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Thread: Brits Abroad

  1. #26
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    BM well there teeth are at least there own, not Prosthetic.

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    Does Oz offer the same welfare benefits as the UK?

    Most UK immigrants that come to the USA watched to many Rocky movies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltnt View Post
    Does Oz offer the same welfare benefits as the UK?

    Most UK immigrants that come to the USA watched to many Rocky movies.
    They can't get into NFL Football either...
    A Deplorable Bitter Clinger

  4. #29
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    BM you may find they watch real men's games,without all the armour for protection.

  5. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boon Mee
    They can't get into NFL Football either
    Perhaps its the pay scale they're after? The one's I've met or worked with in the USA seem really happy to be there. Of course they all go home once a year or bring their parents over for a visit...most seem to acclimatise well and generally are well liked within their organizations.

    Most that I had a personal relationship with, (meaning daily discussion and some out of work drinking), always had a plan to return to Blighty in the end.

    Many use Canada as their port of entry to the USA...work there for a while until they can finagle a job in the States. One thing about the Brits, they know how to work the immigration ropes.

    If I were in the States now, I'd be looking to exit via Mexico then onward to S.A., cheaper, more wide open and out of control which for me is a positive.

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    ^^People are too scared to move to a country where they don't speak English.
    This might be the case regarding English-speaking folks in particular.

    Moreover, akin to a twisted neo-colonial movement.


  7. #32
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    No doubt many UK residents are not currently staying in their homeland, for obvious reasons. I would, however, think all the numbers posted are inaccurate unless these UK residents gave up their citizenship. How else are UK citizens able to reside permanently in other countries?

    I would think there are many countries in the world that a UK citizen can live long term, but how many of those give up their original citizenship? How are these numbers obtained? It appears to me that no accurate statistics can be obtained to give a clear answer.

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horatio Hornblower View Post
    BM you may find they watch real men's games,without all the armour for protection.
    Kickball...
    A Deplorable Bitter Clinger

  9. #34
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    They obtain residency not citizenship.


    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    No doubt many UK residents are not currently staying in their homeland, for obvious reasons. I would, however, think all the numbers posted are inaccurate unless these UK residents gave up their citizenship. How else are UK citizens able to reside permanently in other countries?

    I would think there are many countries in the world that a UK citizen can live long term, but how many of those give up their original citizenship? How are these numbers obtained? It appears to me that no accurate statistics can be obtained to give a clear answer.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by terry57 View Post
    ^ ^

    I don't mind the Asians coming into Australia simply because the woman are usually smoking fookin hot.

    On the other Hand those fat horrible Pommy slappers certainly are not.
    Oi! That's no way to talk about your mother/grannie/great-grannie.

    Anyway, if it is right the UK is so unattractive to antipodeans why in that case are there over 110,000 of the buggers living there?

    Needless to say, they're all mostly white and very few are slopes or bongs.

    Most are in the professions and live around the south-east and London because Australia is so fucking dull, culture-less and parochial they crave an environment where they can develop and grow as human beings as opposed to remaining in Oz where they'll simply fester in intellectual starvation, drear mediocrity and suburban tedium so favoured by the blue collar class Brits who migrate there.

    Good onya cobbler, innit.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horatio Hornblower View Post
    They obtain residency not citizenship.


    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    No doubt many UK residents are not currently staying in their homeland, for obvious reasons. I would, however, think all the numbers posted are inaccurate unless these UK residents gave up their citizenship. How else are UK citizens able to reside permanently in other countries?

    I would think there are many countries in the world that a UK citizen can live long term, but how many of those give up their original citizenship? How are these numbers obtained? It appears to me that no accurate statistics can be obtained to give a clear answer.
    Whatever. How are the statistics obtained, and are they accurate was the question.

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by thaimeme View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Pragmatic View Post
    ^^People are too scared to move to a country where they don't speak English.
    This might be the case regarding English-speaking folks in particular.

    Moreover, akin to a twisted neo-colonial movement.

    Well, you seem to have managed Jeff and you can't utter a single sentence in intelligible English.

    Har,har.

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    No doubt many UK residents are not currently staying in their homeland, for obvious reasons. I would, however, think all the numbers posted are inaccurate unless these UK residents gave up their citizenship. How else are UK citizens able to reside permanently in other countries?

    I would think there are many countries in the world that a UK citizen can live long term, but how many of those give up their original citizenship? How are these numbers obtained? It appears to me that no accurate statistics can be obtained to give a clear answer.
    Very few countries require migrants to renounce their birth citizenship as a requirement for their new citizenship.

    Migration figures such these in the OP are estimates and do not reflect those who return or who are simply working overseas and have no intention of settling abroad permanently.

  14. #39
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    How are the statistics obtained, and are they accurate was the question
    You could try following the link in the OP.

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    OK, in the case of dual citizenship, which country counts that individual as their citizen, or do both countries count them?

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Passing Through View Post
    How are the statistics obtained, and are they accurate was the question
    You could try following the link in the OP.
    The IPPR is a very large organization and difficult to find details at that level on their website. I would rather not take the time to look it up and hoped there was a statistic expert in the crowd. I guess we can all just accept the numbers as accurate?

  17. #42
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    Try reading the link.

