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  1. #26
    Thailand Expat VocalNeal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    They are still holding him, and apparently the Australian Ambassador to Serbia has been 'summoned', djoko's father is going spare & threatening demonstrations, and the Commonwealth & Victorian state gov'ts here are having a shit fight about it, as to who is gonna make the decision! He's been held for a few hours now. This is more interesting than the Australia Open.
    Easy. Offer him vaccination on arrival.

  2. #27
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    It's fucking embarrassing how the tournament directors and Melbourne had tried to kow tow to this fucking arsehole.

    Thankfully the feds have told him to fuck off. He's got his lawyers on it.

  3. #28
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Novak Djokovic’s challenge against his visa cancellation has begun in the Federal Circuit and Family Court.
    Judge Anthony Kelly called for more documentation and initially adjourned until 4pm, before standing down the case again until 6pm.

    The online court heard an application and affidavit was yet to be filed and relied on by the court.

    Nine News sports presenter Clint Stanaway says the world number one’s legal team is seeking an injunction which would halt his cancelled visa until he can appeal.


    Djokovic, who was originally scheduled to be deported tonight, is now expected to remain at the former Rydges on Swanston until tomorrow.


    “Given these delays, you’d have to draw the conclusion that the world number one probably won’t be deported tonight,” Clint Stanaway told Heidi Murphy, filling in for Tom Elliott.

    If Djokovic is granted the opportunity to appeal, the appeal would need to be heard and finalised by Tuesday, which is when Tennis Australia need confirmation on whether he’ll play in the Australian Open.


    “It could be at least tomorrow morning until we hear more about the injunction itself. I imagine the paper shuffling will continue tonight, and this will stretch into the weekend,” Mr Stanaway said.


    “If he’s successful with that injunction the appeal would likely be heard on Monday morning and we might not have a resolution until Monday night.”


    How Novak Djokovic's visa battle is unfolding in court
    Warning: Be cautious if you are a fragile pink

  4. #29
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Fucking brilliant. Let's hope some bent judge doesn't change it.

    "The ABF can confirm that Mr Djokovic failed to provide appropriate evidence to meet the entry requirements to Australia, and his visa has been subsequently cancelled," the agency said in a statement.


    Federal cabinet minister Greg Hunt earlier said the decision followed a review of the vaccination exemption and "the integrity and evidence behind it".


    The ABF also rejected claims from Djokovic's camp that he was denied access to his phone while he was being held at the Melbourne Jet Base at Tullamarine.


    "The ABF can confirm Mr Djokovic had access to his phone."


    Fully vaccinated travellers have been able to enter Australia without a medical exemption since December 15.


    However, unvaccinated people must provide proof they cannot be vaccinated for medical reasons or they will be deported.


    Djokovic has not disclosed his vaccination status but it is widely believed he is unvaccinated.

    Novak Djokovic not above border rules: PM | The Canberra Times | Canberra, ACT



  5. #30
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Even better:

    experts speculate it is highly unlikely his bid to overturn his cancelled visa will play out in his favour, and the consequences could mean he is barred from re-entering Australia for three years.
    Yeah, fucking do that too.

  6. #31
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    The genius that is the Mirror reporter.

    If that should fail and he is forced to leave, it seems unlikely the Serbian will be able to defend his Australian Open title when the tournament gets under way on January 17.

  7. #32
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    Allegedly he thinks his vaccination exmpet status derives from having had COVID earlier... fukn muppet!

  8. #33
    Thailand Expat AntRobertson's Avatar
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    "Djokovic is the #1 male tennis player in the world. He's on the verge of breaking the record for most grand slam singles titles by a male player.

    He only needs one more.

    All he needed to do was get his vaccine, but he didn't think that should apply to him.

    And here we are."

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    but he didn't think that should apply to him.
    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    Djokovic is the #1 male tennis player in the world.
    the two points are related.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWilly View Post
    Allegedly he thinks his vaccination exmpet status derives from having had COVID earlier... fukn muppet!
    It is perfectly valid to travel without vaccination if you still have antibodies in your blood from having had covid. I doubt he has the antibody count required for entry.

