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  1. #51
    Member keekwai's Avatar
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    ^After that

  2. #52
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    Pol the Pot's Avatar
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    Quite right. And they had it coming.

  3. #53
    Member keekwai's Avatar
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    Just to clarify for anyone .. The Khmer Empire covered everything from todays Cambodia, Laos, Thailand .. Little bits of Myanmar, Malaysia and Vietnam. That was about 1000 odd years ago. Then it began recede and Siam began to expand.

    Then over the past 200-300 odd years it gradually lost big chunks here and there.
    You can use logic to justify anything. That's its power. It’s also its flaw.

  4. #54
    Member keekwai's Avatar
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    Delete this one too!
    Last edited by keekwai; 15-06-2012 at 09:08 PM.

  5. #55
    I am in Jail

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    was'nt it the frenchies who took Koh mak from the thais

  6. #56
    Thailand Expat prawnograph's Avatar
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    an old thread, and an older topic

    Louis Benjamin Jacquet
    Born February 1, 1869, Mollans, France
    Died near Chanthaburi, February 1899



    In 1893, Jacquet reengaged for five years at Blida in the 4th Marine Infantry Regiment. September 1893 he left Toulon, for Cochinchina, to join the troops of the 11th Colonial who constitute the main body of the occupation troops in Chanthaburi, Siam.

    In October 1898, his time over, he decided not to re-sign.. instead chose to provide supplies to the barracks of 300-400 French and Annamite soldiers in this isolated region. In February 1899 Jacquet left Chanthaburi to set up an operation to travel to Battambang via the direct track through the forest and the Cardamom mountains. There, acquire a small herd of live cattle, and bring them back to Chanthaburi, where beef cannot be found, also to bring back blue sapphires from Païlin to resell for profit to the Chinese of Chanthaburi

    He was accompanied by his Siamese helper Leuan who was to take care of baggage and supplies. About halfway, they stopped to rest at the Thung Baan Chum Het sala, about 30 km from the city. There they quarrelled. They came to blows, and Leuan grabbed his rifle and killed Jacquet, presumably for the money he carried to pay for his planned purchases.

    There is no record of the terms of the trial or its conclusion. According to Siamese sources, Leuan was convicted and died soon after in prison from illness.

    This is the only violent death recorded throughout the fourteen years of occupation of the two regions of Chantaburi and Trat, by the French occupation forces.

    ....


    The last letter from Benjamin Jacquet to his parents, sent from Chanthaburi.

    “I am currently in Siam.
    I like it a lot in this country.
    I travel in the interior, in the forests, safely.
    Siamese are not bad.
    I am doing very well.
    I think I will succeed … ”.
    Last edited by prawnograph; 12-04-2020 at 03:52 PM. Reason: Typo

  7. #57
    Thailand Expat prawnograph's Avatar
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    Connection to previous post

    The record of burial of Louis-Benjamin Jacquet, written at the time by Marie Joseph Cuaz apostolic missionary in Chanthaburi; the body of the Jacquet was buried in the military cemetery of the French camp, which was on the right bank of the estuary of the river.
    The tomb has since disappeared.


    Marie-Joseph Cuaz (1862-1950) of the Missions Étrangères de Paris, arrived in Siam in November 1885 and was parish priest of Chanthaburi from 1886 to 1899.
    He then became the first bishop of Laos, until 1908.



    Reprints of his Siamese and Laotian books are available from Amazon etc

    ESSAI DE DICTIONNAIRE FRANÇAIS-SIAMOIS. Paperback – January 1, 1903
    by Marie Joseph Cuaz (Author)
    Publisher: Imprimerie De La Mission Catholique (1903)
    Last edited by prawnograph; 12-04-2020 at 02:18 PM.

  8. #58
    Thailand Expat prawnograph's Avatar
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    Monument plaque of remembrance for the French who died in the Paknam incident 1893, and (lower half) those who died during the occupation of Chanthaburi 1893-1905, unveiled November 2017 at the French Embassy in Bangkok.

    Note name of Benjamin Jacquet at lower right of plaque.
    Last edited by prawnograph; 12-04-2020 at 02:16 PM.

  9. #59
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    ^However the description next to the pictured plaque speaks first about names of 3 French marines killed during the Pak-Nam incident in 1893.

    Paknam incident

    The Paknam Incident was a military engagement fought during the Franco-Siamese War in July 1893. While sailing off Paknam on Siam's Chao Phraya River, three French ships violated Siamese territory and were fired warning shots by a Siamese fort and a force of gunboats. In the ensuing battle, France won and blockaded Bangkok, which ended the war.

    Paknam incident - Wikipedia

  10. #60
    Thailand Expat prawnograph's Avatar
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    ^ it wouldn't have looked as good of I'd cut it in half! Fully aware of the Paknam incident all related to their occupation of Chan and Trat same year
    Chanthaburi city has the provincial offices of National Archives - almost directly across the road from the Taksin military camp, on my 'one day' list to see what they would let me access. A test of my uni French from many years back, though it's better than my Thai...

  11. #61
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    ^Wondering whether the Pak-Nam incident is mentioned in Thai schools.
    (Provided that they ever teach something from the Thai history, as I have learned many times when speaking with educated Thais)

    As the incident is described, not only the French profited from the outcome. Also the English (even more than the French), so a more advanced war situation would be no good for their business in Siam...

    The French gunboats, together with Pavie, departed Bangkok on July 24 prior to the French imposing a blockade of the river from July 29 until August 3.[1]:273-275 In France, many were calling for a protectorate to be imposed upon Siam. But the events of July 13, followed by the blockade, which harmed British interests far more than French (British trade accounted for 93% of Siam exports[2]:121), alarmed the British, who put pressure on both the Siamese and French governments to reach a negotiated settlement.
    Paknam incident - Wikipedia

  12. #62
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    ^Wondering whether the Pak-Nam incident is mentioned in Thai schools.
    One would think not as it isn't flattering to Siam/Thailand

  13. #63
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    ^Wondering whether the Pak-Nam incident is mentioned in Thai schools.
    (Provided that they ever teach something from the Thai history, as I have learned many times when speaking with educated Thais)

    As the incident is described, not only the French profited from the outcome. Also the English (even more than the French), so a more advanced war situation would be no good for their business in Siam...


    Paknam incident - Wikipedia

    A side note to this period: might be enlightening to research [alternatively] Auguste Pavie, the French statesman and interloper, and his somewhat awkward relationship with Siam/close royals.

  14. #64
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    ^The a.m. Wiki states his part in the incident:
    The French commander, Captain Borey, did not receive a telegram of updated instructions from Paris to hold his position at the mouth of the river, as it was not received by the French consul Auguste Pavie until the following day. But Pavie did advise him of the Siamese stance and suggested he anchor off Koh Sichang and await further instructions. Borey was under pressure since his ships could only cross the bar at high tide and chose to follow his orders from Rear Admiral Edgar Humann in Saigon rather than Pavie's counsel.

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