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  1. #1
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    The Greatest Australian, sacked by the Pommy Bastards, RIP

    Free Health care downunder was thanks to Gough Whitlam
    Opposed by the reactionaries.

    Opposed to US tracking station at Pine Gap

    Gough Whitlam RIP,not since Curtin has Australia produced a world statesman.Abbot Gillard lathem Rudd all dwarves in cmparison in a antion reknowned mainly for white socked bowlers,rabid racists sporting rapists pissed pommy pickers and its abuse of immigrants and natives alike .

    Deposed in a coup by same khvntz who deposed wilson and run pedo masonic networks worldwide.

    He will be fondly remembered for the health service by tjose yet unburned when worms like fraser are erased from memory with the other ignominious rogues who prorogued Australian democracy and revealed the Windsor hegemony

    Farewell.
    I used to have a job at a calendar factory.
    I got the sack because
    I took a couple of days off.

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    For those not experienced in translating gibberish:

    Gough Whitlam, ex Australian PM has passed at age 98

    BBC News - Former Australian PM Gough Whitlam dies at 98

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    Quote Originally Posted by david44
    The Greatest Australian sacked by the Pommy Bastads
    You mean the Queen is a Pommy? I thought she was German!

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    Gough Whitlam was Prime Minister for less than three years.
    A giant in stature, intellect and presence, he reformed the Labor Party, led it out of the wilderness and irrevocably changed the Australian political agenda.
    He will also be widely and warmly remembered for his quick turn of phrase.
    Here are some of most famous lines.
    "Well may we say: 'God save the Queen', because nothing will save the Governor General."
    - Whitlam on the steps of parliament, November 11, 1975, the day of his dismissal.

    "The proclamation you have just heard was countersigned Malcolm Fraser, who will go down in history as Kerr's cur."
    - Whitlam on Malcolm Fraser, who brought about the downfall of the Whitlam government aided by then Governor General, Sir John Robert Kerr.

    "Punters know the horse named Morality rarely gets past the post, whereas the nag Self-Interest always runs a good race."
    - 1989, in London’s Daily Telegraph.

    "You can be sure of one thing, I shall treat Him as an equal."
    - Whitlam on his 80th birthday, on a possible future meeting with God.

    "Very satisfactory"
    - Whitlam’s description of his marriage to wife Margaret, on their 60th anniversary.

    "When Sir Winton Turnbull [representative of a large rural seat] was raving and ranting on the adjournment and shouted: "I am a Country member". I interjected 'I remember'. He could not understand why, for the first time in all the years he had been speaking in the House, there was instant and loud applause from both sides."
    - Debating the question ‘That Politicians Have Lost Their Sense Of Humour’, Sydney Town Hall, 24 May 2000.

    "Blimps like Bruce Ruxton bring the RSL into ridicule by claiming that all Australians have fought under the present flag."
    - November 1994, at the ALP national dinner in Melbourne

    "The tango might have suited me but that’s gone already to Paul Keating in the first CD of this series. He is more the rose between the teeth type, anyway. He used to manage a rock band but the greatest rock band is named after me."
    - 2003 speech to the Australian Institute of Music in an organised celebration of his life.

    "We are all diminished when any of us are denied proper education. The nation is the poorer – a poorer economy, a poorer civilisation, because of this human and national waste."
    - From Whitlam’s 1969 election policy speech.

    "I do not for a moment believe that we should set limits on what we can achieve together for our country, for our people, for our future."
    - From his 1972 ‘It’s Time’ election speech.

    "The man is a paranoiac, he's a fanatic, and he's a bigot. What makes it all the more nauseating is, of course, that Bjelke-Peterson is such a Bible-bashing bastard."
    - Speaking in 1974

    "Vincent Lingiari, I solemnly hand to you these deeds as proof, in Australian law, that these lands belong to the Gurindji people and I put into your hands this piece of the earth itself as a sign that we restore them to you and your children forever".
    - August 16, 1975, as he handed the Gurindji people at Wattie Creek in the Northern Territory title deeds to traditional lands.
    Last edited by Latindancer; 21-10-2014 at 12:14 PM.

