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Thread: STEW

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    STEW

    100 Best Rated Stews in the World - TasteAtlas

    SOME FINE EUROPEAN FAVOURITES IN SUBJECTIVE GLOBAL RANKING, INCLUDING CURRIES

    MY PICKS INC MATSAMAN, FEIJOADA A TRANSMONTANA


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    Stufat is a Romanian meat stew, typically made with lamb, chopped scallions, fresh green garlic, tomato paste, oil, and seasonings. This traditional dish is connected with the arrival of spring, the time when new plants and herbs are starting to grow.

    It is typically prepared around Easter festivities in Romania and in the Balkan region. Stufat is usually garnished with scallions and fresh green garlic and accompanied by roasted potatoes, a bowl of fresh salad, and a glass of wine.

    aFTER mORAVIA BEST gULASCH IS IN aUSTRIA

    Regarded as the Austrian answer to Hungarian-style goulash, Wiener saftgulasch is a hearty stew that consists of diced lean beef drenched in a thick, flavorful gravy. Although it has evolved from the Hungarian version of the dish, Austrian beef goulash is believed to be a gourmet delicacy of its own kind.

    It is usually prepared with beef (traditionally lean beef shank), onions, tomato paste, and lard, while the combination is typically flavored with vinegar, Hungarian paprika, bay leaves, marjoram, caraway, lemon zest, juniper berries, sugar, salt, and black pepper.
    What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch?

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    Carbonnade

    FLANDERS, CENTRAL EUROPE
    4.3










    Carbonnade is a traditional Belgian stew made with beef and dark beer. Often referred to as carbonade flamande or stoverij, it features simple ingredients, but results in a rich and hearty dish. Although beef is the main ingredient in carbonnade, the crucial element for the dish is traditional Belgian dark beer.

    It gives the dish certain sour and earthy flavors that perfectly complement the sweet onions and tender beef. Thyme, garlic, and bay leaves are added for extra flavor, while slices of mustard bread are sometimes added in order to thicken the sauce.

    In Ghent, the dish often contains kidneys and liver.

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    Moravian Goulash

    foodlover
    Feb. 27, 2011




    Ingredients

    Butter/Margarine 1/4 Cup (4 tbs)
    Thinly sliced onions 3 Cup (48 tbs)
    Paprika 4 Teaspoon
    Beef chuck 2 1/2 Pound , cut into 1 1/2
    Salt 2 1/2 Teaspoon
    Canned tomatoes 8 Ounce (1 Can)
    Dill pickles 1 Cup (16 tbs) , cut into bite

    Directions

    In large skillet, in hot butter, saute onions until golden; stir in paprika.
    Add beef; sprinkle with salt and brown well.
    Add tomatoes; cover; simmer over low heat 30 minutes.
    Add 3 cups water; simmer 1 hour longer or until meat is tender.
    Add pickles; cook 5 minutes.

    Recipe Summary

    Difficulty Level: Easy
    Cook Time: 40 Minutes

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    Gumbo


    LOUISIANA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    4.3











    There is nothing better to represent a true taste of New Orleans than gumbo, a filling soup that is usually prepared in large, black, iron pots. A cultural and gastronomical symbol of Louisiana, it can be based on seafood and okra with tomatoes, or on turkey and chicken with added ham, sausage, and poached oysters.

    Perhaps rabbit or a wild duck will be the main stars, accentuated in flavor by tasso ham. Regardless of its base, gumbo is always intensely fragrant and aromatic with onions, garlic, bay leaf, and thyme, its thick and rich liquids ladled into bowls with an accompaniment of steamed white rice.

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    Beef bourguignon


    BURGUNDY, WESTERN EUROPE
    4.4










    Beef bourguignon is a rich and complex stew originating from the region of Burgundy in France. The star of the dish is a robust red Burgundy wine, which is used to soften and tenderize tough cuts of Charolais beef, along with savory additions such as onions, garlic, thyme, carrots, potatoes, mushrooms, and sometimes a few strips of dried orange peel to make the flavors even richer.

