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    World Land & water speed Records

    Lets start with Water speed record

    In 1977 Ken Warby broke the Outright Unlimited World Water Speed Record,on Blowering Dam N.S.W with a speed of 288.60 MPH, Ken returned in 1978 to set his second & current record of 317.60MPH, which to this day remains unbroken, Now 40 years on from Ken’s first world record,
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    Ken Warby designed Spirit of Australia on the family kitchen table in 1970, and started construction in the backyard in 1972. built out in the open, which meant Ken could only build the boat in good weather and in daylight hour’s, Ken would by a piece of plywood and timber as his budget would allow him, Ken built the boat with only 3 power tools, a drill, circular saw, and Belt sander, the rest was done with hand tools. Ken went to an RAAF surplus auction in Sydney, he brought three j-34 engines, 2 for $100 each, and one for $60, this would be his source of power. Ken had the boat ready to launch in 1974, Although the boat was far from finished, with no engine cowlings, air intakes, or tailplane, as Ken didn’t have the money to finish the boat, he setout testing the boat and built up the speeds to take the Australian National Speed record. With the boat building up speed Ken needed to find a longer stretch of water , after a long search Blowering Dam in New South Wales, near Tumut was picked at the location. Ken continued to build up speeds getting towards the 200MPH barrier. To help raise money for the project, Ken gave up his day job to focus on getting the world water speed record, Ken displayed the boat at Shell service stations around Australia( as Shell were one of Ken’s first sponsor’s) and Ken took up Oil Painting, Ken wanted to get windtunnel tests done on his design, this would assist him with working out exactly how to get Spirit of Australia the world record. Ken took his wind tunnel model to NSW University where Ken met Professor Tom Fink, Tom was one of the people who did the testing on Donald Campbell’s Bluebird K7, Tom was impressed with Ken’s design, and approach to the record, Tom ended up joining Ken’s team for the World Record bids.
    Ken would travel around the Australia in the mid 1970’s displaying Spirit of Australia and selling oil paintings at shopping centres to raise money for the project, Ken then gained sponsorship from local retail store Fossey’s, this allow Ken to finish of the work that was needed after the wind tunnel testing, The engine cowlings, Tailplane, and air intakes, Ken tested Spirit of Australia at Blowering Dam in mid 1977, now reaching speed in the 270-280 MPH range, Ken didn’t know it at the time, but the j-34 he was using had some blockage in the injectors, and couldn’t make full power, Ken & Tom Fink did some calculations and can up with the idea of taking 1 1/2 inches off the rudder. This allowed Ken to take his first world water speed record at 288 MPH in November 1977.
    Now Ken wanted to be the first man to break the 300 MPH barrier, Ken had assistance from RAAF personal, but this was in their spare time, With a new record looming, the RAAF approached Ken and offered their assistance, At Wagga Wagga RAAF Apprentice training base, they over haul one of Ken’s J-34’s, firstly they were suprised it even ran, let alone break a world record, Now with Sponsorship from Speedo, and a j-34 jet engine making full power Ken returned to Blowering Dam in 1978,this time became the first man in history to break the 300 MPH & 500 KMH barriers with an average speed of 317.60 MPH, not bad for a boat build in a shoe string budget,built in the backyard.
    Ken is also the first and only person in history to design, build and drive a boat to an unlimited water speed record, the first Australian to hold an unlimited speed record, and today the only man alive to ever hold an unlimited water speed record
    Spirit of Australia is now in the National Maritime Museum, Darling Harbour , Sydney Australia.

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    Now we have Ken Warby son, David Warby preparing to go for the World Water Speed Record

    Spirit of Australia II is the new second generation, Outright Unlimited World Water Speed Record Challenger by Warby Motorsport, the boat has taken 5 years to complete. Designed by Ken Warby, Spirit of Australia II is an new & improved version of Ken’s World Record holding boat, the original Spirit of Australia, Ken & Dave analysed the information collected from Ken’s 2 world records in Spirit of Australia, then set about making small improvements in the hull design to ensure the new Spirit of Australia II would be a record breaker. The improvements made includes the boat being slightly longer, sponsons altered, balance ( CoG) powerplant change, rudder modifications and safety. Spirit of Australia II has close to 50% more power than the original boat, Powered by a Rolls Royce Orpheus 803 Ex Italian Air Force Jet engines, removed from a Fiat Gina G-91 jet fighter. Construction of Spirit of Australia II was lead by Dave Warby, (an experienced boat builder & UIM & APBA accredited reinforced cockpit builder) along with the Warby Motorsport Team.
    Safety has come along way since Ken drove Spirit of Australia in 1977 & 1978 to a World Record, in fact Ken didn’t have seat belts, Warby Motorsport believe the safest thing you can have is the right boat design, knowing what works & what doesn’t on water, Plus experience, you must understand what you are driving, as there are no second chances here, despite this, Spirit of Australia II does feature the latest in safety equipment, featuring a reinforced cockpit, 6 point harness ,HANS Device, the latest Lifeline on-board air system, GPS tracking system, two way radio system, 3 stage on-board fire extinguisher system. Spirit of Australia II also has an on-board flotation system.






    Australia's David Warby hopes to break his father's 40-year world water speed record. All photos courtesy Warby Motorsport
    Currently soliciting sponsors and promoting a crowd-funding campaign called Help Dave Smash His Old Man’s Record (check out the video promotion the campaign at right) to raise money for the attempt, the 50-year-old David Warby is confident he’s going to set a new record by the end of this year or early next year. He and an incredible team of volunteers have been testing the boat incrementally in anticipation of the attempt on the same waterway. In fact, David’s ambition is to shatter his father’s record with a speed of 560 kph, which is approximately 348 mph.
    “Growing up as a kid, I watched my father build a boat in our backyard—not in a workshop—to take on the world and beat the world record not once, but twice,” said David Warby, who built Spirit of Australia II, a 28-foot jet-powered boat, with help from his father and many people who were involved with his father’s attempts four decades ago. “That’s my inspiration. I grew up around it all my life. I’ve raced and built my own boats, and my dad’s record is the holy grail of performance boating, in my opinion.
    “For me, having the guy who did all this next to you is a blessing,” he continued. “Of course, being father and son, we give each other crap all the time, but we work well together and we really plan out what we’re doing. None of what we do is a knee-jerk reaction.”