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    The Australian flag is flying at half-mast over Parliament House and the day's sitting program has been replaced with condolence motions starting at noon with a tribute from Prime Minister Tony Abbott.
    "Gough Whitlam was a giant of his time," Mr Abbott said.
    "He united the Australian Labor Party, won two elections and seemed, in so many ways, larger than life.
    "In his own party, he inspired a legion of young people to get involved in public life."

    Opposition Leader Bill Shorten told a regular caucus meeting in Canberra the Labor Party had lost a legend.
    "Gough Whitlam redefined our country and in doing so he changed the lives of a generation," he said.
    "His vision, his ambition, offered Australia a new sense of what it might be.
    "Our country is different because of him."

    Mr Whitlam was the nation's 21st prime minister and he lived during the lifetimes of all 27 other Australian prime ministers.
    He established diplomatic relations with China and was the first Australian leader to visit the country.
    He was also a significant figure in achieving indigenous rights and promoting education.
    Mr Whitlam died in Sydney on Tuesday morning.

    "A loving and generous father, he was a source of inspiration to us and our families and for millions of Australians," his children Antony, Nicholas, Stephen and Catherine said in a statement.
    Mr Whitlam led Labor to its first victory in 23 years at the December 1972 election on the back of the famous "It's Time" campaign.
    He was sensationally sacked on November 11, 1975 by Governor-General Sir John Kerr.

    His wife Margaret died in March 2012.
    Former Liberal prime minister Malcolm Fraser, who succeeded Mr Whitlam, said he came to value their friendship in the years after the dismissal.
    "He was far too big a man to carry any bitterness or sadness in his heart," Mr Fraser said.
    "He certainly left an indelible mark on Australian history."

    Australian Greens leader Christine Milne said Mr Whitlam was a champion for the environment and his passion for social justice, education and the arts was legendary.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    For those not experienced in translating gibberish:

    Gough Whitlam, ex Australian PM has passed at age 98

    BBC News - Former Australian PM Gough Whitlam dies at 98
    thanks its patronising attitudes that steer many Australians towards a republic

    Of course slagging off others is easier than posting new material

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    You seem a tad grumpy David.
    The old "problem" playing up again?

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    March 17, 2014
    Share on facebook Share on twitter Share on google More Sharing Services 221



