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  1. #1
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    US workers to fill shortages in Australia

    The federal government will allow workers from the United States, such as electricians and plumbers, to get their licences to work in Australia on arrival.

    Federal Skills Minister Chris Evans said the measure would link Australian employers with skilled workers in the US to fill skill shortages, especially in the civil engineering areas.

    "This is a great opportunity to address skill shortages in Australia by filling shortfalls in particular areas with qualified candidates from the US, with applications expected to open from mid-April," he said in a statement today.

    Under existing arrangements such workers need to be assessed onshore, which can mean waiting months between entry and starting work.

    Under the new skills assessment process, US workers will be assessed against Australian regulatory requirements before entering the country.

    Senator Evans told reporters the assessment process was available to other nations and it was only logical that it be extended to the US.

    Immigration Minister Chris Bowen said the government was planning to run its overseas Skills Australia Needs expo in the US for the first time to attract skilled workers in the resources, energy and infrastructure sectors.

    Business groups including the Australian Industry Group, the Business Council of Australia and the US Chamber of Commerce applauded the changes.

    "There are clearly opportunities in Australia for skilled US citizens seeking work," they said in a joint statement.

    "There has been a skills shortage in Australia for the part 15 years and we can't get enough apprentices in the system in the short term," he said.

    "We also looked at other countries with a good vocational education system," said Mr Tighe, who is also the chairman of the EE-Oz Training Standards Skills Council board, which worked with the government to set the standards for overseas skilled workers.
    "There are unemployed skilled workers in European countries such as the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom."

    US workers to fill shortages in Australia


    Sign of the times I suppose, when we're employing 'guest workers' from the US. But it seems a good idea, for both countries. So if you've got a relative or something struggling to find work, send 'em down unda. We certainly find you easier to deal with than Somalians & Afghans.
    probes Aliens

  2. #2
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    Wonderful, outsourcing to the Mericans.

    Hi my name is Jose Mendez and I am a janitorial custodian Actually I envy one of my Uncles, you guys have a great system with benefits.

  3. #3
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    I can't imagine that such a policy is popular amongst the Australian public.

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    Will that American / Mexican Boon mee apply I wonder?

  5. #5
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    ^^ The trade unions naturally are a bit leery, but Australia has a skills shortage. For some years now, we haven't even been able to fill the number of apprenticeships we need to replace trade jobs vacated through natural attrition. Aussie's have no problems with Americans anyway- I think the average attitude would be that it's a lot better than some foreign refugee or whatever that hardly speaks the lingo. Some tattooed bogan that is too dumb or lazy to even bother doing a trade apprenticeship can still earn big money in the mines over there. 'Tis the lucky country.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    ^^ The trade unions naturally are a bit leery, but Australia has a skills shortage. For some years now, we haven't even been able to fill the number of apprenticeships we need to replace trade jobs vacated through natural attrition. Aussie's have no problems with Americans anyway- I think the average attitude would be that it's a lot better than some foreign refugee or whatever that hardly speaks the lingo. Some tattooed bogan that is too dumb or lazy to even bother doing a trade apprenticeship can still earn big money in the mines over there. 'Tis the lucky country.
    Got any links?

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    Yep, them Mericans look just like your Abbo's.

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    Well, some of them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Some tattooed bogan that is too dumb or lazy to even bother doing a trade apprenticeship can still earn big money in the mines over there. 'Tis the lucky country.
    You mean around 100 grand a year or what ? People always talk about the mines and the big money but what do you call big money ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by socal View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Some tattooed bogan that is too dumb or lazy to even bother doing a trade apprenticeship can still earn big money in the mines over there. 'Tis the lucky country.
    You mean around 100 grand a year or what ? People always talk about the mines and the big money but what do you call big money ?

    A minimum I would think.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rural Surin
    I can't imagine that such a policy is popular amongst the Australian public.
    I've heard it is harder to get a plumber or electrician then it is to get a heart transplant in Australia.

    Good for the public and industry as a whole I reckon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AUSSIE EXPAT View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by socal View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Some tattooed bogan that is too dumb or lazy to even bother doing a trade apprenticeship can still earn big money in the mines over there. 'Tis the lucky country.
    You mean around 100 grand a year or what ? People always talk about the mines and the big money but what do you call big money ?