    The Spirit of Australia II boat features the latest and greatest in technology and safety equipment.
    In support of the team’s bid, Warby Motorsport recently announced a partnership with Road Tech Marine. David Warby said the team is looking to engage partners with synergetic views, and that RTM, which is a specialist marine tech store that carries many of the parts and specialty equipment the team needs for the boat, was a natural fit. The local RTM store in Newcastle is frequented regularly by the team in its bid to ensure all safety measures are met and modifications can be made.

    “It’s all about slowly building up the speeds and continuously testing the boat and her responses to our modifications as we push her faster,” said David Warby, who has tested the boat several times and has ran it faster than 200 mph. “RTM brings an extra level of expertise, trust and network to our team to ensure safety during speed trials.”
    A relative newcomer to the marine and road enthusiast market, RTM was started in 2013 by Gary Johnston following the success of his JAYCAR specialist electronic stores.
    “I watched intently when Ken Warby crucified Donald Campbell’s record back in ’77 and set the current world record in ’78,” Johnston said. “I am now delighted to come on board as a major sponsor with RTM. RTM specializes in providing solutions for all marine expedition and road-trip needs and we do mean all, having developed specialist solutions for the record attempt with Spirit of Australia II.”
    David Warby also thanked longtime Warby Motorsport supporter John Haggin, who was instrumental in founding the Miss GEICO Offshore Racing Team.
    “I feel like we have all the right things in place to put a record-breaker on the water,” David Warby said. “I know the boat is a lot safer than the one my dad drove. He didn’t even have a seat belt and we have a six-point harness, the latest and greatest safety capsule, better communications, not to mention a more powerful engine.”
    Featuring a Rolls Royce Orpheus 803 ex-Italian Air Force jet engine, the boat seems positioned to break the Outright Unlimited World Water Speed Record, or at least bring the world’s attention to Australia for the historic attempt.
    If it does happen, the boat is going to be displayed alongside the original Spirit of Australia at the national maritime museum for the entire world to see.

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    Donald Campbell killed in water speed record attempt – archive, 1967

    5 January 1967: Campbell was trying to break his own record in the boat Bluebird K7 on Coniston Water in Cumbria

    Donald Campbell died yesterday while driving his jet-engined boat Bluebird on Coniston Water. He was 46.
    The 12-year-old boat was making more than 300 m.p.h. when its nose lifted. Then it tipped over backwards and somersaulted 50 feet in the air and fell nose first. A curtain of spray rose. When it subsided Bluebird was gone.
    Divers tried to recover Mr Campbell’s body from some 120 feet of water, but there was not enough equipment. Lifting tackle and submarine lighting will be available when attempts are resumed today. Only plastic buoyancy bags and the two sponsons which carried the knife edges on which Bluebird planed at high sped were brought back yesterday, and they lie now by the slipway from which the craft was launched.
    Smooth water
    Yesterday morning was clear, with ice around the lake and snow on the hills when Bluebird was launched at about 8.45. Mr Campbell, whose latest pursuit of the world water speed record has been troubled for nine weeks by weather and engine failure, gave the thumbs-up and started his first run on seemingly smooth water.
    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/th...n-archive-1967

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    motorcycle land speed record


    Rocky Robinson

    605.697 kilometre(s) per hour


    You might not recognize a streamlined motorcycle as being a motorcycle at first glance. But all it takes is to catch one in action to know that those who ride them are literally pushing the edges of extreme speed.

    More than 50 years after the first modern, fully streamlined motorcycle was designed and concepted, Rocky Robinson of the USA broke the record for the fastest land speed on a motorcycle. Riding his Top Oil-Ack Attack on 25 September 2010, Robinson achieved an average speed of 605.697 km/h (376.363 mi/h) over one measured kilometer (0.6 miles) at Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah, USA.









    The record came for the average speed across two runs, but Robinson topped out at an incredible 634 km/h (394 mph) for a single run. It wasn’t the first time Robinson had tasted the glory of unprecedented speed. His current record marked the third time in his career – and all within a 4-year span – that he broke the motorcycle land speed record. Before breaking it for the first time, the mark that Robinson surpassed had stood for 16 years.

    The Ack Attack contains a carbon-fiber paneled body with chrome-moly tubing. It purrs on the strength of twin Suzuki Hayabusa in-line four-cylinder engines, with a 30 psi turbocharger boost. The maximum engine speed tops out at 12,000 rpm with an incredible net horsepower of between 700-900.
    It measures 5.99 m (19.67 ft) in length, with a height of 76.2 cm (2.5 ft), and a weight of 748.42 kg (1,650 lb).

    The Ack Attack was designed by Mike Akatiff in 2001. A motorcycle racer in his own right, Akatiff has worked with five crew members to create the record-breaking beast, which has been riden by four different riders.Robinson has ridden the Ack Attack since 2006, having broken the world land speed record in 2006, 2008, and 2010.



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    ^^ I remember that Campbell tragedy like it was yesterday mate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo746 View Post
    Donald Campbell killed in water speed record attempt – archive, 1967



    5 January 1967: Campbell was trying to break his own record in the boat Bluebird K7 on Coniston Water in Cumbria

    Donald Campbell died yesterday while driving his jet-engined boat Bluebird on Coniston Water. He was 46.
    The 12-year-old boat was making more than 300 m.p.h. when its nose lifted. Then it tipped over backwards and somersaulted 50 feet in the air and fell nose first. A curtain of spray rose. When it subsided Bluebird was gone.
    Divers tried to recover Mr Campbell’s body from some 120 feet of water, but there was not enough equipment. Lifting tackle and submarine lighting will be available when attempts are resumed today. Only plastic buoyancy bags and the two sponsons which carried the knife edges on which Bluebird planed at high sped were brought back yesterday, and they lie now by the slipway from which the craft was launched.
    Smooth water
    Yesterday morning was clear, with ice around the lake and snow on the hills when Bluebird was launched at about 8.45. Mr Campbell, whose latest pursuit of the world water speed record has been troubled for nine weeks by weather and engine failure, gave the thumbs-up and started his first run on seemingly smooth water.
    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/th...n-archive-1967
    Donald Campbell was using a 12 year old boat,

    Dave Warby has a new boat.