    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Horatio Hornblower View Post
    They obtain residency not citizenship.


    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers View Post
    No doubt many UK residents are not currently staying in their homeland, for obvious reasons. I would, however, think all the numbers posted are inaccurate unless these UK residents gave up their citizenship. How else are UK citizens able to reside permanently in other countries?

    I would think there are many countries in the world that a UK citizen can live long term, but how many of those give up their original citizenship? How are these numbers obtained? It appears to me that no accurate statistics can be obtained to give a clear answer.
    Whatever. How are the statistics obtained, and are they accurate was the question.

  18. #43
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    I read the link, but no mention of dual citizenship. I also clicked on the IPPR link, but too large to spend time on. Did you look at the IPPR link?

  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickschoppers
    How are the statistics obtained, and are they accurate was the question.
    May be they go by when a person has exited the UK for 183 he/she ceases to be a UK resident?

  20. #45
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    I read the link, but no mention of details on how the staristics were obtained or dual citizenship. I also clicked on the IPPR link, but too large to spend time on. Did you look at the IPPR link?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boon Mee View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Horatio Hornblower View Post
    BM you may find they watch real men's games,without all the armour for protection.
    Kickball...
    I believe the long-running fashion is lawn bowls [bowls].


  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by terry57 View Post

    What is up with those chip eating, non soap using bastards. ?
    I often ask the same question about the antipodean
    Quote Originally Posted by terry57 View Post
    chip eating, non soap using bastards
    who pollute the west of London in their thousands.

    The drunken, piss-stained ballbags.

  23. #48
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    I read the link
    Not very carefully, it seems. Immediately under the table there's a link labelled Q & A: Data which points to BBC NEWS | UK | Brits Abroad FAQs: The data If you're still worried about this you can read http://votes-for-expat-brits.com/doc...xtforprint.pdf which has a bit more detail. And if that doesn't satisfy you, you could also take the radical step of using Google to track down a copy of the original paper from which the (now decade old) BBC report is drawn.

    no mention of dual citizenship
    Perhaps that's because it's not particularly relevant.

  24. #49
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    The Aussies need the Brits to be shop stewards and middle managers because the Aussies don't give a XXXX for those professions.

  25. #50
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    Great catch. Thanks for that. I have cut and pasted part of the details, but it appears the data is not very accurate, which is what I originally thought. A survey conducted in 2006 is not current and they admit many countries use inaccuarate numbers. I am not trying to dicredit that many UK citizens reside abroad, but only that the data used by the OP is inaccurate. No offense KW.



    WHERE HAVE THE FIGURES COME FROM?
    The figures for Britons living abroad are 2006 estimates drawn up by the IPPR to inform a report it is publishing into the phenomenon of "Brits abroad", which includes recommendations for British government policy.

    The researchers who calculated the figures developed different methods that draw on different statistical sources, each with incomplete coverage and varying degrees of reliability.

    For example, reliable country census data on the number of British-born or British nationals is available only for a small number of countries. Where figures exist, they are likely to be underestimates as they are out of date (national censuses are typically carried out at the beginning of the decade) and there could have been sizeable growth in the British population since.

    The only set of data that does cover every country in the world is the number of UK state pensioners who inform the Department for Work and Pensions that they are resident overseas.

    The number of passports issued over the past 10 years does cover most countries, but can be both an over- and under-estimate. On the one hand, replacements for lost and stolen passports could be issued overseas to tourists, but on the other hand, British expatriates may renew their passport when they are back in the UK where it is cheaper to do so.

    So, in order to calculate the number of Britons living permanently overseas in 2006, the IPPR developed the following methods:

    Where robust official data exists over time (census or annual population surveys), it has been adjusted in line with previous rates of growth or decline. In Spain, France and Portugal where there is evidence of high rates of non-registration or second-home buying, the official numbers of the British population around popular holiday destinations have been further increased
    Where accurate official data does exist but where trends cannot be calculated, an estimate has been calculated using the growth rate in the number of UK state pensioners in that country
    Where official data is absent, inaccurate or out of date and where UK state pensions data is too small or inappropriate, an estimate of the number of British passports issued during the last 10 years has been used
    Where the passports issuing rates are suspected to be anomalous or where absent, local consular estimates have been used instead.
    Also estimated were the number of British expatriates who live overseas for part of the year. Selected countries were categorised into four main groups (far-flung settlement countries, Mediterranean retirement countries, other European or work destinations, and far-flung tourist destinations) before the estimates of Britons living permanently overseas were multiplied by factors based on survey data and other evidence.

    Back to top

    WHAT FIGURES ARE AVAILABLE FOR EACH COUNTRY?
    Every country has a table showing a figure for the numbers of Britons who live there permanently (the "total") and a combined figure for permanent and part-time Britons ("inc. part-time").

    On the same table, some countries have a figure for the number of British pensioners and the gender breakdown of the British population there.

    A few countries have tables showing the age and/ or employment breakdown of their British populations.

    Back to top

    WHAT DOES "TOTAL" MEAN IN THE MAIN TABLE ?
    It means the estimated number of British nationals and/or people born in the UK believed to have lived there for a year or longer.
    Last edited by rickschoppers; 27-04-2015 at 07:39 PM.

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