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  1. #1
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    Do you really know what your eating.

    As we are told Organic foods are the best/safest to eat, though the cost of such foods are usually to expensive for the majority and the supply chain couldn't cope with the demand.

    Here's a couple of articles to explain what is in the food chain these days, over the years since the 1930s the multi national companies have tried various growth hormones, some have been banned and in my own opinion govts nowadays, choose to ignore the possible implications of such.

    KEEP HORMONES AND ANTIBIOTICS OFF THE MENU


    Meat may seem to be a fundamentally natural product, but the beef, pork, chicken, turkey, and more that graces our tables typically comes from animals treated with hormones and other unappetizing substances.

    Currently, six different steroidal hormones are approved by the FDA for use in “food animals.” These are the natural hormones estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, and the synthetic hormones trenbolone acetate, progestin melengestrol acetate, and zeranol, all of which make animals grow faster and/or produce leaner meat for food. Dairy cattle are often treated with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) to increase milk production. Hormones are banned for use in poultry in the U.S. (but that doesn’t stop chicken producers from marketing their birds as hormone-free!).

    Antibiotics are also routinely administered to animals raised for food. In some cases, these antibiotics protect animals from the unsanitary living conditions found in industrial feedlots. In other cases, these antibiotics can encourage weight gain or counter the effects of other treatments. Dairy cows given rBGH, for example, sometimes develop udder infections that then require antibiotic treatments.

    An astonishing 80 percent of all antibiotics sold in the U.S. are used on livestock. Let that sink in. This rampant use is creating antibiotic-resistant “super bacteria.” According to the Environmental Working Group, 87 percent of tested meat samples (turkey, pork, beef, and chicken) were contaminated by at least one species of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Doesn’t exactly make you hungry.

    Beyond hormones and antibiotics, other drugs are given to animals to enhance growth rates and meat quality. The drug ractopamine, for example, is fed to pigs, turkeys, and cattle to make them produce larger quantities of leaner meat with less feed. Ractopamine is not approved for human use, but because it’s added to feed in the weeks immediately prior to slaughter, traces of the drug remain in meat from treated animals.

    Is your food free of antibiotics or growth hormones? The best way to ensure your meat is free of drugs, hormones, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria is to buy organic meat varieties, which by law cannot come from treated animals. Local farms with pastured animals may also be a safer meat source. Talk to your nearby producers to find out what treatments they administer or feed to animals farmed for meat. Farms that don’t use any tend to be well worth whatever premium they may charge for their products.

  2. #2
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    AVOID SYNTHETIC HORMONES IN FOOD


    Hormones are responsible for much more than just acne in teenagers and mood swings in pregnant women. They are the messengers for much of your body’s functioning, including growth and development, immune response, regulation of metabolism, and reproduction among other things.

    The body creates its own hormones to take care of these vital duties, but many synthetic chemicals also mimic hormones. Some are intentionally developed to do so, like birth control pills or recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) and others accidentally disrupt hormones, like bisphenol-A and phthalates.

    And, whether natural or synthetic, hormones are powerful. It only takes a miniscule amount to cause big changes. That’s why understanding hormones is extremely important.

    The Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy has a Smart Guide that addresses the issue of hormones in the food system. And, there are a lot more than you were probably aware of, including:

    - Hormone growth promoters given to food animals
    – Hormone-active pesticides sprayed on food crops
    – Hormone plastic additives cans and other food packaging
    – Hormone disruptors that build up in the food chain (like brominated flame retardants)

    Plenty of uncertainties still remain about the impacts associated with these substances, but preliminary studies paint a disturbing picture.

    According to the Guide: “[E]ver-strengthening science links exposure to many individual hormone disruptors—pesticides, Teflon chemicals, plasticizers and food contaminants—with these common or rising chronic conditions, including:

    – Breast and prostate cancer
    – Thyroid disease
    – Obesity and diabetes
    – Endometriosis, uterine fibroids and infertility
    – Immune-related disease, such as asthma or allergies

    Increasingly, exposure in the womb to these same chemicals is implicated in serious problems found in newborns such as birth defects and low birth weight, as well as reduced odds of having a boy child. A recent study links a mother’s high beef consumption while pregnant (steroid growth promoter use is widespread in beef production) with lower sperm counts in her son.”

    While waiting for conclusive research, IATP advises consumers to take precautions and reduce exposure by following these steps:

    1. Eat low-fat meats and dairy products. Shop for dairy products labeled “rBGH-free,” which means they were produced without the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone.