    Ken Warby is the first man in history to break the 300 MPH & 500 KMH barriers with an average speed of 317.60 MPH, not bad for a boat build in a shoe string budget,built in the backyard.
    Ken is also the first and only person in history to design, build and drive a boat to an unlimited water speed record.

    bobo you have a story to post in here mate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo746 View Post
    Donald Campbell killed in water speed record attempt – archive, 1967



    5 January 1967: Campbell was trying to break his own record in the boat Bluebird K7 on Coniston Water in Cumbria

    Donald Campbell died yesterday while driving his jet-engined boat Bluebird on Coniston Water. He was 46.
    The 12-year-old boat was making more than 300 m.p.h. when its nose lifted. Then it tipped over backwards and somersaulted 50 feet in the air and fell nose first. A curtain of spray rose. When it subsided Bluebird was gone.
    Divers tried to recover Mr Campbell’s body from some 120 feet of water, but there was not enough equipment. Lifting tackle and submarine lighting will be available when attempts are resumed today. Only plastic buoyancy bags and the two sponsons which carried the knife edges on which Bluebird planed at high sped were brought back yesterday, and they lie now by the slipway from which the craft was launched.
    Smooth water
    Yesterday morning was clear, with ice around the lake and snow on the hills when Bluebird was launched at about 8.45. Mr Campbell, whose latest pursuit of the world water speed record has been troubled for nine weeks by weather and engine failure, gave the thumbs-up and started his first run on seemingly smooth water.
    https://www.theguardian.com/sport/th...n-archive-1967
    They didn't find Campbell's body until 2001, thirty four years later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kmart View Post
    They didn't find Campbell's body until 2001, thirty four years later.

    And they recovered the boat, which recently ran again. I'm assuming that's what sparked this thread?

    Although the bloke did say he has no intention of trying to run it a record speeds again, for obvious reasons.

    World Land & water speed Records-telemmglpict000170963012_trans_nvbqzqnjv4bqpvlberwd9egfpztclimqfy2dmclwgbjjulyfpteliba-jpg

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...ched-daughter/
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails World Land & water speed Records-telemmglpict000170963012_trans_nvbqzqnjv4bqpvlberwd9egfpztclimqfy2dmclwgbjjulyfpteliba-jpg  

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    Name Date Place Boat Spec. Comment
    Henry Segrave[2] 13 June 1930 Windermere Miss England II Driver
    Vic Halliwell Riding engineer
    John Cobb[3] 29 September 1952 Loch Ness Crusader
    Mario Verga[4] 9 October 1954 Lago d'Iseo Laura 3
    Donald Campbell[5] 4 January 1967 Coniston Water Bluebird K7
    Lee Taylor[6] 13 November 1980 Lake Tahoe Discovery II Test run
    Craig Arfons[7] 9 July 1989 Lake Jackson Rain X Challenger

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    Here is a picture of Danny Thomson can

    Danny Thompson's Challenger II runs 450mph at Bonneville








    Danny Thompson takes home the official record his father Mickey Thompson set out for in 1960


    EIGHT years of testing and development for Danny Thompson and his crew in the twin nitro Hemi-powered Challenger II culminated in an incredible 450mph (that’s 724km/h, kids!) run through the traps today at Speed Week in Bonneville, Utah. Backing up yesterday's 446 and change, the official AA/FS record for the Thompson family will be etched into the SCTA record books at 448.75mph.

    Danny described the run as being ‘healthy.’ A gust through the mountain valley sent the car fish tailing and required some heroic steering inputs as you’ll see on the video! However, the lights had already been trapped and throwing out the laundry prevented any serious mishaps.
    Being lucky enough to witness Danny get out of his car at the top end is an indescribable feeling. A serene Sunday morning out past the eight-mile marker on the salt soon became an emotional scene of cheering, hugs and tears. The Thompson LSR crew are all volunteers including some that had served with Mickey Thompson all those years ago.

    Not only has Danny taken a phenomenal record, but at the time of writing he's currently in line to break George Poteet and the Speed Demon's seven-year run of holding both the fastest pass of Speed Week, and the title for the world’s fastest piston driven vehicle.
    A story that has stretched out for over half a century for the family can finally be laid to rest. Ask Danny what's he's going to do next? "I think I'm gonna go surfing!"

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    The land-speed record was in the bag, Donald Campbell was returned as the fastest man on the planet, Bluebird was the quickest car and South Australia’s Lake Eyre salt pans in the state’s Far North were forever etched as the vital ingredient that helped make it happen.

    Fifty years ago today, at precisely 8.10am, Englishman Campbell became the first man to break the 400 mile per hour limit in a wheel-driven vehicle.

    On July 17, 1964, with back-to-back passes in opposite directions near Muloorina Station, Campbell registered an average speed of 403.1mph (648.7km/h).


    Campbell’s record, unlike its legacy, was only fleeting. By December 11, less than five months after his Lake Eyre success, previously opposing regulatory federations agreed to open the record to any vehicle running on wheels.
    Campbell was already committed to becoming the first man to break both the land-speed and water speed records in the same year.
    He achieved the double on December 31, when he clocked 276.3mph (444.7km/h) at Lake Dumbleyung near Perth in his Bluebird K7 boat.
    Soon after, Campbell mapped out a three-year plan to build and race a rocket-powered vehicle capable of 840mph (1350km/h) — named Bluebird Mach 1.1.








