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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    While we're about it, what's a ball park percentage difference in salaries between Western teachers and Filipino teachers? There seem to be less and less Western teachers at this school and more and more Filipino, and my daughter now speaks with a broad Filipino accent.
    In Isan government schools a qualified Filipino teacher (B.Ed., if you believe the paperwork) gets about B20K per month, paid for 11 months. At the same school, a Native English Speaker TEFLer gets about B30K, plus or minus, also 11 months, depends on the school. At a private school the Western teachers should also be B.Ed. qualified, which would merit a much higher salary.

  2. #52
    Thailand Expat TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post

    While we're about it, what's a ball park percentage difference in salaries between Western teachers and Filipino teachers?
    Varies a lot, depending on school and country.

    Usually around on a salary around 50% - 65% lower.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    ^^Hard to generalise, but I'd say 30-50%.
    bet me to it.

    QUOTE=aging one;4106032]At a top tier International school in Bangkok you will find no Filipino teachers at all.[/QUOTE]

    Yes and no. Which is a shame, considering that Indian, Fillipino, Taiwanese teachers can be just as good or better than any western/white faced teacher.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyrille View Post
    As we all know anyway, nationality is a very blunt instrument for deciding what salary a teacher is worth.
    And rather inequitable and unjust.

  3. #53
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    Filipinos are willing to work for lower pay - as seen from the above reports.

    The Filipino teachers may not have the accent you want, but they are well-trained. Most have been teaching for years, and are licensed teachers and/or have post-graduate degrees. Generally not pedos or drunkards.

    Accdg to BLD when I met him, most of his sons' teachers at the international school in Vientiane were also Filipinos. (Their family has relocated to Oz.)

  4. #54
    Thailand Expat TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by katie23 View Post
    Filipinos are willing to work for lower pay - as seen from the above reports.
    Willing does not mean fair, though.

  5. #55
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    ^^
    Accents are important, Katie, having paid good money for an 'English' course that's what I want my child to receive, not American-, Indian-, Russian-, or as today Belgian-, and last week Scottish-English which frankly I had difficulty understanding.

    And I do cringe/correct him when he breaks into an American accent.

  6. #56
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    I guess my point about the Filipino teachers wasn't about the quality of their teaching... the ones my daughter has had have been excellent. My point was that when my daughter enrolled at the school there were very few Filipinos, and now there are lots, having replaced a lot of Western teachers. The school fees having been going up a lot, year on year, while the increasing use of Filipino teachers is a huge cost saving for the school.

    Just now my daughter has a Western (Aussie) English teacher, a Singaporean Maths teacher, a Thai Thai teacher and a Chinese Chinese teacher. All the rest are Filipino.

    Is it fair that Filipino teachers get paid so much less? I don't know, but that's just life. When I work offshore we use a lot of Filipinos as deckhands, stewards and for catering and I'm sure they are working for a fraction of the wages of Norwegians they replaced, and they work much longer trips. They do an equally good job (in catering a lot better in my opinion), but if they weren't cheaper they wouldn't be there.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    ^^
    Accents are important, Katie, having paid good money for an 'English' course that's what I want my child to receive, not American-, Indian-, Russian-, or as today Belgian-, and last week Scottish-English which frankly I had difficulty understanding.

    And I do cringe/correct him when he breaks into an American accent.
    My daughter keeps using American words; cookie instead of biscuit, candy instead of sweets, etc. Every time she says one I give her a punishment of having to say five American words and their (proper!) English equivalent.

    But in all seriousness, my daughter's curriculum is UK, and there have been constant issues with American versus English spelling and it has been very confusing for the kids. The school initially said it doesn't matter, so long as it's consistent, but a young kid doesn't understand the concept of the difference between English UK and English American spelling. Now it is supposed to be English UK throughout, yet my daughter is still bringing books back with American spelling. I don't know if this matters or not, but my understanding is that marks will be lost by using American spelling in a UK curriculum.

  8. #58
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    the problem is not their nationality, but their accent

    do you want kids to speak like Philipino or Indians? don't think so, even if they might have better teaching at the end

  9. #59
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    @jabir - re: accents, you could teach your kids your preferred accent (US/ UK), I think. It's also important to learn grammar, vocabulary, etc. I've listened to some call center agents here. They have (are taught) American or neutral accents, but some have poor grammar. I think both are important - accent and grammar. I can fake a US accent when I want to, due to Hollywood movies.