    2. Eat “certified” organic when possible.

    3. Avoid pesticide hormones. Peel your fruits and vegetables, especially if they have been waxed, or wash them with a vegetable wash or diluted vinegar to remove surface pesticide residues.

    4. Use BPA-free cans and bottles.

    5. Demand that your elected officials support stronger efforts to keep synthetic hormones out of our food supply.

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    The Dangers of Farmed Fish

    Dangers of Farmed Fish You may have heard that eating fish is a healthy option. That’s a true statement, but in most cases today, it’s only a partially true statement. The reality of where our fish comes from is of paramount importance for our health! There is a vast different between wild caught fish and farmed fish.
    Fish farms produce supermarket protein with high concentrations of antibiotics, pesticides and lower levels of healthy nutrients. Research has found that farmed fish has less usable omega-3 fatty acids than wild-caught fish and a 20% lower protein content. A USDA review confirmed the findings. Farmed fish are fattier and have a high concentration of omega-6 fatty acids. Imbalances in the levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids create inflammation in the body.

    Dangers of Farmed Fish

    Farm-raised fish are given antibiotics to stave off disease that results from crowded conditions and are also treated with pesticides to combat sea lice. Sea lice from fish farms kill up to 95% of migrating juvenile wild salmon.

    The pesticides used to treat sea lice in fish farms circulate throughout the ocean. Pesticides that have been banned for decades have concentrated in the fat of much marine life.

    This fat is used in the feed that fish farms use, and studies by the Environmental Working Group, along with those done in Canada, Ireland and the UK, have found that cancer-causing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exist in farm-raised salmon at 16 times the rate of wild salmon.

    Dibutyltin is a chemical used in PVC plastics. Dibutyltin can interfere with normal immune responses and inflammation control in both animals and humans. A 2008 study found that dibutyltin may be contributing to the rise of allergies, asthma, obesity and other metabolic and immune disorders in humans.Scientists have found that dibutyltin in farm-raised mussels is more than 6 times higher than that of wild mussels.

    Researchers have also found levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE), a chemical used as a flame retardant, in high levels in farm-raised fish. PBDEs are endocrine disruptors that are thought to contribute to cancer. Scientists believe that both fish feed and increasing concentrations in the open oceans are contributing to high PBDE levels in fish and humans.

    Another study, conducted at the University of New York at Albany found that dioxin levels in farm-raised salmon are 11 times higher than those in wild salmon.

    Dioxins are one of the “dirty dozen,” says the World Health Organization (WHO) because they are highly toxic and are stored for a long time in the body: their half life in fat cells is 7 to 11 years.

    Dioxins impair the endocrine, immune, nervous and reproductive systems and are carcinogens.

    Canthaxanthin is a synthetic pigment that is used to add a pink color to farm-raised salmon. Wild salmon get their color naturally by feeding on krill. Canthaxanthin is a compound found in sunless tanning pills. Studies have found that canthaxanthin can affect pigments in the retina of the eye, leading to a ban of its use in the UK—but not the US.

    University of British Colombia professor Daniel Pauly calls aquafarms “floating pig farms” because tremendous amounts of fish feed and fish waste accumulate on the sea floor because of them, creating a perfect breeding ground for bacteria that threaten other marine life.

    Researchers from the George Mateljan Foundation say that “a good sized salmon farm produces an amount of excrement equivalent to the sewage of a city of 10,000 people.”

    Fish farms threaten other sea life in other ways too. Fish farms don’t really combat overfishing: they contribute to it. Salmon, for instance, are carnivores. It takes about 2 ½ to 4 pounds of other fish to create the salmon chow needed to produce 1 pound of farm-raised salmon. The overfishing of wild sardines, anchovies, mackerel, herring and other fish upset natural ecosystems. “We are not taking strain off wild fisheries,” says agricultural economist Rosamond L. Naylor. “We are adding to it. This cannot be sustained forever.”

    Another fear many scientists have is about dwindling biodiversity of fish. What makes the food supply more sustainable is the wide variety of fish and other species and their genetic make-ups. Diversity=survival.

    About 1 million farm-raised salmon have escaped from holes in nets from farms in the Puget Sound alone. Biologists fear that farm-fish escapees may out-compete wild fish for food and territory, contributing to the demise of many fish species.

    Interbreeding between escaped fish and wild may also dilute the wild salmon gene pool.