  11. #36
    I'm in Jail

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    Shameful of Australia, The PM backtracked very quickly.

    I was disgusted when the Aussies, weren't letting there own citizens back into the country before, but letting the sports stars buy all the seats on planes.

    The Aussies should of taken care of their own first.

  12. #37
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    he can fuck off, and take the aussie tennis admins with him.
    tennis is a poofs sport anyway.

  13. #38
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ukan Kizmiaz View Post
    tennis is a poofs sport anyway.
    ...pooves...

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Let's hope some bent judge doesn't change it
    Just the place , bENT in Bromley, bent at the bar and bent in Melbourne and why not ?

    Our love is equal, new Victorian judge tells his '''husband-in-waiting'''

    NOVAX Joke a bitch feck off until every single person who has lost their job from Fitzroy to Brighton has had an apology.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWilly View Post
    Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) and the Independent Medical Exemption Review Panel appointed by the Victorian Department of Health.

    “Djokovic applied for a medical exemption which was granted following a rigorous review process involving two separate independent panels of medical experts,” TA said in its statement.

    “Under an independent process, applications for a medical exemption were first reviewed by an expert panel made up of doctors from the fields of immunology, infectious disease and general practice.

    “Applications that met the national guidelines set by the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) were then subjected to a second review conducted by a Government-appointed panel of medical experts, the Independent Medical Exemption Review Panel.
    Who is deciding this persons ability to enter, it appears that the commonwealth and state medical groups OK his entry status.?

    Does the Commonwealth's government leader, in a hurry for re-election, override the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI), (a technical advisory group of the Australian Government) and the Independent Medical Exemption Review Panel appointed by the Victorian Department of Health?

    What do the Victorian state judiciary have to say?

    Who do the Tennis Authorities obey, the Commonwealth's government leader, in a hurry for re-election or the ATAGI + IMERP?

    Is this a political or health decision?
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  16. #41
    Thailand Expat taxexile's Avatar
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    the schadenfreude is freely flowing on this one.

    so it is good to see that one of the top seeded tennis players, who are never the most likeable of sports personalities what with their on court tantrums, their self importance and overblown sense of entitlement, has been brought down to earth with a bump and is now having to spend a few days in ( if his whining " its all about me " mothers description is correct) a flea ridden holding centre for illegal immigrants.

    ... and what is it with these pampered players mothers?

    judy murray is another one who is always quick to change andys nappies

    Novax Djocovid is in a hotel "for immigrants, full of fleas with horrible food" after being detained in Australia when the country rejected his visa application, according to his mother.

    World number one Djokovic faces a storm of protest about a decision to grant him a medical exemption from Covid-19 vaccination requirements to play in the Australian Open.

    The Serbian is hanging in limbo as his lawyers launch an appeal seeking to overturn the federal government decision. A court has agreed to not deport him for at least the next 72 hours.

    Djokovic’s parents accused Australian authorities of making him a "political scapegoat" in the battle between the conservative government and the left-leaning Victoria State Government during a press conference.

    "It is very difficult for me to go through this. No one deserved this kind of treatment, especially not him," his mother Dijana said.

    "This is a purely political attack on Novak, so that he does not become the best of all time. He is a scapegoat for me, but also a great winner. He is someone who is a revolutionary and who is changing this world."

    Live Novak Djokovic latest news: Star trapped in 'hotel for immigrants, full of fleas and horrid food', says mother
    a great story to cheer up the masses in these depressing covid times.

  17. #42
    Im bored AF Backspin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWilly View Post
    the two points are related.

  18. #43
    Thailand Expat David48atTD's Avatar
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    No Novak ... no Tennis down under for you

    -giphy-gif

    ^ Click the image if he's not moving.

  19. #44
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    The Serbian finger wag...

  20. #45
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWilly View Post
    Serbian
    They seem a pretty dumb bunch.

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    They seem a pretty dumb bunch.
    I offer YourDaddy as exhibit A...

  22. #47
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    Australia ‘let tennis players in with same exemption’ before blocking Djokovic – reports
    Reports from Australia suggest that at least two individuals entered the country with similar exemptions to Novak Djokovic

    6 Jan, 2022 11:58

    Snip:

    "Elsewhere, former Australian Open director Paul McNamee tweeted that the situation "beggars belief".