    Thrust2 is a British designed and built jet propelled car, which held the world land speed record from 4 October 1983 to 25 September 1997.
    The car was designed by John Ackroyd and driven by Richard Noble. The project began with a budget of only £175.[1] On 4 October 1983 the car reached a top speed of 650.88 mph (1,047.49 km/h) and broke the record at 633.468 mph (1,019.468 km/h) (average speed of two runs within one hour). This was achieved at the Black Rock Desert in Nevada, US. It is powered by a single Rolls-Royce Avon jet engine sourced from an English Electric Lightning, and has a configuration somewhat resembling that of the mid-1960s-era J79 turbojet-powered land speed record cars of Art Arfons, collectively known as the "Green Monster" cars.
    KTVN TV (Reno, Nevada) reporter/photographers Michael Hagerty and Gary Martin covered the record setting attempt in the days leading up to the record. The car was unceremoniously stored under a tarp in the only automotive garage at Black Rock desert when it wasn't being worked on by the team. A propane torch was used to burn the line straight down the hard cracked dirt of the desert for the driver to follow. No other cars were allowed to approach the race track except on the perpendicular lest the driver accidentally follow those car tracks as a different path through the measured mile.
    In 1997 Thrust2's record was broken by Richard Noble's follow up car, ThrustSSC, with a top speed of 1,228 km/h.
    When the car was offered for sale at £90,000 in 1991, an extensive fundraising campaign was organised without government assistance to keep the car in Britain. The bid was successful, and today Thrust2 and its successor, ThrustSSC, are displayed at the Coventry Transport Museum in Coventry, England.



    Aussie Invader 2 holds the Australian Land Speed Record of 801 kph a round 500mph in 1994.


    McGlashan attempted to set the record in his jet-powered car, Aussie Invader II. The car was powered by a 36,000 hp Atar jet engine from a Mirage jet fighter aeroplane. In February 1995 Rosco and his team headed back to Lake Gairdner for an assault at the 633.468 mph (1,013.55 km/h) world land speed record, held by Richard Noble. This attempt was not a success, due to poor salt conditions, the course being very wet in places. McGlashan ran off course and hit the metal timing equipment at 960 km/h (600 mph). McGlashan walked away but the car was destroyed.

    Aussie Invader 3 was born




    The Aussie Invader 3 Team returned to Lake Gairdner in South Australia in 1996 and after some test passes, recorded a peak speed of 638 mph. This was faster than the World Land Speed Record held by Richard Noble at 633 mph. However, to claim a new world record, two passes must be made in opposite directions within one hour. Again bad weather prevented the team from achieving this goal.

    In 1997 the British, in their twin jet engine car, ran 763 mph creating the biggest jump in the history of the Land Speed Record. THRUST SSC went supersonic and made Aussie Invader III redundant. It was decided that a new car needed to be built to challenge this record. That is where we are now and the story continues with Aussie Invader 5R…





    ThrustSSC, Thrust SSC or Thrust supersonic car, is a British jet-propelled car developed by Richard Noble, Glynne Bowsher, Ron Ayers, Jeremy Bliss, Reece Liebenberg and Joshua Hambury.[1]
    Thrust SSC holds the world land speed record, set on 15 October 1997, when it achieved a speed of 1,228 km/h (763 mph) and became the first land vehicle to officially break the sound barrier.
    Both Thrust SSC and Thrust2 are displayed at the Coventry Transport Museum in Coventry, England. As part of the Museum's redevelopment project, both cars were relocated by specialist haulier from their position in the Museum's Spirit of Speed Gallery to the new Biffa Award Land Speed Record Gallery which opened in 2015.[2]
    The car is 16.5 metres long and 3.7 metres wide and weighs nearly 10 tons. It had a total thrust of 223 kN (approximately 50,000 pounds force, equivalent to around 110,000 brake horsepower).


    The car was driven by Royal Air Force fighter pilot Wing Commander Andy Green in the Black Rock Desert in the state of Nevada. It was powered by two afterburning Rolls-Royce Spey turbofan engines, as used in the British version of the F-4 Phantom II jet fighter. The car was 16.5 m (54 ft) long, 3.7 m (12 ft) wide and weighed 10.5 tons (10.7 t), and the twin engines developed a net thrust of 223 kN (50,000 lbf), a power output of roughly 60000 bhp (45MW),[3] burning around 18 litres/second (4.0 Imperial gallons/s or 4.8 US gallons/s). Transformed into the usual terms for car mileages based on its maximum speed, the fuel consumption was about 550 l/100 km (0.51 mpg‑imp; 0.43 mpg‑US).
    The record run in October 1997 was preceded by extensive test runs of the vehicle in autumn 1996 and spring 1997 in the Al-Jafr desert (located in Ma'an Governorate) in Jordan, a location unknown before for its capabilities as a test range for high speed land vehicles, with numerous advantages compared to the salt deserts of the Western United States.[clarification needed]
    After the record was set, the World Motor Sport Council released the following message:
    The World Motor Sport Council homologated the new world land speed records set by the team ThrustSSC of Richard Noble, driver Andy Green, on 15 October 1997 at Black Rock Desert, Nevada (USA). This is the first time in history that a land vehicle has exceeded the speed of sound. The new records are as follows:
    • Flying mile 1227.985 km/h (763.035 mph)
    • Flying kilometre 1223.657 km/h (760.343 mph)

    In setting the record, the sound barrier was broken in both the north and south runs.

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    Now these a new race to break the Land Speed Record by the

    Australian Aussie Invader 5R

    American America Eagle

    English bloodhound ssc



    Rosco McGlashan and Aussie Invader 5R


    The legendary Peter Brock once called Rosco McGlashan “A person who absolutely gives it a red hot go”. As the driving force behind The Aussie Invader team, McGlashan is determined to realise the dream he has spent over 45 years chasing. He sets his goals high and will not stop at being “THE FASTEST AUSSIE ON EARTH”; he now intends to be the “THE FASTEST MAN ON EARTH”.
    Aussie Invader 5R is being constructed by Rosco and a team of skilled professionals to achieve four main objectives:

    1. To set a new Australian Land Speed Record;
    2. To break the sound barrier;
    3. To set a new World Land Speed Record; and
    4. To reach a speed of 1,000 mph (1,600+ km/h).