    Drugs that could reduce farmed-fish growing times have also begun to arise. These drugs alter genes in fish so that they produce growth hormones and grow six times faster than normal fish, increasing the danger that wild species will be overcome.

    Benefits of Wild Caught Fish

    This information is certainly sobering and should be enough to convince you to stay away from conventional farmed fish. These practices are even affecting the population of fish in the wild.

    That’s why I don’t recommend eating fish–even wild caught fish–on a daily basis. But the health benefits of certain wild caught fish like salmon just can’t be ignored.

    Wild caught salmon is very high in Omega 3 fatty acids. These fats are known as essential fatty acids. Our bodies don’t produce them, so must obtain them through our food. Wild caught salmon also has a healthy balance of Omega 3 to Omega 6 fatty acids. When you have too many Omega 6 fatty acids in your body, inflammation occurs.

    Cold water fish such as salmon are a good source of Vitamin D-an extremely important nutrient that is essential to wide variety of bodily functions. The sun is your best source of Vitamin D, but since most people don’t get enough sun in the winter months, wild caught salmon is a great way to add more of it into your diet.

    Also found in wild caught salmon are healthy protein, selenium, niacin, vitamin B12, phosphorus, magnesium and vitamin B6.

  4. #4
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    Meat may seem to be a fundamentally natural product, but the beef, pork, chicken, turkey, and more that graces our tables typically comes from animals treated with hormones and other unappetizing substances.

    well I don't eat any of that so it's just the shit they put on veg, who would trust 'organic' in Thailand, they probably think that just giving it a wash

  5. #5
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    Pesticide residues on some fruit and vegetables harming men's fertility, study claims

    Researchers found those men that ate fruit and vegetables high in concentrations of pesticide had on average a 49 per cent lower sperm count




    Pesticide residues on some fruits and vegetables could be harming men’s fertility, a study has claimed.

    Researchers found that men who consumed the most peppers, spinach, strawberries, apples and pears – which tend to contain the highest concentrations of pesticide – had on average a 49 per cent lower sperm count than those who ate the least.

    The study, carried out a fertility centre in Boston, Massachusetts, was small in scale, with only 155 men enrolled, and experts said it should not alarm men into cutting back on their fruit and veg consumption.

    However, it is the first to suggest that pesticides, some of which are known to affect the action of certain hormones, including the male sex hormone testosterone, could be affecting fertility through the traces found in the food we eat, and scientific commentators said it merited further research.

    Previous studies have shown that eating non-organic fruit and vegetables can lead to measurable levels of pesticides in urine. Research has also suggested a link between working closely with pesticides and lower sperm counts.

    The findings were based on 338 semen samples, along with information about the men’s diet collected via questionnaire. Information about which products were likely to have higher levels of pesticides was based on US Department of Agriculture advice. At no point were the actual pesticide levels on the fruits and vegetables consumed by the men measured.


    Men who ate 1.5 servings or more of the products rated high for pesticide residue had lower sperm counts and also lower proportions of healthy sperm.

    The results, which are published in the journal Human Reproduction, were adjusted to take into account factors that can lower sperm count such as smoking and weight.

    Allan Pacey, professor of andrology at the University of Sheffield, said: “This is a very interesting paper that raises the possibility that pesticide residues in our food may be a contributory factor in male infertility, at least in some men.

    “The idea has been raised before, but to my knowledge this is the first paper that has investigated this question in a systematic way. That said, whilst the results are tantalising, they should be interpreted with caution as the study is not without its flaws and limitations.”

    Jorge Chavarro, author of the study and assistant professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, said that the findings could be an argument in favour of eating more organic produce.

    “These findings should not discourage the consumption of fruit and vegetables in general,” he said. “in fact, we found that consuming more fruits and vegetables with low pesticide residues was beneficial. This suggests that implementing strategies specifically targeted at avoiding pesticide residues, such as consuming organically-grown produce or avoiding produce known to have large amounts of residues, may be the way to go.”

  6. #6
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    Funny how we all go apeshit over food additives. In todays world, there are additives in everything including meat, vegetables, milk, soda, sweets, water and virtually everything a human consumes. To really know the impact of all these additives is pretty much impossible unless someone only eats one food item, which just doesn't happen. Bottom line is we can not pick and choose what is good for us and what is not.

    Something more tangible is food handling. If you buy food from a street vendor, chances are it will cause you some distress. Even food in a nice restaurant can cause problems if it is not "handled" correctly. Eating food that has not been allowed to grow bacteria is extremely important to ones health. Probably the best way to make sure food is clean, is to wash and cook it yourself.