    How the Same Godfather Rules from Canberra to Kiev
    The Forgotten Coup

    by JOHN PILGER
    Washington’s role in the fascist putsch against an elected government in Ukraine will surprise only those who watch the news and ignore the historical record. Since 1945, dozens of governments, many of them democracies, have met a similar fate, usually with bloodshed.
    Nicaragua is one of the poorest countries on earth with fewer people than Wales, yet under the reformist Sandinistas in the 1980s it was regarded in Washington as a “strategic threat”. The logic was simple; if the weakest slipped the leash, setting an example, who else would try their luck?
    The great game of dominance offers no immunity for even the most loyal US “ally”. This is demonstrated by perhaps the least known of Washington’s coups — in Australia. The story of this forgotten coup is a salutary lesson for those governments that believe a “Ukraine” or a “Chile” could never happen to them.
    Australia’s deference to the United States makes Britain, by comparison, seem a renegade. During the American invasion of Vietnam — which Australia had pleaded to join — an official in Canberra voiced a rare complaint to Washington that the British knew more about US objectives in that war than its antipodean comrade-in-arms. The response was swift: “We have to keep the Brits informed to keep them happy. You are with us come what may.”
    This dictum was rudely set aside in 1972 with the election of the reformist Labor government of Gough Whitlam. Although not regarded as of the left, Whitlam — now in his 98th year — was a maverick social democrat of principle, pride, propriety and extraordinary political imagination. He believed that a foreign power should not control his country’s resources and dictate its economic and foreign policies. He proposed to “buy back the farm” and speak as a voice independent of London and Washington.
    On the day after his election, Whitlam ordered that his staff should not be “vetted or harassed” by the Australian security organisation, ASIO — then, as now, beholden to Anglo-American intelligence. When his ministers publicly condemned the Nixon/Kissinger administration as “corrupt and barbaric”, Frank Snepp, a CIA officer stationed in Saigon at the time, said later: “We were told the Australians might as well be regarded as North Vietnamese collaborators.”
    Whitlam demanded to know if and why the CIA was running a spy base at Pine Gap near Alice Springs, ostensibly a joint Australian/US “facility”. Pine Gap is a giant vacuum cleaner which, as the whistleblower Edward Snowden recently revealed, allows the US to spy on everyone. In the 1970s, most Australians had no idea that this secretive foreign enclave placed their country on the front line of a potential nuclear war with the Soviet Union. Whitlam clearly knew the personal risk he was taking — as the minutes of a meeting with the US ambassador demonstrate. “Try to screw us or bounce us,” he warned, “[and Pine Gap] will become a matter of contention”.
    Victor Marchetti, the CIA officer who had helped set up Pine Gap, later told me, “This threat to close Pine Gap caused apoplexy in the White House. Consequences were inevitable … a kind of Chile was set in motion.”
    The CIA had just helped General Pinochet to crush the democratic government of another reformer, Salvador Allende, in Chile.
    In 1974, the White House sent the Marshall Green to Canberra as ambassador. Green was an imperious, very senior and sinister figure in the State Department who worked in the shadows of America’s “deep state”. Known as the “coupmaster”, he had played a played a central role in the 1965 coup against President Sukarno in Indonesia — which cost up to a million lives. One of his first speeches in Australia was to the Australian Institute of Directors — described by an alarmed member of the audience as “an incitement to the country’s business leaders to rise against the government”.
    Pine Gap’s top-secret messages were de-coded in California by a CIA contractor, TRW. One of the de-coders was a young Christopher Boyce, an idealist who, troubled by the “deception and betrayal of an ally”, became a whistleblower. Boyce revealed that the CIA had infiltrated the Australian political and trade union elite and referred to the Governor-General of Australia, Sir John Kerr, as “our man Kerr”.
    In his black top hat and medal-laden mourning suit, Kerr was the embodiment of imperium. He was the Queen of England’s Australian viceroy in a country that still recognised her as head of state. His duties were ceremonial; yet Whitlam — who appointed him — was unaware of or chose to ignore Kerr’s longstanding ties to Anglo-American intelligence.
    The Governor-General was an enthusiastic member of the Australian Association for Cultural Freedom, described by the Jonathan Kwitny of the Wall Street Journal in his book, The Crimes of Patriots, as, “an elite, invitation-only group … exposed in Congress as being founded, funded and generally run by the CIA”. The CIA “paid for Kerr’s travel, built his prestige … Kerr continued to go to the CIA for money”.
    In 1975, Whitlam discovered that Britain’s MI6 had long been operating against his government. “The Brits were actually decoding secret messages coming into my foreign affairs office,” he said later. One of his ministers, Clyde Cameron, told me, “We knew MI6 was bugging Cabinet meetings for the Americans.” In interviews in the 1980s with the American investigative journalist Joseph Trento, executive officers of the CIA disclosed that the “Whitlam problem” had been discussed “with urgency” by the CIA’s director, William Colby, and the head of MI6, Sir Maurice Oldfield, and that “arrangements” were made. A deputy director of the CIA told Trento: “Kerr did what he was told to do.”
    In 1975, Whitlam learned of a secret list of CIA personnel in Australia held by the Permanent Head of the Australian Defence Department, Sir Arthur Tange — a deeply conservative mandarin with unprecedented territorial power in Canberra. Whitlam demanded to see the list. On it was the name, Richard Stallings who, under cover, had set up Pine Gap as a provocative CIA installation. Whitlam now had the proof he was looking for.
    On 10 November, 1975, he was shown a top secret telex message sent by ASIO in Washington. This was later sourced to Theodore Shackley, head of the CIA’s East Asia Division and one of the most notorious figures spawned by the Agency. Shackley had been head of the CIA’s Miami-based operation to assassinate Fidel Castro and Station Chief in Laos and Vietnam. He had recently worked on the “Allende problem”.
    Shackley’s message was read to Whitlam. Incredibly, it said that the prime minister of Australia was a security risk in his own country.
    The day before, Kerr had visited the headquarters of the Defence Signals Directorate, Australia’s NSA whose ties to Washington were, and reman binding. He was briefed on the “security crisis”. He had then asked for a secure line and spent 20 minutes in hushed conversation.
    On 11 November — the day Whitlam was to inform Parliament about the secret CIA presence in Australia — he was summoned by Kerr. Invoking archaic vice-regal “reserve powers”, Kerr sacked the democratically elected prime minister. The problem was solved.
    John Pilger’s new film, Utopia, about Australia, was released in Australia in January. www.johnpilger.com
    Heart of Gold and a Knob of butter.