    The Most Powerful Car Ever Built


    Aussie Invader 5R is the most powerful of the current three challengers, with 62,000 pounds of thrust from its bi-propellant HTP (H2O2) rocket motor. The total power output from the motor has been estimated at 200,000 hp, making it the most powerful LSR car ever built. The engine is being developed with existing technology, but also some pioneering catalyst pack development and Rosco and The Aussie Invader team are very excited to be working with several new and established rocket experts to bring this motor to life.
    Aussie Invader 5R has the potential to create LSR history and is likely to break many records as it approaches 1,000 mph. Reaching each of the incremental milestones will add to the excitement and media interest. The exposure the team will create in Australia and abroad, will assist in creating global awareness of the competition between the three nations and their cars.








    AMERICAN EAGLE



    After a hairy 477 MPH ride, North American Eagle land-speed racing team heads home empty-handed

    Despite a series of setbacks that kept the North American Eagle land-speed racing team from setting records during its most recent outing – and despite one run that nearly ended the team’s racing goals altogether – team members said they intend to regroup and continue their pursuit of the ultimate land-speed record.
    Though the team – headed by Ed Shadle and using a decommissioned Lockheed F-104 Starfighter – wasn’t aiming for the world record of 763.035 MPH during its late September test session at Alvord Desert in southeastern Oregon, it did have two other records in mind: first, the women’s land-speed record of 512 MPH, set by Kitty O’Neil in 1976 at Alvord; and second, the single-engine record of 633 MPH, set by Richard Noble in the Thrust II in 1983 at the Black Rock Desert. Shadle would pilot the Eagle for the latter, while racer and media personality Jessi Combs would pilot for the former.
    While a test run of the engine in July and a larger racing surface than in years past (10.5 miles) showed promise for the team, steering issues plagued the Eagle’s passes over the desert. Shadle cut short his initial shakedown run due to steering issues, as he did with a second 360 MPH shakedown run. A plane flying in parts to fix the issue ended up crashing on a nearby dry lake bed, though the pilot was unharmed and able to deliver the parts for Combs’s run the next day.
    Combs’s run, though, didn’t exactly go as planned. Without realizing it, she veered off course at 477 MPH and had to abort the attempt on the women’s record. “With all the speed and a few systems not doing their job properly, I unfortunately ended up in the ‘pucker’ bushes… with the 2 rear wheels still on the lakebed,” she wrote on Facebook. “We are all a bit shaken up from the potentials of what could have happened, tho it wasn’t worse, and we go back to the drawing board.”
    After that, the team called it quits for this year’s session.
    Shadle and the North American Eagle land-speed racing team have targeted the world land-speed record, set in 1997 by Andy Green in the Thrust SSC, since 1998, though the lack of funding and the lack of venues appropriate for the record attempt have hampered their efforts.
    At least two other teams – the British Bloodhound SSC and the Australian Invader 5R – are gunning for the land-speed record, and both have their sights set on a further goal of 1,000 MPH. Shadle has said that he’ll only consider 1,000 MPH once he breaks the record.
    For more information on the North American Eagle’s efforts, visit LandSpeed.com.





    The Bloodhound SSC - the British 1000mph Eurofighter-jet-powered land speed record challenger - looks set to make its first record attempt at the end of 2019 despite major setbacks to funding.
    Thanks to a shift in plans, the Bloodhound team, which recently lost composites suppliers that have fallen into receivership, is scheduled to make its first high-speed runs on South Africa's Northern Cape desert in May 2019, before making a record attempt in the final quarter of that year.
    The car won't be shipped back to the UK between its test and final runs, as originally planned, in order to reduce costs. The money saved from this decision is said to have kept the project on track.
    When the Bloodhound makes its first desert run, it will reach 500mph, which is seen as one of the riskiest speeds for the car. Between 400mph and 500mph, the car's progress is no longer dictated by its contact with the ground but its aerodynamics, making the car at its least stable.
    Bloodhound SSC: inside the factory building a 1000mph car







    The test will be the first time that the Bloodhound's aluminium wheels will be used. These are 35in units with V-shaped keels that will dig into the mud at low speeds but rise up and plane along the surface at 500mph. In the earlier UK test at Newquay airport, the car reached 200mph on runway wheels from an English Electric Lightning fighter jet.
    In the test, which can be watched below, the world’s fastest man of the past 20 years, Wing Commander Andy Green, was at the Bloodhound's wheel for the first time.


    Fifty test tracks will be marked out at the final desert location, with each being used only once due to the car breaking the mud surface on each run. Normal wheels cannot be used because their tyres will disintegrate at these speeds, due to the centrifugal force generated, whereas the aluminium wheels can spin at up to 10,200rpm, or 170 revolutions per second.
    Data from the test will be collected by more than 500 sensors across the Bloodhound and shared with schools around the world for student analysis. To prepare the dried-up lakebed for the Bloodhound's run, 16,000 tons of rock had to be removed by the local community, from the 22 million square-metre site - the largest land clearance ever undertaken for a motorsport event.
    Bloodhound's Andy Green on the challenges of doing 1000mph
    Before the Bloodhound makes its 1000mph attempt, likely in 2020, backers hope to top 800mph before the close of 2019, beating Green’s previous record (set on 15 October 1997 in the Thrust SSC) of 763.065mph. To do this, the Bloodhound's jet rocket will need to produce 13 tons of thrust - four more than was needed in the 200mph run.
    Only once this is done will the Bloodhound crew add extra rocket motors for an attempt to set a 1000mph land speed record. Green told Autocar that the thrust for this run will reach 20 tonnes, which is equal to the power all nine RAF Red Arrows Hawk aircraft or 180 Formula 1 cars produce.
    Bloodhound's ultimate goal: 1000mph
    For Bloodhound to achieve its ultimate goal, marketing director Ewen Honeyman - a man with vast marketing experience, including a stint in Formula 1 - emphasises how large a support network the project will need. Sponsors involved include Cooper Tires, engineering company Renishaw, the Belstaff clothing company and IT firm Oracle.
    Project director Richard Noble, himself a former land speed record holder, called the Newquay runway trials that were completed in 2017 “the biggest milestone in the history of the project so far” because they provided the team with their first opportunity to rehearse the procedures that will be used for Bloodhound's serious record runs.
    Noble said the Bloodhound team also see the runway trials as a way of thanking the schools, students, families and companies that have supported their project, which stalled for almost a year due to a shortage of finance until Geely - which also owns the London Taxi Company, Lotus, Proton and Volvo - agreed to become Bloodhound’s lead partner and finance the 1000mph project to its conclusion.