    "This is the only player I have ever known at the Australian Open who had his visa rescinded," McNamee told the local media.


    "Djokovic rolled the dice whether an exemption would be approved, he received that. If he didn't get that, he wouldn't be coming to Australia.

    "He was following the rules, players need to have confidence that the rules they abide by are going to be enforced...

    "He's entitled to fair play, there's no doubt there's some disconnect between the state and federal government.


    "I hate to think politics are involved, but it feels that way...


    "Whether you like it or not, Djokovic doesn't make the rules. He deserves his day on court, not in court," McNamee added."


    Australia ‘let tennis players in with same exemption’ before blocking Djokovic – reports — RT Sport News

  23. #48
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Novak Djokovic is desperate to be taken seriously. Now he’s becoming a punchline.




    By John Feinstein (WaPo)

    Novak Djokovic is the No. 1 men’s tennis player in the world and may end up the greatest male player of all time. There are some who think he’s already there.

    But he’s also a punchline now, something few truly great athletes ever become. Aaron Rodgers certainly did his best when he got caught misleading the public about whether he had been vaccinated for the coronavirus, and Antonio Brown took it a step further when he submitted a fake vaccination card.

    But neither of them were detained by border officials in Australia and held in a hotel as a court weighs deportation.

    Like Rodgers and Brown, Djokovic got himself into an embarrassing mess because he thought he was above the rules of covid decency and refused to get a vaccination that most people understand they need.

    Djokovic certainly wasn’t alone in creating the debacle that unfolded when he landed in Melbourne on Wednesday and was refused entry to the country. One day earlier, Tennis Australia, which runs the Australian Open, had announced Djokovic was being granted a medical exemption, allowing him to compete in the tournament even though he is apparently unvaccinated.

    Djokovic landed in Australia only to find that the government didn’t really care that Tennis Australia desperately wanted him to be there when the tournament begins Jan. 17 at Melbourne Park. The Australian Open is the least important of the four majors, but it was set to receive an extra dose of international attention with Djokovic going for a 10th Australian Open crown and a 21st Grand Slam title, which would vault him past Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, the two icons who also have 20 major titles.

    Federer is 40 and hasn’t played since June at Wimbledon. He won’t be in Australia because he’s still recovering from knee surgery. Whether he will play again — much less contend for another major title — is in doubt. Nadal is 35 and will play in Australia, but Djokovic beat him in Paris last spring, an almost unthinkable upset given that Nadal has won the French Open 13 times.

    The French Open was the second of Djokovic’s three major wins last year — he also won in Australia and at Wimbledon and came within a whisker of being the third man in history to win a calendar Grand Slam when he reached the U.S. Open final, only to lose to Daniil Medvedev.


    Still, it felt as if the 34-year-old’s coronation was little more than a formality, especially with Australia — his “home court” — next up. But Djokovic found a way to mess it up.

    That is very much a part of his history and his legacy. In 2020, during the covid-stricken U.S. Open, he got himself disqualified when he launched a ball off his racket in disgust and it hit a lineswoman in the neck. The fact that it was an accident was irrelevant; Djokovic, who seemed a near-lock to win the tournament with Federer and Nadal not playing, was gone before the end of the first week.

    Novak Djokovic checks on a lineswoman after hitting her with a ball during the 2020 U.S. Open. (Seth Wenig/AP)

    He has kept himself in the news off the court since the pandemic began. He put together an exhibition event in Serbia and Croatia that summer with few covid precautions, leading to an outbreak in which he and his wife, among others, tested positive. Since then, he repeatedly has refused to answer questions about whether he’s vaccinated, making it clear he’s not.

    For months, Australian Open officials insisted no one — players, staff members, media or fans — would be allowed into the tournament without proof of vaccination or a valid medical exemption. Djokovic applied for the latter, and on Tuesday tournament director Craig Tiley announced Djokovic had been granted the exemption by “two independent panels” and would be allowed to compete.