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    ^ VEry good article.

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    ^ It took me by surprise but Pilger has a solid reputation for old school, sound and accurate journalism.

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    Whitlam could point to achievements and reforms such as recognising China, abolishing conscription, establishing Medibank, introducing needs-based school funding, extending tertiary education, reforming family law, boosting the arts, indexing pensions, and moving to equal pay for women, voting at 18, one vote-one value and Aboriginal land rights. He removed sales tax on contraceptives. He broke the cultural cringe, introduced an Australian honours system and a new national anthem, made relations with Asia a priority and ended Australia's involvement with imperialism, later revived in Iraq.

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    ^ He also gave us indoor dunnys.

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    “Well may we say, ‘God save the Queen’, because nothing will save the governor-general."

    bit of a lefty, but a true Aussie icon. RIP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer
    "Vincent Lingiari, I solemnly hand to you these deeds as proof, in Australian law, that these lands belong to the Gurindji people and I put into your hands this piece of the earth itself as a sign that we restore them to you and your children forever". - August 16, 1975, as he handed the Gurindji people at Wattie Creek in the Northern Territory title deeds to traditional lands.
    Great post LTdcr. Interesting this quote: Giving back what was theirs anyway? Perplexing...like American Indians on reservations...

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    Gough shows his sense of humour.



    RIP to the old fella.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltnt View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer
    "Vincent Lingiari, I solemnly hand to you these deeds as proof, in Australian law, that these lands belong to the Gurindji people and I put into your hands this piece of the earth itself as a sign that we restore them to you and your children forever". - August 16, 1975, as he handed the Gurindji people at Wattie Creek in the Northern Territory title deeds to traditional lands.
    Great post LTdcr. Interesting this quote: Giving back what was theirs anyway? Perplexing...like American Indians on reservations...

    At the time it wasn't theirs.
    They had rights to nothing.
    Very different from the US Indians situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Necron99
    At the time it wasn't theirs.
    How's dat?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltnt View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Necron99
    At the time it wasn't theirs.
    How's dat?
    At the time Australia was considered terra nullis when the fleet landed.
    Abo's had no legal claim to any land.

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    That's Terra nullius, old chap.

    Terra nullius - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui View Post
    ^ It took me by surprise but Pilger has a solid reputation for old school, sound and accurate journalism.
    So true...one of the very few independent journalist that hasn't sold out.
    And he tends to dwell into subject matter that are more than a little sensitive to the establishment.

    Articles, documentaries, and books are worth pursuing.

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    Apologies D44, IMHO Whitlam was a disaster for Australia, the worst prime minister
    post WW2, booted out of office for economic mismanagement.
    His record speaks for itself, that's why he got the boot and never got re elected.
    Any idiot can introduce new policies, but policies must be costed and economically viable.
    Whitlam introduced the 'don't think, just spend' mentality to the Labor Party that was
    again evident with the last Labour government, again booted out of office for economic mismanagement.
    He was an orator full of hot air with little or no substance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChookRaffle Jones View Post
    Apologies D44, IMHO Whitlam was a disaster for Australia, the worst prime minister
    post WW2, booted out of office for economic mismanagement.
    His record speaks for itself, that's why he got the boot and never got re elected.
    Any idiot can introduce new policies, but policies must be costed and economically viable.
    Whitlam introduced the 'don't think, just spend' mentality to the Labor Party that was
    again evident with the last Labour government, again booted out of office for economic mismanagement.
    He was an orator full of hot air with little or no substance.
    Of course you are entitled to your opinion but don't get the facts wrong Gough was re=elected in 74 ,Of course he couldn't do a 3rd term after Kerr sacked him,Australian PMs still vow loyalty to the GG and the battenburgs saxe coborg krauts.