    The ingredients are simmered for a long time until the meat is completely soft and succulent, and all the juices have blended into a hearty, dark sauce. Some say that the dish tastes even better after it has been refrigerated for 24 hours and then reheated.

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    Gulš


    CZECH REPUBLIC and one more country
    4.4










    Traditional gulš is a hearty meat stew served with a dark red sauce that is heavily seasoned with paprika. Through history, this dish with Hungarian origins has become one of the most common meals in the Czech Republic and Slovakia.

    The two countries have created their unique version, slightly different from the original. It usually consists of beef, pork, or game meat, browned and simmered alongside onions for hours until the broth thickens. There are numerous varieties of this rustic dish, including the ones with different meat cuts, thicker and thinner broth types, potatoes, caraway seeds, marjoram, and even sausages and mushrooms.

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    Vietnamese Beef Stew (B kho)


    VIETNAM
    4.7










    B kho is a popular Vietnamese beef stew that can be consumed on its own or accompanied by a baguette on the side. It can also be served over noodles, and it is customary to serve a variety fresh herbs on the side. The dish includes ingredients such as diced beef, carrots, lemongrass, cinnamon, chili, pepper, garlic, and shallots, all of them simmered in a spicy and aromatic broth.

    The origins of b kho are still a mystery, although it is believed that the dish has many influences, from both the East and the West. In rural areas of Vietnam, the stew is usually much spicier than in urban areas. It is traditionally consumed for breakfast, garnished with chopped green onions, coriander, and onions.

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    Traditional Irish Stew












    Prep:20 mins
    Cook:2 hrs 20 mins
    Total:2 hrs 40 mins

    Servings:4 servings)




    SAVE RECIPENothing is more warming and filling than a delicious bowl of Irish stew, a popular dish from Ireland and loved the world over. It was traditionally made with mutton (sheep), but it is now often made with the easier-to-find lamb. Either meat will make a delicious, hearty stew.


    Controversy reigns over whether adding vegetables other than potatoes makes the perfect Irish stew, but the choice is yours. Adding onions, leeks, carrots, and cabbage does add extra flavor and nutrition to the stew and means that little else is needed to make it a meal.


    Though a hugely popular dish on St Patrick's Day, it's far too good to reserve for a few days a year—eat it when you want something comforting and warming. Serve with crusty bread to soak up all of the delicious sauce.






















    A Note From Our Recipe Tester


    Ingredients

    • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided
    • 1 pound lamb cutlets or mutton (bones removed, cut into 2-inch/5-centimeter chunks), divided
    • 2 pounds potatoes (peeled and cut into quarters), divided
    • 1 cup roughly chopped carrots, divided
    • 1 cup roughly chopped onion, divided
    • 1 cup finely sliced leeks, cleaned and divided
    • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
    • 3 cups dark beef stock (1 1/2 pints)
    • 2 or 3 cabbage leaves, thinly sliced, optional
    • Salt, to taste
    • Pepper, to taste







    1. Gather the ingredients. Preheat the oven to 350 F/180 C/Gas Mark 4.




    2. In a large frying pan, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil until hot but not smoking. Add half of the lamb pieces and brown all over by turning in the hot oil.




    3. Remove the lamb pieces with tongs and place them in a Dutch oven or ovenproof stockpot.




    4. Cover with half of the potatoes, half of the carrots, half of the onion, and half of the leeks.




    5. Add the remaining oil to the frying pan and heat. Add the remaining lamb and brown all over as before and add to the Dutch oven.



    6. Cover with the remaining potatoes, remaining onion, remaining leeks, and remaining carrots.



    7. Add the flour to the still-hot frying pan and stir really well to soak up any fat and juices. Cook over low heat for 3 minutes.



    8. Add the stock a ladle at a time and mix until you have a thick, lump-free sauce. You will not add all of the stock.



    9. Pour this sauce over the lamb and vegetables.



    10. Add the remaining stock to the Dutch oven, cover with a tight-fitting lid, and cook in the preheated oven for 1 hour.