    Humans can eat some pretty bad food and have no problems at all. Just take a look around the countryside here where they eat lizards, insects, roots and berrys along with numerous plants grown in the wild. Also, walking through any open market will give one an idea of local meat handling. Are all the Thais dieing from food poisoning? No.

    My point is that if you want to scare yourself, read all the articles like those in this thread. Will all of us die from tainted food or additives? Don't think so. Common sense can keep a person healthier than trying to eat a purely organic diet. Enjoy life and partake in some of the great Thai dishes and season to your own particular taste. Eat what your body tells you to eat and quit worrying about food additives because it will do nothing other than give you high blood pressure.

    Enjoy life as if it were your last is my motto and screw all the doomsday BS.

  7. #7
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    In 2011, more than 34 million cattle and 850,000 calves were slaughtered to provide beef for US consumers. FAn estimated 80 percent of all US feedlot cattle are injected with hormones to make them grow faster, Fand one government study from 2007 estimated that approximately 17 percent of all cows in the US were given the genetically engineered growth hormone rBGH G to increase milk production. FThis means higher profits for the beef and dairy industries - but at what cost? Although the USDA and FDA claim these hormones are safe, there is growing concern that hormone residues in meat and milk are harmful to human health, animal health, and the environment.

    Hormones in Beef
    According to the European Union’s Scientific Committee on Veterinary Measures Relating to Public Health (SCVPH), the use of six natural and artificial growth hormones in beef production pose a potential risk to human health. FThese six hormones include three that are naturally occurring – Oestradiol, Progesterone and Testosterone – and three that are synthetic – Zeranol, Trenbolone, and Melengestrol. When hormones are injected into cattle, some naturally occurring hormone levels increase 7 to 20 times. F The committee found that “no acceptable daily intake could be established for any of these hormones.” F

    The Committee also questioned whether hormone residues in the meat of growth enhanced animals can disrupt human hormone balance, causing developmental problems, interfering with the reproductive system, and even leading to the development of breast, prostate and colon cancers. F

    Children, pregnant women, and developing embryos are thought to be most susceptible to negative health effects from added hormones. For example, hormone residues in beef have been examined as a cause of lower sperm counts in boys. FThe use of rBGH in dairy cows was linked in one study to increases in human twin and triplet births. F

    Environmental Impact
    Growth-promoting hormones not only remain in the meat we consume, but also pass through the cattle to be excreted in manure. Scientists are increasingly concerned about the environmental impacts of this hormone residue as it leaks from manure into the environment, contaminating soil, and surface and groundwater. FAquatic ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to hormone residues. Recent studies have demonstrated that exposure to hormones has a substantial effect on the gender and reproductive capacity of fish. F

    Despite international scientific concern, the United States, backed by the World Trade Organization, Fcontinue to allow growth-promoting hormones in cattle. F The European Union does not allow the use of hormones in cattle production, has prohibited the import of hormone-treated beef since 1988, and has banned all imports of US beef treated with hormones. FThe ban has been challenged by the US at the World Trade Organization and debate still rages between the US and the EU over its validity. F

    Hormones in Milk and Dairy Products
    Industrial farms G use a number of methods to increase milk production in dairy cows, including selective breeding, feeding grain-based diets (instead of grass), and exposing cows to longer periods of artificial light. One of the most common and controversial ways to force greater milk production is with injection of rBGH (recombinant bovine growth hormone), a genetically engineered artificial growth hormone.

    Developed and manufactured under the brand name Posilac® by the Monsanto Corporation, rBGH was approved by the FDA in 1993, despite strong opposition from scientists, farmers, and consumers. In August 2008, Monsanto sold their Posilac division to Eli Lilly and Company for $300 million.

    According to critics, rBGH has never been properly tested. The FDA relied solely on one study performed by Monsanto in which rBGH was tested for 90 days on 30 rats. The study was never published, and the FDA stated that the results showed no significant problems. A review of rBGH by Health Canada found the 90-day study showed a significant number of issues that should have triggered a full review by the FDA. F

  8. #8
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    Rick you mention insects etc, they are now promoting these foods as the new food of the century, that is healthy.

    Reading threads like this makes people more aware of just whats going on.

    If i remember correctly your a chemist ye,enough said.