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    ^ Women's land speed record?

    WTF?

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    What is involved in building a car for a Land Speed Record
    A lot of money with a lot of hard work .
    Some very smart Volunteers to help in the design of the car.
    When the car is ready to head out to the salt lake or mud flats.( you need a large amount of money to do testing)
    You always have to start testing at low speed runs, to find out all the gremlins in the car. (make shore the electronics, fuel System, & parachute are working)
    This take a long time & slowly increase the speed each time you run.
    You can not run the car every day, as for bad weather, even wind above 5 kph can push you of course.
    If you are of course it is very hard to find your way back to the line again, you just hope you don't hit any thing on the track at speed.
    If of course then turn the engine off & deploy the chute.
    In Australia most of the time you only have a small window, that you can run the car. ( 4.30-5.00pm in the afternoon the wind drops enough to make a run, if it's a good number, then turn the car around refuel , check the turbine blades & wheel bearings with in 1 hour)
    Just before heading in the oposit direction you check the wind is below 5 kilometres per hour, then you can run again?

    If you are running in Australia all sort of things can run across the track.
    I guess also with Blood hound who will run in Africa, there must be a lot of Wylie life running around.

    When you think the car is ready to set a Land Speed Record you have to call the Cams official, Land department to survey & check that the course is true & correct

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    ^ Women's land speed record?

    WTF?
    Yes there is see if you can find any information Troy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    Yes there is see if you can find any information Troy

    Does seem a bit pointless.

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    Valerie Thompson checks out her streamlined motorcycle after it wrecked on Australia's Lake Gairdner (FIM)


    Women’s motorcycle land speed world record holder Valerie Thompson survived a horror crash in Australia on Monday when her streamlined bike crashed at 343 mph.
    Thompson was going for the overall two-wheel record of 376 mph during the World Speed Trials on Lake Gairdner when something went wrong during her run and the bike fell onto its side, digging a deep trench into the salt flats and spreading wreckage over a mile.

    A preliminary report from the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme, the sanctioning body for the event, said that the rear of Thompson’s “Bub 7” motorcycle came off the ground before its parachutes brought it to a stop.

    Valerie Thompson and her "Bub 7" motorcycle. (Valerie Thompson Racing)
    –– ADVERTISEMENT ––



    Thompson walked away from the accident and tells Fox News that she’s fine and on the way back to Scottsdale, Ariz., where she’ll go over the data and in-bike video to try to determine what happened.

    Thompson was the first woman to break the 300 mph on two wheels. (Valerie Thompson Racing)


    “Bike is not in good shape but I'm doing OK,” she said.
    Aside from a few bumps and cuts, Thompson thinks she got through it unscathed, but will get checked for a concussion when she gets home.
    "I told my husband, if I start getting strangely sweet on you, you'll know something's wrong!"

    The good news is that while she was shaking down the bike during the Dry Lakes Racers Australia Speed Week event in the days before the World Speed Trials, she broke her 304 mph women’s record with a complete 328 mph run.

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    Back in 1965, Lee Breedlove set the women's land speed record on Utah’s Salt Lake Flats with an average speed of 308.51 mph (496.49 km/h) over four runs. That record stood for 48 years until this month, when Jessi Combs smashed it in her 52,000 hp North American Eagle Supersonic Speed Challenger with a speed of 392.954 mph (632.39 km/h).

    On October 9, running out on Oregon’s 13 mile (20.9 km) Alvord Desert course, which is essentially a dried out lake bed, TV celeb Jessi Combs' first pass in the North American Eagle (NAE) Supersonic Speed Challenger delivered a top speed of 371 mph (597 km/h). Rules require racers to complete two passes within a one hour time frame and on the second run using the Eagle’s afterburner to full effect, Combs hit a speed of 440.7 mph (709.25 km/h), producing a record breaking average speed of 392.954 mph (632.39 km/h). The Eagle’s afterburner does provide the pilot a short burst of instant power, essentially doubling output from an already impressive 52,000 hp.


    The converted F-104 Lockheed Starfighter that Combs pilots once actually served as a chase plane for both the record breaking X-15 experimental jet and the SR-71 Blackbird. Retaining its original intake ducts but sporting smaller wings to retain speed stability, the NAE racer now weighs in at 13,000 lb (5,896 kg) and measures 56 ft (17.07 m) from nose to tail and just over 7 ft (2.1 m) across at the widest point on the engine intakes.


    Propelled by a General Electric LM-1500 Turbojet engine, the NAE crew increased the engine’s stock output by 10,000 hp from the leisurely 42,000 hp used for low speed test runs, up to the current 52,000 hp. But with great power comes great mileage degradation. North American Eagle reports the jet's appetite for fuel at idle to be in the 40 gallons/minute (151 L/min) range, but when under full throttle the Eagle vaporizes out 80 gallons/minute (302.8 L/min). Kick in the afterburner and another 10 gallons (37.8 L) disappears out the Eagle’s oversized, military grade tailpipe every minute.