    A minimum I would think.
    your real estate bubble is even worse then ours so im stayin here

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Rural Surin
    I can't imagine that such a policy is popular amongst the Australian public.
    I've heard it is harder to get a plumber or electrician then it is to get a heart transplant in Australia.

    Good for the public and industry as a whole I reckon.
    labor shortages are bad because it indicates that there is an unsustainable growth trend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by socal View Post



    your real estate bubble is even worse then ours so im stayin here
    And for that every Aussie is truly Grateful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by socal
    labor shortages are bad because it indicates that there is an unsustainable growth trend.
    So far from fact your not even on the ball park socal.

    The problem is every youngster these days wants to be an IT Technician working with computers and or software creators.

    Young kids don't want to get their hands dirty digging trenches. You will see this phenomena everywhere in the world with skilled workers such as plumbers and electricians becoming as rare as hens teeth.

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    Shouldn't imagine too many 'Merkins will go down under once they find out the tax rate there. That and the restrictive union rules...

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    You'd be surprised booner. I know a few from the US that first went to Sydney for a holiday, and ended up living there. I think the opposite is the case actually- after a taste of Aussie wages and working conditions, as well as general attitudes to life, work and the balance between- they tend to realise they weren't quite living in the land of milk & honey before.

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    The government for years has not funded trade schools properly. I can remember a warning of a lack of tradesmen in 1980. Im sure that the seps would be happy with our working conditions. I think in the main they are better than in the US. And they can walk around without a flack jacket as we are fairly kindly disposed to them at least until they start getting up and doing the wave the flag bullshit. Australians are not overtly patriotic. (not until we get pissed anywhere off the Australian mainland anyway). I would prefer training over importing but if jobs cannot be filled genuinely by locals why not. I think the following reasons is why we are more disposed to Yanks than anyone else.
    A: They wash more than ever leap year.
    B: they know what a good cold beer is and dont feel the need to drink warm horse piss.
    C: They dont spend half their life whinging about how bad it is here and how good it was in the country they just buggered off from.
    D: They are not endlessly waxing lyrical about some round ball game where some small tap has a football fairy rolling around in agony for an hour and have players sent off for what would not even be an infringement in more manly games.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by peterpan View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by socal View Post



    your real estate bubble is even worse then ours so im stayin here
    And for that every Aussie is truly Grateful.
    I will be over there if the real estate bubble grenades before ours does.

  20. #20
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    Federal Skills Minister Chris Evans said the measure would link Australian employers with skilled workers in the US to fill skill shortages, especially in the engineering areas.


    This make me laugh .
    A friend that I know who is a Engineer left Aussie to work in the States.
    As there was no work for him in Australia, as most of the engineering job have been sent of shore.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    Federal Skills Minister Chris Evans said the measure would link Australian employers with skilled workers in the US to fill skill shortages, especially in the engineering areas.


    This make me laugh .
    A friend that I know who is a Engineer left Aussie to work in the States.
    As there was no work for him in Australia, as most of the engineering job have been sent of shore.

    Our Brisbane office has some 2,000 Engineers. Because of the shortage of Australian ones, something like 30% or from either UK or US.

    The article in the OP is very good news and I hope they are successful in getting US tradesmen to come and work in Australia, specifically the Gladstone area. The craft labor shortage there is so bad it is seriously impacting the schedule of our projects in the area.
    TH


    Expos aim to lure US workers

    Andrew Probyn and Nick Butterly, Canberra, The West Australian Updated April 3, 2012, 2:25 am

    US combat veterans and highly skilled American workers will be enticed to come to WA under a resource industry-driven migration program aimed at plugging critical shortages in jobs vital to the State's mining boom.

    To attract US engineers, surveyors, logistics experts and other skilled workers, the Federal Government will hold expos, beginning in Houston, Texas, next month. As well as targeting US professionals and tradies struggling to find work, the Skills Australia Needs roadshow will also be geared at Americans leaving the US military after service in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    With resource project expansion peaking in Australia over the next three to five years, the Chamber of Minerals and Energy of WA says the Pilbara will need 34,000 extra workers - 27,000 in construction.

    Companies including BHP Billiton and Chevron are enthusiastically backing the idea after benefiting from a successful surge in Irish and British temporary migrant workers over the past 18 months.

    With a view to helping fulfil US President Barack Obama's promise in November that "no veteran should have to fight for a job at home after they fight for our nation overseas", the US Ambassador to Australia, Jeff Bleich, wants thousands of demobbed Americans to consider working in WA.

