan in every way from Riyadh. Diving in the Red Sea is in the top 5, but again it would get old over time. "Nice place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there", comes to mind.

    Just my opinion, and if you disagree, that is your right.
    From two years of bitter experience, Dhahran is the pits.

  18. #43
    Banned

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    Any Islamic country is obviously not an option being automatically a shithole. THE place for retirement has to be NZ, clean, not overpopulated, stunning scenery and nice climate. The only two negatives are the crappy internet and the moaning Maori. Those aside there are few better places and lovely people, apart from the fat horrible mongrels of course.

  19. #44
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    Mid Pyrenees, France...French/Spanish border.....


  20. #45
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    Nice Kev has got me thinking ^
    I'm proud of my 38" waist , also proud I have never done drugs

  21. #46
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    Retirement is more a state of mind versus where is the best location IMHO. You could be a miserable person thus nowhere would be suitable.

    Mine is Thailand and plan B (in the event it should go belly up) is back to the states but nowhere near the west coast.

  22. #47
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    I am going to retire to Isaan to retire, quite soon. I may have to retyre our cousin's car as last time I used it I had to pay for new wheel bearings and brakes. Then, I am going to buy a truck for myself. Then the missus buys a house and I buy a generator and bollocks to the UK ! I will live, die and go up a chimney.

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly94
    Any Islamic country is obviously not an option being automatically a shithole
    I will retire to Dar al-Tawhid where I will give bay'at to Abu Bakr Al-Quraishi, Amir al Mu'minim, and perform Dua in Khorasan so that my children may take ghanima in Dar al-Harb, and only Al-Mutakabbir Al-`Alim knows the future and protects the righteous.
    Last edited by DrB0b; 25-05-2015 at 01:37 AM.

  24. #49
    Thailand Expat KEVIN2008's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KEVIN2008 View Post
    Mid Pyrenees, France...French/Spanish border.....

    Here is a more recent pic...


  25. #50
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    la la la la all la lall la la
    I'm proud of my 38" waist , also proud I have never done drugs

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