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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntRobertson View Post
    This woman has just done 296 kmh...








    ...on a bike!

    https://www.nzherald.co.nz/sport/new...ectid=12127744

    Here yu go Ant
    American woman pedals 296 kmh, smashing record held by men for more than 100 years

    A 45-year-old American woman shattered a two-decade-old cycling speed record, pedaling 183.9 mph (296 kmh) across Utah's Bonneville Salt Flats in the slipstream of a specially designed racecar.
    The record for paced cycling speed was previously held by Dutch rider Fred Rompelberg, who hit a top speed of 167 mph (268 kmh) in 1995.
    For yesterday's record-breaking attempt, Denise Mueller-Korenek rode a custom-designed machine featuring a unique double drivetrain capable of propelling the bike forward 128 feet with each revolution of the pedals, a necessity for hitting speeds surpassing the takeoff velocity of the typical commercial jetliner.
    By contrast, a typically geared bike might travel about 17 feet with each pedal revolution, and racing bikes used in competitions like the Tour de France hit around 30 feet per turn of the pedals in their highest gear.



    Denise Mueller-Korenek and Shea Holbrook with the fire cycle bike and dragster. Photo / Getty

    Because of the extreme gearing of the bike, Mueller-Korenek was towed for the first two miles of the five-mile course behind a dragster driven by Shea Holbrook, a professional racecar driver.
    At a speed of over 100 mph (160 kmh), Mueller-Korenek released the cable attaching her bike to the rear of Holbrook's car and pedaled the remaining three miles on her own. She benefited from the aerodynamic boost provided by the dragster, speeding along just inches ahead of her front wheel.
    Vehicle-assisted speed records are nearly as old as the modern bicycle itself. As early as 1899, an American named Charles "Mile-a-Minute" Murphy hit a speed of 60 mph in the wake of a Long Island Rail Road train. Subsequent speed records were set with the assistance of motorbikes, cars and eventually racecars designed specifically for the purpose.
    Pursuing the motor paced record is a dangerous pastime given the high speeds involved, as well as the proximity to a souped-up vehicle. Rompelberg, the previous record holder, broke 24 bones in one of his first attempts to break the record after his pace car began fishtailing at 140 mph, flinging him out of the slipstream and into the air.


    Mueller-Korenek set a women's speed record of 147 mph in 2016. It took her two years to return to the salt flats to attempt to best the men's record, in part because of a string of setbacks in 2017: a crash that broke a shoulder blade and a rib, as well as an accidental self-inflicted gunshot wound to the leg.
    Mueller-Korenek, the CEO of a home security firm and a mother of three, is the first woman to hold the speed record. "Denise & I are the only women in the history to attempt and now hold this record," her driver, Holbrook, noted on Facebook.
    The paced record is one of a number of different cycling speed records, which vary by the equipment and rules involved. The top speed for a human-powered bicycle without any vehicle assistance is 89.6 mph, set on a recumbent bicycle fully enclosed by a bullet-shaped fairing. For a traditional upright bicycle without any aerodynamic assistance, the closest analogue to Mueller-Korenek's record is probably the 200-meter track time trial, which the current world record holder completed at a speed of about 48 mph.
    Mueller-Korenek isn't the only woman to recently demolish a long-standing cycling record held by men. In 2017, Florida cyclist Amanda Coker biked 86,573.2 miles in a single year, surpassing the previous mark by more than 10,000 miles. To pull it off she averaged about 237 miles per day.
    Mueller-Korenek credits her coach, previous paced speed record holder John Howard, with inspiring her to tackle the record herself. She writes on her website that when Howard approached her about being the first woman to hold the record, it was like "a match being thrown on gasoline."













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  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Farlang View Post
    Once owned by Sir Donald Campbell of Bluebird World speed record fame, his plane is currently forsale in Qld, Aust.

    https://www.planesales.com.au/detail...-Apache-160-hp

    So that's a 60 year old plane

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    and pedaled the remaining three miles on her own
    No, she was sucked along by the "car" in front of her.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    So that's a 60 year old plane
    With nostalgic history.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    No, she was sucked along by the "car" in front of her.



    With nostalgic history.

    it's possible that it is still around & not fallen out of the SKY , as the Engines aprox 300 hrs.
    You would buy it, but not fly it. Right OhOh

  5. #55
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    Administrators in at firm behind Project Bloodhound







    Bloodhound Programme, the Bristol-based company behind a project to break the land speed record has appointed administrators. The move is intended to provide some breathing space while investment of £25m is sought to support the project through to completion.
    Andrew Sheridan and Geoff Rowley, partners at specialist business advisory firm FRP Advisory LLP, have been appointed as joint administrators.
    Project Bloodhound was founded in 2007 and aims to hit speeds of 1,000 mph at a specially built, 18km long, 1,500m wide race track at Hakskeen Pan in the deserts of the Northern Cape of South Africa.
    In addition to seeking to break the land speed world record, the project is a focal point for a science, technology engineering and maths education campaign which has reached more than two million children since its launch.
    The project has operated on a partnership and sponsorship model, with support from a variety of partners including Rolls Royce and Rolex as well as the Ministry of Defence which has lent prototype jet engines for the car, and the Northern Cape Provincial Government in South Africa, which has supported the creation of the track. Individual donations from members of the public have also supported the development of the car and the global education programme.
    The project has already built a viable racing car which has been tested to 200mph, whilst developing or testing propulsion, aerodynamic and telecommunications technologies with the potential for far reaching applications outside of the project.
    The company is now seeking about £25m in investment to provide guaranteed funding and see the project to completion.
    Andrew Sheridan, joint administrator, said: "Bloodhound is a truly ground-breaking project which has already built a global audience and helped to inspire a new generation of STEM talent in the UK and across the world.
    "Entering into administration provides some breathing space to identify an investor who will bring the guaranteed funding, impetus and expertise required to drive the project forward.
    "Whilst not an insignificant amount, the £25m Bloodhound requires to break the land speed record is a fraction of the cost of, for example, finishing last in a F1 season or running an Americas Cup team.
    "This is an opportunity for the right investor to leave a lasting legacy. We are already in discussion with a number of potential investors and would encourage any other interested party to contact us without delay."
    Mark Chapman, chief engineer, Project Bloodhound, said: "Bloodhound has had enormous success in creating the world’s most advanced land vehicle.
    "As we now move out of the R&D phase and into the operational phase of the project, we recognise that we need a different approach to funding.
    "This project is built around the most successful team in the history of Land Speed Racing, and with the right support we have no doubt that the project will achieve its aims and could be racing for the record in as little as ten months"



