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  1. #1
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    rawlins's Avatar
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    What time is bedtime?

    What time do you put your kids to bed at?

    We aim for 8 but it is often after 9 by the time she is asleep... Some new research is stating the obvious in that if your kids bedtime varies too much it will hinder their academic progress.

    A relative would put his kids to bed at 6 and only allowed 20 minutes of kids TV per day and it had to be Kids TV that was from his era... Bagpuss and the like... I don't believe in being that strict and allow some movies and educational kids TV.

    Do Thais let their kids rule them too much?... Maybe that is another thread.

  2. #2
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    Happy As Larry's Avatar
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    Mine (3.5 & 8) go up to bed at 8pm almost on the dot every week night . By the time they have showered, changed etc it is about 8.30 by the time they are asleep.
    Everybody up at 06.00 in the morning

    The baby I put to bed about an hour earlier.

  3. #3
    I am in Jail
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    We prefer 8ish but that never happens so we aim for 9ish and get there around 9.30.

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat Pragmatic's Avatar
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    Bed 8pm. Up 6am. Off to school 7-7.15. Home 5.15. At week-ends bedtime is 8-8.30.

    Quote Originally Posted by rawlins
    Do Thais let their kids rule them too much?
    It's not so much that Thais letting their kids rule them. It's more to the effect that Thais can't be bothered to discipline their children. Hence why you see Thai parents rewarding bad behavior. Easier to give a misbehaving child an icecream than chastise them.

  5. #5
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    LEGENDARY's Avatar
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    My wife and I do not have our offspring living with us, so it's just her 'n me. We eat early, generally around four o'clock in the afternoon, after working on the land. This gives us time to digest our food, kick back with a beer, ab nam and get to bed around 7pm. This way we also stay ahead of the mosquitoes... up around 5am to prepare khao nio and get ready to tak baht. My wife likes a lot of sleep time. I generally find myself awake during portions of the night, especially when it rains.
    MALCOLM GAULT-WILLIAMS
    Nong Bua Lamphu countryside, Isaan

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat poorfalang's Avatar
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    my kids are 6 and 3
    girls and boy off to bed at 8-8.30 and alarm goes off at 6 am,
    get pickup for school at 7 and back at home a 16.45.
    weekend is the same but they tend to wake up by themselves, no alarm, at the same time, strange that is,
    Sorry about me horrible speling

  7. #7
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    Mine's 7. If he isn't asleep by 8:30 he can't wake up in time to do the morning routine and catch the 7:30 bus. There also seems to be some sort of point of no return whereby if he isn't asleep between 8:30 and 9 he becomes strangely invigorated and won't sleep.
    “You can lead a horticulture but you can’t make her think.” Dorothy Parker

  8. #8
    loob lor geezer
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    Found this :

    Bedtime routine isn’t the only way to rear smart children

    A rigid bedtime schedule is not the sole route to clever kids. Spontaneity develops intellect, too

    Anna Maxted, with Conrad (left), Casper and Oscar Photo: Clara Molden

    By Anna Maxted

    6:00AM BST 10 Jul 2013



    Last night, at 8.30pm, the six-year-old was playing basketball in the park with his baseball cap jammed backwards on his head. I gratefully noted that no other mothers bore witness to my slack parenting as they were presumably at home, relaxing with a glass of wine, while their clever little darlings snored upstairs.

    Our bedtime routine – thanks to the long, light evenings and disruptive influence of older brothers – has crumbled from being a brisk military-style operation (Codename: Processing The Kids) into a shambolic free-for-all, with a thousand excuses for wakefulness ranging from hay fever and cricket matches, to forgotten but urgent homework, sudden-onset 99 per cent plausible ailments and sobbing hysteria because the cat isn’t asleep on one’s bed.

    This slide into anarchy would be a minor inconvenience, merely blacking out more of the parental arrow-slit window of leisure time, were it not for the ghastly news from researchers at University College London who have discovered that irregular bedtimes at an early age have a negative impact on children’s intelligence.

    They studied more than 11,000 children, whose parents were questioned on the night-time routine when their offspring were three, five and seven. Youngsters whose bedtimes were unscheduled had disrupted circadian rhythms and suffered sleep deprivation, thus limiting the brain’s ability to absorb and retain information.

    Guiltily, I recall that when my six-year-old’s teacher introduced a basic maths concept to the class, he cried: “Miss Farrar, you’re blowing my mind!” I’m forced to admit that wildly zigzagging bedtimes have caused my children cognitive blips. The eight-year-old recently identified a pigeon on our balcony as a chicken, and Oscar, 11, forgot his cousin’s name. But the most glaring deterioration is in mood: if any child retires 60 minutes later than is ideal, the following day brings tears over such disasters as a “too squashy” satsuma, an upsurge in fighting and explosions of “I hate you!”

    Scouring the report, I pray that exhaustion-induced stupidity is reversible – alas, it looks unlikely. Aged seven, the children were tested on reading, maths and spatial awareness. Those with an irregular bedtime at the age of three performed relatively poorly in all tests, suggesting their intellectual development had been stunted at a critical period.