    The lammington republic is just a smoko dream.

    As for economic mismanagement I'll believe when boat loads of houso unemployed drongos are turned back from Indonesia.

    He nearly pissed on the yanks.If you want to know who's in charge look on the SS s .iys not ASEAN or UK forces in Darwin

    Sayanora Nakimura

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    In just 3 years he managed this,compare with runts like Abbot and Gillard

    hitlam Government that:-
    1. ended Conscription,
    2. withdrew Australian troops from Vietnam,
    3. implemented Equal Pay for Women,
    4. launched an Inquiry into Education and the Funding of Government and Non-government Schools on a Needs Basis,
    5. established a separate ministry responsible for Aboriginal Affairs,
    6. established the single Department of Defence,
    7. withdrew support for apartheid–South Africa,
    8. granted independence to Papua New Guinea,
    9. abolished Tertiary Education Fees,
    10. established the Tertiary Education Assistance Scheme (TEAS),
    11. increased pensions,
    12. established Medibank,
    13. established controls on Foreign Ownership of Australian resources,
    14. passed the Family Law Act establishing No-Fault Divorce,
    15. passed a series of laws banning Racial and Sexual Discrimination,
    16. extended Maternity Leave and Benefits for Single Mothers,
    17. introduced One-Vote-One-Value to democratize the electoral system,
    18. implemented wide-ranging reforms of the ALP's organization,
    19. initiated Australia's first Federal Legislation on Human Rights, the Environment and Heritage,
    20. established the Legal Aid Office,
    21. established the National Film and Television School,
    22. launched construction of National Gallery of Australia,
    23. established the Australian Development Assistance Agency,
    24. reopened the Australian Embassy in Peking after 24 years,
    25. established the Prices Justification Tribunal,
    26. revalued the Australian Dollar,
    27. cut tariffs across the board,
    28. established the Trade Practices Commission,
    29. established the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service,
    30. established the Law Reform Commission,
    31. established the Australian Film Commission,
    32. established the Australia Council,
    33. established the Australian Heritage Commission,
    34. established the Consumer Affairs Commission,
    35. established the Technical and Further Education Commission,
    36. implemented a national employment and training program,
    37. created Telecom and Australia Post to replace the Postmaster-General's Department,
    38. devised the Order of Australia Honors System to replace the British Honors system,
    39. abolished appeals to the Privy Council,
    40. changed the National Anthem to 'Advance Australia Fair' (confirmed at 1977 Referendum),
    41. instituted Aboriginal Land Rights, and
    42. sewered most of Sydney.

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    44. Had to be removed under dubious rules by a British governor being bribed by the USA in order to prevent him telling the truth to patliament about who was really running Australia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by david44
    sewered most of Sydney.
    Which is where No. 44 below belongs. What a twit! All 44 by himself. Quite a record. Credit where credit it due.

    Quote Originally Posted by chassamui
    44. Had to be removed under dubious rules by a British governor being bribed by the USA in order to prevent him telling the truth to patliament about who was really running Australia.
    "Had to be removed by a British Governor..." Power grab. no doubt about it. America the evil empire strikes again. Dark ruler of the universe. You're not related to ENT are you Chass? Fu*k'en hell mate get a life.

    Quote Originally Posted by Necron99
    At the time Australia was considered terra nullius when the fleet landed.
    So, the original inhabitants of Aus. we're not there when the fleet landed? Eh?

    Seems a bit off the mark don't ya think? The American Indians weren't there either, so everything belonged to whom ever set foot upon the ground. Its not like the indigenous peoples were present in either the Australian case or the Americas.

    British ships carrying British criminal subjects to inhabit a territory otherwise thought to be uninhabited? Unlikely to say the least. So the Empire extended its reach into Australia and never looked back.

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