    https://www.insidermedia.com/insider...xpqV3aRZ0fj4nE

  6. #56
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    Looks pretty basic


  7. #57
    Thailand Expat VocalNeal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ratchaburi View Post
    at a specially built, 18km long, 1,500m wide race track at Hakskeen Pan in the deserts of the Northern Cape of South Africa.
    Locals in the North Cape welcomed the delay as it gives them more time to construct and open trackside stalls.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobo746 View Post
    Looks pretty basic

    These a lot of thing missing there BoBo I can see the front disc's brakes but no calipers & no parachute cans at the back of the car.
    So he won't be stopping in a hurry.

  9. #59
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    They have time to build a fence around the track.

  10. #60
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    Spirit Of Australia 2 Reaches 218 MPH In Testing



    Last weekend’s test session of the 25-foot-long, turbine engine/jet-powered Spirit of Australia 2 boat designed to break the water speed record of 317 mph went well and showed progress. What follows is a day by-day-day look at the testing on the waters of Blowering Lake Dam in New South Wales, Australia, the site where the existing water-speed record was established in 1978.
    Saturday, Sept. 1
    It was a beautiful, still morning down at Blowering Dam on the majestic Tumut River about five hours south of Sydney Australia. Suddenly, you thought you were being invaded by the loudest jet plane you had ever heard. But it wasn’t a jet aircraft—it was a special boat built by the famous Warby family (father Ken set the current record, son David hopes to break it)—that shattered the peace. I have heard turbines in the United States in mighty offshore boats, but this? This was another degree of loud.
    Remember the first time you went to the drag strip and saw a pass by one of those Top Fuel dragster guys? I put this experience on the same level as that—pure goosebumps. The jet starting up simply was awesome.
    The boat was here to test out the latest modifications and get to a higher speed level than its last time out in Taree, another riverfront city about if hours North of Sydney. The team arrived Friday and had a successful fire-up of the engine on land. Then it was time to go over the boat and ensure that every bolt was tight and everything was ship shape for Saturday's text runs .




    Jet turbine power produces a sound like no other across the Blowering Dam waters.
    Morning dawned a little overcast and grey and with the threat of a few showers—it had rained the week before breaking the areas drought of two years—but with this rain the water behind the dam because full of debris so the rescue boats and team boats spent most of the morning pulling trees and logs out of the water to ensure the track was clear and ready for a run. The last thing you want to hit at 200-plus-mph in a mostly wooden boat timber boat is a log.
    The first run was delayed from 10 a.m. till noon so debris-clearing work could be done
    And then it happened.
    They craned Spirit of Australia 2 into the water and fired her up and wow, once again, goosebumps.
    Once the boat is in the water, the entire process for a run happens quickly. In short, the fire her up and let her fly. And it’s awesome to see—and to hear.
    The run to the south last a little more than 50 seconds and the boat reached almost 200 mph. But it was pulling to the left, so the crew fueled her up and made another pass from the other of the lake. This run was a little better but the boat was still pulling to the left, so they pulled it out of the water, adjusted the steering system, refueled and sent it out again. This time the Spirit Of Australia 2 reached 208.


    That progress was good news. The deteriorating water conditions were not. The lake had blown up a bit, and in this type of high-speed pursuit anything over a ripple on the water could make for a very dangerous situation.
    Sunday, Sept 2
    Sunday was overcast but still. The plan was to do two runs similar to those accomplished on Saturday. Once the course was cleared again and checked by the team, the boat was placed on the water and the first run was a go.
    The first run produced a top speed of 218 mph, but the boat was still pulling significantly to left. So the team pulled the boat out of the water checked the under of the hull.




    The Spirit of Australia 2 is a hungry beast in need of constant feeding.
    That turned out to be a wise decision because it appeared that the plate holding the ski fins had moved out of alignment thanks to the extreme water pressure created by running 218 mph—and they needed to be replaced. There also was a slight bit of damage to that must have come from the boat striking debris at high speed, so for the sake of safety the team decided to scrub the second run of the day.
    Even with a minor mechanical setback, there’s no way to see last weekend’s testing as anything but a great success. Now it’s time for the team to go back to its workshop and fabricate some new stainless-steel plates, repair the hull and get the Spirit of Australia 2 ready for display at the Australian Offshore Superboat Championships Oct. 13-14 at Lake Macquarie.



    https://speedonthewater.com/in-the-n...mph-in-testing

  11. #61
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  12. #62
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    That's from 2018.

    Video's better.


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