    @mendip - yes, I've seen that you work in the oil industry and there are loads of Filipinos on cargo ships, oil tankers, cruise ships, etc. I know of mariners who work for Maersk or Swedish shipping lines. I don't know if their pay is equal to their Scandy counterparts - most likely not. Is it fair? Probably not. But Filipinos (or Indians, Bangladeshi, Myanmar, Indonesian nationals) are willing to accept lower pay & sacrifice living conditions (e.g. 10 ppl in a room) just to be able to send $$ to their families.

    Anyway... I'm not blind to my country's faults or weaknesses, nor am I butt-hurt. I've lived in farangland, travelled to several countries and have seen more of world than my little island.

    And yes, I agree that in some situations, accents are important. Sometimes, even surnames are important too. I've had an ex-colleague (who migrated to NZ) tell me that there are many Asians who changed their surnames/ whole names into Western-sounding names so that they'll be more favored in job searches. Is that fair? It's not, but that's the way in that part of the world.

    @dragonfly - it's Filipino/ Filipina with an F, not Ph. Cheers!

  10. #60
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    Accents are important, Katie, having paid good money for an 'English' course that's what I want my child to receive, not American-, Indian-, Russian-, or as today Belgian-
    Look on the bright side - as of today, the only way is up.

  11. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    My daughter keeps using American words; cookie instead of biscuit, candy instead of sweets, etc. Every time she says one I give her a punishment of having to say five American words and their (proper!) English equivalent.

    But in all seriousness, my daughter's curriculum is UK, and there have been constant issues with American versus English spelling and it has been very confusing for the kids. The school initially said it doesn't matter, so long as it's consistent, but a young kid doesn't understand the concept of the difference between English UK and English American spelling. Now it is supposed to be English UK throughout, yet my daughter is still bringing books back with American spelling. I don't know if this matters or not, but my understanding is that marks will be lost by using American spelling in a UK curriculum.
    I am surprised at how the Brits love their accent. I would say in general Americans dont care about accents at all. Spelling should not be taken seriously in my opinion, theater, theatre, color colour, center centre. I would simply point out there are two ways to spell the word, chose the one you prefer.

    My kids went to Thai schools all the way up to high school, then entered the Harrow School with the British curriculum just in time for IGCSE's. Upon entering they were the butt of many a joke with their American accents, but really did not care. As for spelling that Mendip is worried about Harrow accepted either spelling, the first two years they always used the American spelling, but the last two would switch back and forth.

    So I think worry about the quality of the education rather than the accent. I was fully prepared to have my kids coming out with a British accent but it did not happen. Certain words yes they pronounce British. The one thing they did pick up was taking the piss out of someone. I was usually their target.

    But I sure am glad I put them in the British system. Graduated with honors, easily accepted to great universities, graduated with honors and now gainfully employed, living in California and very happy.

  12. #62
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    ^ I don't know why UK versus American spelling matters so much to me, but it just does. Maybe I should accept that my daughter is not so much a Brit but more 'international'.

    I know it does my daughter's head in. On the way home from school, for example, she'll ask to stop for candy, and I'll say, how can we... there's no such thing. She'll roll her eyes and ask to stop for sweets.

    But I have instilled in her a fine sense of sarcasm... she can take the piss out of many adults without them even knowing it. Maybe I'm concentrating on the wrong things?

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    But I have instilled in her a fine sense of sarcasm... she can take the piss out of many adults without them even knowing it. Maybe I'm concentrating on the wrong things?
    You have to think international as that is what she is. I often forget my kids are half Thai, until they get going full speed in Thai with their mom. Enjoy mate, as I have said it goes by way way too fast..

  14. #64
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Your relationship with your daughter is clearly something to treasure, Mendip.

    As long as she doesn't ask you to stop for balut on the way home I wouldn't worry too much.

  15. #65
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    ^ I had to look that up...

