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Thread: Retired or not?

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    Retired or not?

    Just wondering if you were retired for a number of years, would you consider going back to work if the offer came?

    Its not like you've been looking for work and not like you need to work, but the offer is there and its certainly financially attractive...

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    Depends on how bored you are. And on the situation with the family.

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    Like so many other things in life, "It Depends".

    If the job offered was challenging and worthwhile to the public's interest which matched my views and if the remuneration was reasonable I'd give it some serious consideration. If it involved international travel, that would be a plus.

    In fact, that's pretty much what I have now. I'm retired but do international logistics consulting to foreign countries. I work maybe 1 project a year which consumes about 340 hours of effort with about 1/2 of that in the host country for which I'm doing the work.

    Keep the mind healthy to remain active and involved.
    "Don't Sweat the Small Stuff....and it is all small stuff"

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    Yes, international travel involved. Family life disrupted. Making lots of concessions regarding current lifestyle and many open ends.

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    Member zeusbheld's Avatar
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    a lot depends on how set you are for money without working, and how much that job would improve your lifestyle, i'd imagine..

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    Thailand Expat nedwalk's Avatar
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    I, m up for anything at the moment...ferk it , i,ll even be a whore..sorta

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    I'm past retirement age and still working. No doubt I'll work till I die. I did have a lot of fun when young tho. It's a trade-off. Have fun while you're young and crawl along when you're old or bite the bullet and bear the routine and boredom of sticking with one plan. Maybe the only people who take their working lives and saving up seriously are those who figured they'd be living until they reached retirement age .. I never did.

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    Workin for The Man.

    Retiring [whatever the fuck that is] for The Man.

    Working for The Man....again.

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    or TizYou?
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    I retired in 2004. In 2006 I received an email from an old college in Aus saying pretty much "There's a 6 month contract going here if you want it".

    So I went back and haven't yet gone back into retirement.

    In 2009 I landed my current gig in Singapore. Being closer to home has allowed me to keep working. If I hadn't landed a job in SG I probably would've already retired again.

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    I took early retirement in 2004 and simply have no desire to ever work again.

    I am fortunate enough to have sufficient funds and pension to allow me to lead a very comfortable life and to be honest the very thought of being tied to a project or employer sends a shudder down my spine.

    For me the longer i was away from my workplace the easier it became never to return.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ltnt
    international travel involved. Family life disrupted. Making lots of concessions regarding current lifestyle
    Why are you even considering it then.

    Do you need the cash?
    Do you want to run away from your family?
    Are you fed up with your lifestyle?
    Do you enjoy sitting in an aeroplane?
    D you enjoy spending time "alone" in a 5 star hotel?
    Do you need some confirmation of your worth?

    If any of these are a yes, do it. If not what's the point?
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

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    My first real job was at 17. My girlfriend's father felt sorry for me and got me a gig at North American Aviation, a lower level white collar thing. Had I stuck with that for 30 years I'd be sittiin pretty. Of course the sum of my experiences and travel and education would have been extremely limited, that is if living in Los Angeles, fighting the traffic, breathing what's left of the air and dining on the American diet didn't kill me first.

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    Member zeusbheld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camel Toe
    Maybe the only people who take their working lives and saving up seriously are those who figured they'd be living until they reached retirement age .. I never did.
    this is a good point; i've tended to view anythin over 33 (Jesus' age, or did i get that wrong) as bonus time since i'd done everything i needed to do before i die by then (although maybe i wasn't ambitious enough and shoulda gotten my mind out of the gutter).

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    I never expected to out-live my father and he was 53 when I was born.

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    Member zeusbheld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Camel Toe
    I never expected to out-live my father and he was 53 when I was born.
    i thought it horrifying when my best friend said he thought he'd be dead by 30, until i realized i felt the same way. fortunately (for me) i'm a squats-to-pee pussy or i'd have found a way to burn brightly and briefly by now...

    ps u sound familiar somehow...

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    ps u sound familiar somehow...
    I sold you some bad acid once ... sorry.

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    Depends if you need the money I guess. I think it would be pretty difficult to start again. I would be unemployable anyway, left to my own devices too long.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zeusbheld
    i'd done everything i needed to do before i die by then
    Would you care to post a list of these ultimate things you did before you were 33? It could be interesting.

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    In America a social security monthly means fvck all. But in the ThirdWorld you can make it. Work a little, lay back a bit, get involved in something, torrent movies, play video games, raise dogs, garden, the list is endless. I like being semi-retired. I also like being older ... or maybe closer to not being young and stupid any more.