    As the Federation International de Automobile (FIA) is the governing body for land speed records, strict rules regarding engines and wheel configurations had to be followed in order to properly qualify. The FIA rules require the vehicle to be considered a “car” sporting four wheels. So in order for the Eagle to blast across at the lake bed at subsonic speeds, solid billet aluminum wheels were chosen. Solid aluminum wheels not only reduce rolling weight but remove traditional concerns regarding centrifugal forces associated with rubber tires. The solid wheel system also allows the driver to focus on “piloting” the ground based fighter rather than having to drive it.


    Inside the cockpit, Comb’s surroundings, like most race cars, are sparse and minimalistic. Instrumentation is limited to engine temperature gauges, fuel and oil pressure gauges and the all important air speed indicator and mach meter. The steering wheel is a joystick, providing tail and rudder control at speeds similar to its airborne brethren. Unlike traditional fighter jets where oxygen is supplied to the pilot, the NAE team went with a simpler system using a scuba diving tank to provide compressed air.


    The NAE crew hopes to break the existing land speed record of 761 mph (1,225 km/h) in the Eagle in 2014, this time with team owner Ed Shadle at the stick. In the meantime, Jessi Combs next plans to chase down the existing female speed record of 512 mph (824 km/h) achieved in 1976 by stunt woman Kitty O’Neil in a three-wheeled racer.


    Watch Jessi's 440 mph run via the vid link.

    Last edited by Ratchaburi; 14-08-2018 at 04:38 PM. Reason: picture did not work first time

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    The current holder of the Outright World Land Speed Record is ThrustSSC, a twin turbofan jet-powered car which achieved 763.035 mph - 1227.985 km/h - over one mile in October 1997. This was the first supersonic record as it broke the sound barrier at Mach 1.016.
    Other famous holders of the Outright World Land Speed Record include:

    Thrust II driven by Richard Noble
    - achieved a best speed of 633.468mph / 1019.47km/h in 1983

    The Blue Flame driven by Gary Gabelich
    - first to exceed 1000 km/h - 630.388 mph / 1014.496 km/h in 1970
    Spirit of America driven by Craig Breedlove
    - achieved a best speed of 600.601mph / 966.574km/h in 1965

    Blue Bird driven by Malcolm Campbell
    - achieved a best speed of 301.129mph / 484.620km/h in 1935

    Golden Arrow driven by Henry Segrave
    - achieved a best speed of 231.36mph / 327.34km/h in 1929
    Records up to 1935 were predominately set on beaches before the Bonneville Salt Flats in the USA became the preferred venue for attempts and was home of nearly all Outright World Land Speed Records set between 1935 and 1970. The current Outright World Land Speed Record was set at Black Rock Desert, USA.

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    Who Kitty Hambleton (née O'Neil)
    What 825.126 kilometre(s) per hour
    Where United States (Alvord Desert)
    When 06 December 1976

    The highest land speed recorded by a woman is 825.126 km/h (512.710 mi/h), by Kitty Hambleton (USA) in the rocket-powered SM1 Motivator in the Alvord Desert, Oregon, USA, on 6 December 1976. The highest speed measured during the runs was 843.323 km/h (524.016 mi/h), although she probably touched 965 km/h (600 mi/h) momentarily.



    The fastest women : land speed record in a car

    6:58 PM Sport facts, Technology facts, World Records





    Kitty Hambleton( formerly O'Neil) is the fastest woman on Earth, as she holds the women's land speed record on a car : she reached up to 825.127 km/h, in December 6, 1976. Driving her rocket car SM1 Motivator in the Alvord Desert, she probably even (briefly) reached a speed of 965 km/h, yet, using only 60% power of her car engine. Actually, she could have surpassed the world record, if her contract did not stipulate that she was authorized to break the women's record ... but forbidden to break the men land speed record!



    Story began in the 1970s, in the heart of a hellish technological battle whose purpose was the world record for speed on a land vehicle. To compete with the previous record set in 1970 by Gary Gabelish, the first man to surpass the 1000 km/h barrier (precisely, 1001.667 km/h), businessman and producer Had Needham and designer-engineer Bill Fredrick planned to create a three wheels mini-rocket, specifically designed not only to break the land speed record, but also to approach or exceed sound barrier.


    The built prototype (a Budweiser rocket - this name was given to it later), the SMI Motivator, is a tricycle gear tube 12 meters long, not only equipped with a V4 engine fueled with hydrogen-peroxide hybrid propellant (that can develop a power of 48 000 horsepowers), but also an extra booster JATO (Jet-assisted Take-off Unit) formed by a Sidewinder missile stage, developing a power output of 12,900 horsepowers.


    Kitty Hambleton (yet Kitty O'Neil at that time), was the pilot that had to test the machine in the Alvord Desert, a dry lake in Oregon. And the tests were more than a success, since the rocket literally hovers over the ground at 825 km/h (825.127km/h or 512.710 mph - the official record), probably reaching up to 965 km/h on small portions of the track. But it may look surprising that with the same machine, Stan Barret later reached even higher speed, in December 17, 1979, recording 1190 km/h on a mile (739.666 mph), and managed to briefly exceed the sound barrier (set at 731 mph at that day).


    So why Kitty wasn't able to reach such a high speed before? Are women unable to push as strong as men on the accelerator pedal? Real reason is quite pathetic, actually.


    Needham wanted to register his name in history: so it was specifically asked to Kitty to sign a contract allowing her to perform the test in order to overcome the woman speed record, but with the obligation TO NOT exceed the man world record, held by Gary Gabelish. Thus, Needham could achieve the performance later. Ironically, Needham never performed as good as Kitty. World record (unofficial, since Car federations still not recognize this record) was actually reached by Stan Barret a few years later. Well, the possibility that a woman could break the "Man's land speed record" and become the Earth champion, may have been a hypothesis that made some frowning eyebrows ...