    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    Funny how we all go apeshit over food additives. In todays world, there are additives in everything including meat, vegetables, milk, soda, sweets, water and virtually everything a human consumes. To really know the impact of all these additives is pretty much impossible unless someone only eats one food item, which just doesn't happen. Bottom line is we can not pick and choose what is good for us and what is not.

    Something more tangible is food handling. If you buy food from a street vendor, chances are it will cause you some distress. Even food in a nice restaurant can cause problems if it is not "handled" correctly. Eating food that has not been allowed to grow bacteria is extremely important to ones health. Probably the best way to make sure food is clean, is to wash and cook it yourself.

    Humans can eat some pretty bad food and have no problems at all. Just take a look around the countryside here where they eat lizards, insects, roots and berrys along with numerous plants grown in the wild. Also, walking through any open market will give one an idea of local meat handling. Are all the Thais dieing from food poisoning? No.

    My point is that if you want to scare yourself, read all the articles like those in this thread. Will all of us die from tainted food or additives? Don't think so. Common sense can keep a person healthier than trying to eat a purely organic diet. Enjoy life and partake in some of the great Thai dishes and season to your own particular taste. Eat what your body tells you to eat and quit worrying about food additives because it will do nothing other than give you high blood pressure.

    Enjoy life as if it were your last is my motto and screw all the doomsday BS.

  9. #9
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    Just trying to liven up your thread Horatio since it is fairly dark.

    In the end, each to their own when it comes to diet.

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    Rick wouldn't say its dark more enlightening as to how these companies such as Monsanto put profit before safety.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Horatio Hornblower View Post
    Pesticide residues on some fruit and vegetables harming men's fertility, study claims

    Researchers found those men that ate fruit and vegetables high in concentrations of pesticide had on average a 49 per cent lower sperm count


    That's a positive then

  12. #12
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    We're all eating monsanto shit. Bright glowing nuclear shit.

    Greed before people - Profit before life.

    "A virus with shoes"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dapper View Post
    We're all eating monsanto shit. Bright glowing nuclear shit.

    Greed before people - Profit before life.

    "A virus with shoes"
    We will once Monsanto have killed off the rest of the bees, we'll have no choice but to eat their gm shite.

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    and as cancer goes through the roof with 1 in 3 likely to get it.
    wonder if it affects my Guinness.

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    It's great to see more people realizing what the meat industry is really like. I've been vegetarian for 39 years.

    Western people get a lot more colon cancer than Asians, as a direct result of eating so much more meat. Veggies have 40 % less cancer and 40 % less heart disease....which is huge.

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    Having worked for the Thai food and bevergae industry, what goes in food is shocking. What is more shocking is the shit that goes in western food!

    Ice cold coffee sir! Fukc that. Won't mention the name of course.

    The problem with Organic food in Thailand - this is not all orgnaic just to be clear - is the lack of regulation. Many organic products here go through single batch testing. This means a produce just has to pass a single batch for the purpose of testing to recieve the organic stamp. The product you buy on th shelf may not be organic. The only place I have found personally to be reliable in their tests is lemon farm. Or at least the organic products they sell. If we are talking about veg. Tinned and baby products i have always bought US or Australian organic many who now tin their stuff with BPA free linings.
    You bullied, you laughed, you lied, you lost!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dapper View Post
    We're all eating monsanto shit. Bright glowing nuclear shit.

    Greed before people - Profit before life.

    "A virus with shoes"
    The end is near for those who submit to them...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    It's great to see more people realizing what the meat industry is really like. I've been vegetarian for 39 years.

    Western people get a lot more colon cancer than Asians, as a direct result of eating so much more meat. Veggies have 40 % less cancer and 40 % less heart disease....which is huge.
    43 years for me, mum and sisters all got colon cancer.

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    Do you really know what your eating.
    Nope

    But I do know what not to eat

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragonfly94 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    I've been vegetarian for 39 years.
    43 years for me, mum and sisters all got colon cancer.
    Do you have regular colonoscopies ? Every 5 years ?
    Colon cancer is probably the most preventable cancer. The polyps in your colon take up to 10 years to turn cancerous.

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    Quote Originally Posted by billy the kid View Post
    and as cancer goes through the roof with 1 in 3 likely to get it.
    wonder if it affects my Guinness.
    it does in the sense that about 1in20 of those cancers you are referring to are going to because by drinking that Guinness along with alcohol based drinks, making guinness somewhat more risky that most of the other stuff this thread banging on about.

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    Gotta die of something.

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