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    I will retire in a year and a half after working in a job that I love to do.

    I cant wait really as I have many more things I want to do and returning to work will be the last thing I will want to do.

    Fuk that.

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    Philippine Expat Davis Knowlton's Avatar
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    I retired at 51, after 28 years working for the government. In the 12 years since I retired, I have worked all of it, but for myself, and taking the jobs I wanted, and working when I wanted. I retired young, and started up a company and a new 'career' mostly to keep active, and of course to augment my pension. I have a very good pension, my second 'career' brings in about 60% of my pension, so with the two, I am fine financially. I qualify for Social Security, but have not taken it yet - I will let it build to the maximum payout, and then apply for it at 67, and may quit my second job then. Since retiring, I have been able to stay at home with my family, and be a part of my kids' lives.

    After I retired from the government, I had some very lucrative contracts tossed up to me - in the range of $200,000 a year. After discussing them with my wife, I turned them all down. While doing them for a few years would have allowed me to build a nice fund, all were in dangerous places and had a fair amount of risk involved.

    I retired in the first place to be able to spend time with my family. I have no regrets about doing so. I would make the same choices again. Now, it's a moot point, as I am too old to do again what I used to do.

    One needs to do something after retirement to keep active, and the mind working. Working for yourself is tough, especially after years on the government tit, but at least you have a great boss. Those of my friends and former colleagues who retired, and then went back 'on contract' in general do not appear to be any happier than they were 'pre-retirement'. They certainly have more money than I do, but are burning up the limited number of years we all have left accumulating it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by ltnt
    international travel involved. Family life disrupted. Making lots of concessions regarding current lifestyle
    Why are you even considering it then.

    Do you need the cash?
    Do you want to run away from your family?
    Are you fed up with your lifestyle?
    Do you enjoy sitting in an aeroplane?
    D you enjoy spending time "alone" in a 5 star hotel?
    Do you need some confirmation of your worth?

    If any of these are a yes, do it. If not what's the point?
    I am retarded. You make very valid and mentally visual descriptions of the type of life I would be returning to. Thanks for that. I mistakenly was thinking I had some last minute obligations to my friend and could support him and the companies failing project. Misguided for sure. Your list presents all the reasons but one as to why I took early retirement, sudden death in some shit hole for what? I'm staying retired! Thanks for the sanity lessons all.

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    For many, employment is necessary to either sustain a lifestyle pursued by choice or simply one dictated by circumstances. It is what defines many and for some is nothing more than a chore but still affords the opportunity to enjoy a fellowship not perhaps available otherwise.

    Retirement can be a holy grail but ultimately resolves, if attained, to mere self indulgence. I have now realised that despite relishing its prospect I do miss the hurly burly of confrontation and being stressed in a challenging situation. Being nice and civil all day in a fluffy world of my own making is really becoming quite tiresome and I may even get a cat just so that I might give it a kick from time to time.

    The OP in dismissing the chance to re-enter the world of commerce in pursuit of his own self indulgence is fine and dandy but in doing so he is evidently letting his friend down. Sometimes self denial so others might benefit is good for the soul and just because we are all getting older does not mean we should be allowed to forget it.

    I think the OP should reconsider.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davis Knowlton View Post

    They certainly have more money than I do, but are burning up the limited number of years we all have left accumulating it.
    Thats it in a nut shell Davis. As we get older time speeds up and the next thing we know its lights out.

    Hence why I'm out the door at 56 and hopefully get some quality years in before I kick. Walking the beach in Bali will do me for a while.

    Some of the guys I work with are banging on in to there sixties but these guys are usually the ones that cant quite get there head around that there retirement years will be spent living 24/7 with a wife that they don't like so much anymore or Visa- Versa.

    They retire with a shit load of money but are trapped in there later years.

    Friggin sad cases these ones.

    If one gets on fine with the wife retirement is sweet but If one don't its a killer.

  25. #25
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    We are all different, retirement suits some, especially if you know how to fill your time doing what you like and are economically at a place you are happy with.


    But I also have had many former colleges for whom work was their whole life and identity, when they retired they quickly withered away and sadly in shockingly many cases died

    Others again are just Ironmen not capable of slowing down, always with several stressful projects in the works and new ones already in the pibeline, and they are only happy this way even if it is going to kill them in the end, good for them and very nice Guy's to have as friends, always willing and able to lend a hand if needed .

    Personally retirement suits me just fine, if I should get a sudden and unwanted desire to work I would go to see my Doctor a.s.a.p

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