    Needless to say, this set off an uproar in Australia, where strict covid protocols have helped keep the death toll down. A year ago, during the tournament in Melbourne, fans frequently were forced to leave the stadium with matches still going on because of strict curfews.

    No one bought Tiley’s claim that Djokovic wasn’t being granted a special privilege. Tiley refused to name the other players who received similar exemptions and would not explain why Djokovic’s was granted. Djokovic, who would be free to do so, hasn’t given any explanation as to why he applied for an exemption.

    In short, if you believe Djokovic wasn’t granted a special privilege, Tiley has some oceanfront land in the Outback he would like to sell you.

    Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison clearly didn’t believe Tiley.

    “Mr Djokovic’s visa has been cancelled,” Morrison wrote in a tweet after Djokovic was detained. “Rules are rules, especially when it comes to our borders. No one is above these rules. Our strong border policies have been critical to Australia having one of the lowest death rates in the world from COVID, we are continuing to be vigilant.”

    No hedging there.

    The shame in all of this is that Djokovic should be venerated by tennis fans the way Federer and Nadal are. That all three have 20 major titles — Pete Sampras held the record at 14 until they came along — while competing against one another for the bulk of their careers is extraordinary.

    Djokovic came up behind Federer and Nadal and for years has been viewed as an uninvited interloper. He often is the black hat to the crowd when playing one of the other two. And yet he always has hung in and proved to be their competitive equal — at the least.

    At his best, Djokovic is smart and thoughtful and — in my opinion — likable. At his worst, he is bafflingly stupid for someone who is clearly bright.

    He has often treated covid like those who insist it’s little more than a cold despite the horrifying numbers worldwide that make it clear that’s not the case. Now he has turned it into a political issue, one in which there appear to be no good guys.

    Sadly, this is not unusual for tennis, which has about a dozen ruling bodies, all of which manage to do a lousy job of running the sport. When everyone claims to be in charge, no one is.

    And now Djokovic has become the leading man in an international incident. He may yet get to compete in Melbourne, and if he does, the tournament will be a soap opera for as long as he’s still playing. Or he won’t get to play and will face the embarrassment of being deported and missing a chance — at least for the moment — to become the all-time champion of men’s tennis.

    No one has worked harder than Djokovic to be taken seriously as a great champion. Now he has become a sad joke.
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  24. #49
    Thailand Expat taxexile's Avatar
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    Novak Djokovic is a useful distraction from Australia's Zero Covid failure

    World leaders’ outlandish threats against the unvaccinated are no way to tackle this pressing issue

    FRASER NELSON

    6 January 2022 • 9:30pm

    A tennis star is an unlikely target for a politician, but these are hard times for Scott Morrison. His approval rating is plummeting, he needs a good fight and fate seems to have handed him the perfect enemy. The unvaccinated Novak Djokovic, arriving in Australia in apparent defiance of the law, embodies something everyone loves to hate: an international celebrity flouting rules that others must obey. Public opinion is inflamed and Morrison is getting stuck in. “Rules are rules,” he says.

    He should know. His rules isolated Australia from the rest of the world for the better part of two years with a Zero Covid strategy that meant sitting tight, waiting for vaccines and then reopening. The flaw was obvious all along: what if vaccines never offered complete protection? At some point, they’d have to come out. So in recent months Morrison has been in slow retreat, moving Australia from a hermit kingdom to embracing a learn-to-live-with-it strategy. Politically, socially and clinically it has been an uncomfortable journey.





    Omicron means Australia’s protection isn’t quite what it could have been. Ninety-two per cent of Australian over-16s are double jabbed, but it’s boosters that make the big difference against omicron and just 14 per cent of Aussies are triple jabbed. Morrison is reopening anyway, arguing that a far milder threat should mean a milder strategy. Sydney and Melbourne moved out of lockdown ten weeks ago and Australia’s borders are once again open to (jabbed) skilled migrants and students.