    Mr Bleich said former service personnel would be suitable for WA's resource projects because they had experience in "arduous circumstances, away from home and in difficult environments".

    "So they are fully prepared to go out to the Pilbara and up to Karratha and some of the more remote regions where these jobs are mostly in demand," Mr Bleich said.

    WA's unemployment rate is 4 per cent but it is 8.3 per cent in the US.
    Skills Minister Chris Evans said temporary skilled workers from the US would be accredited before they came to Australia. "The American skill base, similar occupational health and safety standards, English language, all those things, make for a good fit," he said.

    "They are well trained, speak English and they understand our work culture."
    Australian Council of Trade Unions president Ged Kearney said that before Australian jobs were "off-shored" there should be thorough market testing of the labour needs via an independent jobs board that advertised all vacancies.



    Unions cautious over bid to lure US workers

    Daniel Flitton


    April 3, 2012
    • Unions want to see evidence of gaps in the labour market.
    UNIONS are suspicious of plans to allow US construction workers fast-track recognition of their qualifications to work in Australia and meet skills shortages in large mining projects.

    The Gillard government yesterday said new rules for temporary migrants would allow Australia to attract unemployed skilled workers - especially plumbers and electricians - as the American economy suffered.

    An expo is expected to be held in Houston in May to showcase job options for US workers in Australia and US trade workers will have their qualifications certified before migrating. Similar expos have been held previously in Ireland and Germany.

    But unions demanded the government show specific gaps in the market to prove such schemes are not simply a ploy to import cheaper, short-term labour.
    ''There is no way unions, government, or the wider community can be confident that employers have made every effort to provide job and training opportunities to Australians before resorting to the use of overseas labour - whether from the US or any other country,'' said ACTU president Ged Kearney.

    The Greens also called on the government to train local workers or find better jobs for migrants already in Australia.

    ''We have many people in Australia with great skills, especially those who have from places like Africa or Vietnam, yet they're having trouble finding meaningful work,'' said Victorian Greens MP Adam Bandt.

    Science and Skills Minister Chris Evans and Immigration Minister Chris Bowen made the changes public yesterday along with US ambassador to Australia Jeff Bleich.
    Senator Evans said a ''spike'' was expected in the construction workforce in Australia over the next three years, from 35,000 workers at present to as many as 75,000 by 2015.

    He said the government was committed first to training more Australians, but the growth in demand would put a strain on building mines, railways and ports, and a pool of unemployed workers in the US could help met the shortfall.
    Mr Bowen said market demands would determine the number of US workers who came to Australia.

    The government denied the new rules to open job prospects to US workers were discriminatory, saying labourers from the Philippines and India could also apply.
    China last year complained about the ''infrastructure bottleneck and shortage of skilled labour'' in Australia and offered to bring Chinese workers to Australia to meet the shortfall.

    Mr Bleich said with 8.3 per cent unemployment in the US there were many highly skilled Americans looking to contribute - including military veterans who had experience working in isolated conditions.

    Employer groups from Australia and the US backed the deal, saying there was real potential for skilled US workers to temporarily fill skills gaps in Australia

  22. #22
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    Does anyone know if this offer applies to healthcare workers?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Loy Toy View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by socal
    labor shortages are bad because it indicates that there is an unsustainable growth trend.


    The problem is every youngster these days wants to be an IT Technician working with computers and or software creators.

    Young kids don't want to get their hands dirty digging trenches. You will see this phenomena everywhere in the world with skilled workers such as plumbers and electricians becoming as rare as hens teeth.
    That is partly true but it has fuck all to do with what I said.

    Notice how the US has less jobs now then it did in 2002 ? That is because central banks set interest rates too low and created an unsustainable boom in the mortgage and housing industry. The shortages of workers at that time led to a bust. Notice how Mexican illegal immigration was one of the biggest issues in the 2004 election and now you hear nothing about it ? That is why I am saying that the shortage of workers in Australia now (and all you have to do is look at house prices) is indicative of an unsustainable trend.

    And some people know how this all ends.

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    I heard there is more nat gas work being done in Aussy land then oil. I have to wonder what the boom is all about considering the price of nat gas has never recovered since 2008.

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    Why not eh

    Why not
    if they have the skills bring em over, currently we have to import indo,s and filipino,s who also have the skills i dont see it as a bad thing, just a shame aussies didnt bother to train more aussies in the first place , only our apathetic selves to blame

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