    I may have mentioned that we keep chickens and they run with a cockerel, so all of our eggs are fertile. We used to keep the eggs out on the kitchen worktop (counter), until a few years ago, around this time of year, we found that they'd started to develop into chicks. Not a nice start to the day when you break a few eggs into a bowl to make an omelette. The God-awful heat through April and May was enough to start the eggs incubating.

    Thankfully my daughter was as repulsed as I was.

  16. #66
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    ^your daughter is showing her UK side. If she were Thai (or Viet, Lao, Filipino), she would eat balut. I've eaten chicken & duck baluts since childhood.

    On a lighter note - this duck is now one month old, and it was named "Cobibe". "Bibe" is Tagalog for duck. Cobibe = covid + bibe. The story is that the woman bought a fertilized egg, with the intention to boil it at home. She did some chores and forgot about the egg. A few days later, she heard "chick" sounds - the egg had hatched into a duckling. Cobibe is now a pet of the family.



    Btw, still on covid - there have been babies born during this period with the names Covid Rose (girl) and Covid Bryant! (not kidding - was featured in local news) Filipinos take the piss in that way.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by katie23 View Post
    Covid Bryant!


    Poor kid.

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by aging one View Post
    . Graduated with honors.
    Honours.

    555.


    But i do have to say that a filipino accent drives me into a homicidal rage. Soirrre.....

  19. #69
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    ^it's ok, nid. I don't like the Essex, Cockney, Midlands, Manc or Geordie accents, so no harm done.

    Ooh... Loo-tenant or lef-tenant (lieutenant)? Zehb-ra or zeeb-ra (zebra)? (opening a can of worms here, lol)

    Btw, Cobibe the duck & baby Covid Bryant are real stories - got a few greens for that post.

    Just re: Filipinos and names, a priest once said during his sermon that in the 90s, he was baptising babies named Michael Jordan Cruz, Michael Jordan Santos, etc. Nowadays, it's LeBron James Cruz, Kobe Bryant Santos, Stephen Curry Martinez, etc. Then a month ago, there's baby Covid Bryant!

    Cheers all!

  20. #70
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    ^ I thought of naming our new puppy 'Covid' as she just turned up a few weeks ago during the lockdown... but it just didn't seem right.

  21. #71
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    It's not just the accent; when the school saves a few baht by having Thais compile an English test the results can be amusing at the surface but infuriating beneath, esp for those paying extras for an English course.

    Last week one of the questions posed was, quote, "If the year is 2020, what will it be?"
    A1: 2019
    A2: 2020
    A3: 2021
    A4: 2022

    Who answered 2021 with a mental pat on the back?

    If this was posed correctly, ie followed by 'next', one should still recoil at the academic expectations of any teacher posing it to 8 year old luk kreungs, or ftm even Thai 8 year olds at a gov school. But that's not the point. Sure we know what the teacher meant, but kids don't, and my education on the day was courtesy of an 8 year old whose curiosity and ability to think outside of the box has not yet been bleached away by the abysmal Thai education system: 'Dad it will be 2020 till the end of the year, no?'

    I supported him and 2020 we plumped for, although I knew it would be marked wrong, and when it was I fired off a pm to the teacher that rightfully belongs in the Daily Moan thread.

    Next day, same teacher, I could not understand three of the set of 10 questions no matter how I played with the possible interpretations, one regarding the Thai Constitution I had to google, while two of the others were ambiguous leading to more than one of the 4 possible answers. This time I posted my unadulterated thoughts on the site for all to see, to the effect that my son will not be participating in future English tests that are not compiled by an English speaking teacher.

  22. #72
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jabir View Post
    I posted my unadulterated thoughts on the site for all to see
    At least some punishment was meted out, then.

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    ^ I thought of naming our new puppy 'Covid' as she just turned up a few weeks ago during the lockdown... but it just didn't seem right.
    When I was a kid, our neighbors named their 1st dog Gorby, younger dog was called Boris - after Gorbachev & Boris Yeltsin.

    I think naming a pet after a famous event/ person is OK. It would always remind you of that particular time. You could name the dog Coby/ Kobe/ Koby. Cheers!

  24. #74
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    ^ 'Coco' it was!

  25. #75
    The Fool on the Hill bowie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mendip View Post
    'Coco'

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