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    KillaJoule is the world’s fastest electric motorcycle with a top speed of 270 mph (434 km/h) so far. Builder, owner, and rider is Eva Håkansson.
    The only purpose of this 19 ft. (5.6 meter), 400 HP, sleek motorcycle is to show that eco-friendly can be fast and sexy.
    The KillaJoule may look complicated, but if you think about it, it is just a giant cordless drill with wheels! It has a battery with the same kind lithium-ion chemistry that you will find in cordless tools, a motor, some power electronics and a throttle. And wheels, of course. Except for the wheels, it is pretty much the same components in as in a cordless drill. A 400 horsepower cordless drill.





    Eva Hakansson ? The world's fastest female motorcycle rider!

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    Is hydroplane racing a thing in OZ? Here in the states it was a popular sport but has been in decline in recent years. Here in Seattle we just had our Seafair weekend which includes an airshow with the Blue Angels and hydroplane races. I see that the Slo-Mo-Shun IV piloted by Stanley Sayres in the '50s briefly held the record and set it here on Lake Washington where the hydo races are still held today.



    Early in the morning of 26 June 1950 a small red boat skipped across Lake Washington, near (Sand Point) Seattle, and improved on Campbell's record by 29 km/h (18 mph). The boat was called Slo-Mo-Shun IV. It was built by Seattle Chrysler dealer Stanley Sayres. The piston-engined boat was able to run at 160 mph (260 km/h) because its hull was designed to lift the top of the propellers out of water when running at high speed. This phenomenon, called ‘prop riding’, further reduced drag. In 1952 Sayres drove Slo-Mo-Shun to 287.25 km/h (178.49 mph) - a further 29 km/h (18 mph) increase. The run on Lake Washington was completed at 7:10 a.m., early enough that few people witness the event.

    The Seattle trio: owner/driver Stanley S. Sayres, designer/riding mechanic Ted Jones, and builder Anchor Jensen, had toppled Sir Malcolm Campbell's world mark of 141.740, established in England in 1939 with BLUEBIRD K4. The era of the three-point (suspension) design of hydroplane had arrived, a death knell for 'Thunderboats' that ploughed water with fully submerged props.

    Slo Mo Shun measured 28-1/2 feet, sporting an Allison aircraft engine. She was not the first Unlimited hydroplane to "prop-ride" on a semi-submerged propeller. But she was the first to get it all tuned to be able to reap championship results in the application of the concept. For the next twenty years, boats emulated the SLO-MO design if they wanted to be competitive.

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    Here yu go Bsnub


    Hydroplanes could be described as the "open wheelers' of boat racing. These boats are specifically are designed to go fast! They do not particularly have any other purpose.
    Hydroplanes are designed to ride on a cusion of air. The sponsons on either side of the boat create an air trap under the main portion of the boat. As the air is trapped under the boat, the resulting pressure effectively lifts the boat out of the water, causing teh boat to "plane" on top for the water. This style of boats are very spectacular to watch as they dance over the waves.
    Hydroplane classes range from 1.6 litre restricted up to the supercharged Grand Prix Hydroplanes. There is also the class of Unlimited Hydroplane which include such powerplants as Rolls Royce Merlin engines and in the past has included Jet Turbines
    For more information and illustrations displaying the anatomy of a hydroplane, visit the NSW Hydroplane Club's website.
    View photos of some of Australia's hydros here.




    Race Classes
    These classes are the most active hydroplane classes in Australia at this time:
    Unlimited Hydroplane - The biggest and baddest hydros in Australia. There are only a handful of the se boats left in the country. Powered by such engines as Rolls Royce Merlin V12s. Boats can measure up to 30 feet in length.
    Grand Prix Hydroplane - The Grand Prix Hydroplane class is of international standard with competitors in New Zealand, U.S.A and Canada. Hulls are manufactured from conventional timber to the most modern composite materials available. Size of these craft are generally 24 feet in length and are powered by either supercharged or turbo charged Chevrolet engines producing some 1600 hp, propelling the craft up to 170 mph in race conditions.
    6000 cc. Hydroplane - This class is only bound by engine capacity. The most prominent engine is the 350ci Chev V8.
    5200 cc. Hydroplane - This class is only bound by engine capacity. The most prominent engine is the Holden 308ci V8.
    4600 cc. Hydroplane - This class is only bound by engine capacity. Engine choices include modified Holden 253 V8, 283ci Chev V8, Lexus Quad Cam 4.0 litre V8.
    4.2 Litre Stock Hydroplane - These boats run a stock 4.2 Litre / 253ci Holden V8. Some modicifactions can be made in regards to running a 4 barrel carby, camshaft selection, but it is essentially a stock engine.
    3750 cc. Hydroplane - This class is only bound by engine capacity. Engine choices include 3.3litre Falcon 6 cylinder, 3.0 litre Nissan SOHC 6 cylinder, 3.5litre Rover V8.
    1.6 Litre Hydroplane - These boats run a stock 1.6 litre Toyota Twin Cam engine. Some modicifactions can be made in relation to the replacement of the factory injection with Weber carbs. This class originally began as the Formula Ford class running the 1600cc Kent (Escort) Ford engine. Scarcity of parts caused the update of engine choice.
    t



    Australian Class Speed Records - as at August 2006


    Boat Driver Speed (kph) Venue Date
    Unlimited Hydroplane
    AUSSIE ENDEAVOUR D Parker 305.80 Lake Eppalock 12.6.94
    6000 cc. Hydroplane
    SPLITFIRE B Chaplin 230.41 Lake Eppalock 6.6.93
    5200 cc. Hydroplane
    WASP TWO E Nunn 214.57 Lake Munmorah 18.5.69
    4600 cc. Hydroplane
    WASP TWO S Turvey 196.94 Lake Munmorah 14.6.79
    4.2 Litre Stock Hydroplane
    STREAMLINE G Holland 200.19 Lake Eppalock 12.6.88
    3750 cc. Hydroplane
    THE WASP G Rodgers 201.07 Lake Eppalock 9.6.85
    1.6 Litre Hydroplane
    AQUASONIC S Scott 161.37 Lake Eppalock 12.6.94

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