    Meanwhile, the virus is running through Australia at a rate never seen before. More Covid cases have been recorded in the past eight days than in the previous two years. Its test-and-trace system is being overwhelmed, with isolation locking up so many people that Morrison had to relax the rules. But as cases surge, Melbourne’s reopening continues – after having spent more time locked down than any other city in the world. Hosting the Australian Open this month is the kind of reopening tonic it needs. Thrashing England at cricket is helping, too: Cricket Australia has been determined not to let Covid stop the Ashes.

    Local politicians are adopting a new language. Dominic Perrottet, premiere of New South Wales, has said the hospitals are ready. Brad Hazzard, his health secretary, has declared that “we’re all going to get omicron”, a complete change in strategy. Morrison needs to call an election by May: he’s lagging in the polls and needs a success story. The omicron wave just might be over by then.

    Emmanuel Macron also has an election coming up, and recently found cause to pick a fight with the unvaccinated. They are an easy target: easily caricatured as selfish refuseniks, whose obstinacy is dragging down the whole country. Macron this week promised to “emmerder” (a word best left untranslated) the unjabbed. Such tough language tends to go down well, and we can expect more of it in the coming months. For politicians standing for election, the unvaccinated are a perfect punching bag.

    For all of his athletic prowess, Djokovic is quite the quack: against vaccination in principle and also believing that polluted water can be purified by the power of prayer (“scientists have proven”, he once said, “that molecules in water react to our emotions”).
    But it seems that he was one of several unvaccinated tennis players approved for a visa to Australia via a “blind review”: if so, it’s hard to see how he qualified for special treatment. It looks more like he’s been given special mistreatment, having his visa revoked because he presents an irresistible political target.

    A few years ago, Djokovic’s health fads might have been seen as a quixotic but irrelevant personal choice. Now, vax-dodging is seen as a dangerous self-indulgence that wider society cannot afford. The world over, there’s a trend towards speaking about the unvaccinated as if they should suffer “consequences” and not have the same rights as others. Unjabbed Australians in the Northern Territory are being subjected to a four-day lockdown, for example, even though the jabbed-but-not-yet-boosted are perfectly capable of spreading omicron.

    Are such policies about protecting society, or about the need to “emmerder” the new enemy within? Singapore says it won’t pay Covid medical bills for the unvaccinated. France wants to ban them from cafés, gyms and museums. Unvaccinated Canadians cannot board planes or trains. A fertility clinic in Glasgow is denying treatment to unjabbed women: more such strictures can be expected. The unjabbed take a risk: they are at least six times more likely to end up in intensive care through Covid. But it’s harder to argue (as some do) that this is a “pandemic of the unvaccinated”. Even now, the vaccinated account for just over half of Covid emergency admissions.

    It’s easy to think of the unjabbed as millionaire tennis stars or middle-class conspiracy theorists like Piers Corbyn. But in Britain we have a clearer picture, being one of the very few countries to keep tabs. At the last count (December 29), they were – disproportionately – the poor, the young and ethnic minorities. Just over half of black under-30s, for example, are still not vaccinated, vs 27 per cent of whites. The poorest are three times as likely to be unjabbed as the richest.

    But this is no surprise. For years studies have shown that those on the margins of society have been less likely to be vaccinated. From MMR to flu jabs, a vaccine gap has always existed and reflected socioeconomic status. Huge steps have been taken to try to close it but, for complicated reasons (often relating to trust in authority), it’s hard work. Hounding or insulting the unvaccinated – fining them, quarantining them or calling them “idiots” as Tony Blair does – is unlikely to succeed. But it certainly will succeed in alienation, deepening a sense of them and us.

    As the world’s No 1 tennis player and the defending champion of the Australian Open, Djokovic can do pretty much what he wants with his life. But he’s a poor poster boy for the unvaccinated. To make them public enemies would be to make a bad situation far worse. Boris Johnson has said he’d like to “build back better” after Covid. Declining to join the global pile-on against the unvaccinated can be part of it. The vaccine gap has long presented a problem: now, perhaps, more than ever. But there are far better ways of solving it.

    Novak Djokovic is a useful distraction from Australia's Zero Covid failure

  25. #50
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by taxexile View Post
    Declining to join the global pile-on against the unvaccinated can be part of it.
    ...grossly irresponsible weakness in the face of an enormous health emergency...

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