    11. Add the cabbage (if using), replace the lid, and cook for another hour. Check from time to time to make sure the stock hasn't reduced too much. If it has, add a little boiling water. The meat and vegetables should always be covered in liquid. If the sauce is too runny at the end, you can always cook the stew a little longer with the lid removed.

    12. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Serve piping hot and enjoy.



    How to Store

    Like all stews and casseroles, this Irish stew tastes just as good, if not better, the next day. It will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to three days.

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    Like many dishes, stews definitely benefit from being in a fridge until the next day after cooking. This is a beef bourguignon I'd made a few months ago.


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    Quote Originally Posted by PAG View Post
    This is a beef bourguignon I'd made a few months ago.
    Oh, that looks so good!

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    Inspired by this thread, I went through the vegetable drawer of the fridge to what needed to be used up. A couple of pepper, red and yellow, had to be used, but rather than stuffing them, defrosted some pork mince, diced up the peppers and some onions, carrots, tin of tomatoes and tomato puree, some red wine and pork stock to make a stew with no name. As it was bubbling away, rush of blood to the head and made some dumplings. This stew is for the freezer, so checked that you can freeze dumplings (you can).

    Making the dumplings is straight forward, rubbing flour and butter together to make what is similar to breadcrumbs.



    Add a couple of spoons of cold water to make a dough, then roll into balls.



    The stew is just about ready.



    They go on top of the stew with the lid on for 20 minutes.



    Look OK.



    All four meals in boxes for the freezer.


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    whilst love most stews this listing is bollocks
    green curry better than yellow curry?
    no rendang?
    Cous-cous is a stew?
    no Lobskause?

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    No beef and guiness, Irish stew or any hotpots or suet dumplings... and the only Brit entry is tikka fukkin masala


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    I wrest ewe in the name of the slaw, jeez mary and lulu i did post the irish with guinness recipe for those with Hibernians inclinations, come Wedgy post up your fave tripe, no negative vibes on my thrisrstday pleez.

    Lancashire Hot Pot, Khao Soy whatever takes your fancy Todmorden todgers ragout, Badger Curry, Glasgow gash Gulash up 2 u

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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg Dingle View Post
    No beef and guiness, Irish stew or any hotpots or suet dumplings... and the only Brit entry is tikka fukkin masala

    Yer pm ,s a wobbly now dill. It was only a matter of time before tikka masala became the national dish

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    The Chicken Balti is far superior

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    Don't forget the Tarka dahl. it's like the other dahls but a little "otter

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    Quote Originally Posted by PAG View Post
    Making the dumplings is straight forward, rubbing flour and butter together to make what is similar to breadcrumbs.
    They look okay PAG, but I have to say I have only ever made dumplings with suet and flour rather than butter. Always keep the Atora ready for suet dumplings and suet puddings.

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    Another quality British emission off that top 100...



    Wish I'd have bought some prawn crackers now

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    You forgot the caption you having a beer next TO the dog's dinner?

    'quality British emission' NOTE TO SELF AIR FRESHENER WHEN REG VISITS

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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    They look okay PAG, but I have to say I have only ever made dumplings with suet and flour rather than butter. Always keep the Atora ready for suet dumplings and suet puddings.

    I cannot suet here so the idea that I can make dumplings with flour instead is indeed welcome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by david44 View Post
    Gumbo


    LOUISIANA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    4.3











    There is nothing better to represent a true taste of New Orleans than gumbo, a filling soup that is usually prepared in large, black, iron pots. A cultural and gastronomical symbol of Louisiana, it can be based on seafood and okra with tomatoes, or on turkey and chicken with added ham, sausage, and poached oysters.

    Perhaps rabbit or a wild duck will be the main stars, accentuated in flavor by tasso ham. Regardless of its base, gumbo is always intensely fragrant and aromatic with onions, garlic, bay leaf, and thyme, its thick and rich liquids ladled into bowls with an accompaniment of steamed white rice.
    This Gumbo looks interesting, on my to concoct list!

    I just need to pick up some fresh road kill this week, maybe a pheasant or a fox or maybe a couple of squirrels.

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