    Lead researcher Professor Yvonne Kelly concluded in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health: “Relations between inconsistent bedtimes […] may have knock-on effects for health and broader social outcomes throughout the life course.” Nothing too serious, then.
    However, searching the data for loopholes, I find that varying bedtimes aged five had no negative effect on later intelligence. And – here’s a crumb of comfort to a mother of boys (considered by mothers of girls to be on a par with dogs), young ladies whose bedtimes were not prescribed aged seven scored lower in all aspects of intellect tested, while the terriers/gentlemen emerged from late nights unscathed.
    This research is important, but to the majority of parents the gist of it can hardly be news. We all have anecdotal evidence of exhaustion rendering the juvenile brain witless (let alone the adult one). Few parents of three-year-olds have greater priorities than enforcing a prompt bed-time. But children aren’t robots. Despite a bath and story, our middle child tottered downstairs every night until he was five – and us getting purple in the face about it simply prolonged the agony.
    Instead, we spent hours spying on the family of foxes who, in the hot summer months, sprawled in our road cooling themselves, or, more prosaically, watching In the Night Garden. At some ungodly hour, sir would conk out, but in the marital bed. It wasn’t what I’d envisaged, but then, parenthood rarely is.
    In a perfect world, my children would be unconscious by 8pm. In real life, they’re knocking about on a cricket pitch – and when they come home, they expect a story. Reading can eat into sleeping time, with no ill effects. The six-year-old was so enchanted by The Secret Garden, he took a scrap of paper to school on which he’d scrawled “th’art”. “It means 'you are’ in Yorkshire,” he told Miss Farrar (whose mind, in turn, was blown).
    I feel passionately about the intelligence benefits of evenings in a field, crowned by a pink and gold sunset and skeins of cloud in a prairie sky. It’s the same when the children snuggle with their father in front of a documentary on restoring cars.
    Good, solid sleep is crucial to brain plasticity, but rigid routine is not the sole route to smart children. Spontaneity also develops the intellect. As the bleary-eyed eight-year-old remarked, after joyously playing out late with friends: “If we didn’t have imagination, we’d still be in caveman times.”



    Bedtime routine isn’t the only way to rear smart children - Telegraph

  9. #9
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    Lovely article, but it's all anecdotal and short on evidence.

  10. #10
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    My daughters (12 + 17 this year) head to bed at 8.00pm, sleep around 8.45pm, get up at 5.00am and out to school by 6.00am.

  11. #11
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    Interesting thread this one.

    I have a 7,6 and 2 y.o. They are in bed by 8pm and asleep by 8.30pm. They are up at 7.30 at the earliest but normally 8am. (I homeschool). My 2 y.o has a 3 hour afternoon nap.

    "Do Thais let their kids rule them too much?" Oh my word - yes they do!
    News is what someone, somewhere is trying to suppress - everything else is just advertising.

  12. #12
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    I start getting my daughter (3) ready for bed at 7pm. By the time she has taken her medicine and brushed her teeth it's usually 730 and she crashes out as soon as she lays down. Up at 630 for school.

    Works out great for us. Then again our daughter is an angel

  13. #13
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    My little one (6) goes in the shower at 8pm and is alseep by 8.20.

    The eldest lad (13) goes to bed about 8.30. If he wants to stay up a bit later (to finish watching a movie for example) then it's never a problem. He's usually sparko by 9pm.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rawlins
    Do Thais let their kids rule them too much?
    Without doubt. In general, Thais are as good at parenting as they are at driving cars.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by rawlins
    Do Thais let their kids rule them too much?
    Without doubt. In general, Thais are as good at parenting as they are at driving cars.
    I must agree. Seems that befriending the children is more important that raising them. A Thai niece of mine is never told no... Even is she is behaving like a Neanderthal the parents just smile and adore from afar as if the child can't be disciplined.
    The child could take the food out of another kids moths and the parents would excuse the behavior because their child was "hungry" or just being a "child"

    Scary to think how the previous generation was brought up.

  16. #16
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    I have seen this first hand to ,, a dear friends night ruined by some shitty little kid of her sister , allowed to be the complete centre of attraction , ruining the night with his iPad war game running at full volume so as no one but no one could talk .

    When I questioned my wife about this later on I was told ,, " Oh they love him sooo mutt " ,,,,,,,,, yeah right so they might , my Dad would have ,, well lets put it this way , I wouldnt have dared
    I'm proud of my 38" waist , also proud I have never done drugs

  17. #17
    Member youneverknow's Avatar
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    8-9:30 maybe 10 some odd nights. My daughter usually goes to bed around 8:30 lately.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marmite the Dog View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by rawlins
    Do Thais let their kids rule them too much?
    Without doubt. In general, Thais are as good at parenting as they are at driving cars.
    That "may" be true but my anecdotal evidence is that see much worse behavior in the west than here.
    I walked past the local shop last night, were a there were a bunch of "Hoodies" gathered.

    In the west you would just as likely to receive derogatory abuse, here I got merely a pleasant and respectful greeting, as befitting my seniority.
    There can’t be good living where there is not good drinking

  19. #19
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    my nearly 4 year old goes to bed around 8, and has done for years and years

    there are the occasional late nights when we take her out with us to a restaurant, then she is in bed by around 9.30

    or if there is a special festival going on

    she is pretty good at going to bed, but she always emerges a couple of times for a pee or a glass of water etc, so it is around 8.30 before she really sleeps
    I have reported your post

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