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  1. #26
    Thailand Expat
    fishlocker's Avatar
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    It's all about the market. Market prices, fish market, goats shrimp and snakes.

    The bottom dropped out today. Down 600 and to think at one point I was up 22. Always second guessing when to jump.

    The bottom line is what do you feel comfortable with. How much do you need? Like their is a one size fits all pair of depends.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowie View Post
    Yea, but, in reality, the budget "food" category actually was combining the "food" and Misc" category's. Budgeting is a fairly difficult process in that, to correctly draw up a "future" budget you need to get a firm grip on your existing expenditures. To do that you need to journal your spending. Really is amazing to find out just "where" you actually are spending your cash.

    Surprise, surprise, surprise...

    and, in my case, that "miscellaneous" category did catch a slew of small necessities that added up to a good chunk of change.

    And, of course, for Teakdoorees, don't overlook the "sin tax" category(s) - usually more than one, eh?
    take on board all as bowie said,BUT my advice [35yrs] KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT,NOSE CLEAN AND ALWAYS PREPARE FOR THE UNEXPECTED,because there will be some.

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by bowie View Post
    Yea, but, in reality, the budget "food" category actually was combining the "food" and Misc" category's. Budgeting is a fairly difficult process in that, to correctly draw up a "future" budget you need to get a firm grip on your existing expenditures. To do that you need to journal your spending. Really is amazing to find out just "where" you actually are spending your cash.

    Surprise, surprise, surprise...

    and, in my case, that "miscellaneous" category did catch a slew of small necessities that added up to a good chunk of change.

    And, of course, for Teakdoorees, don't overlook the "sin tax" category(s) - usually more than one, eh?
    take on board all that bowie has said.
    after over 35yrs.my advice is,you can have a good living,BUT KEEP YOUR MOUTH SHUT,YOUR NOSE CLEAN AND ALWAYS BE PREPARED FOR THE UNEXPECTED AS THERE WILL BE SOME.

  4. #29
    Your local I.Q. Monitor
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandaloopy View Post
    If only there was some way to find out a near enough date of my expiry. I want a really over the top funeral- soak my body in Moet or something naff
    Try 20 year old scotch. At least you'll burn better.

  5. #30
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    Flashpoint 101?
    Life is a powder keg. Best stand far off and away when it blows up.
    Just sayen



    fish

  6. #31
    Thailand Expat
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    How much you need to take with you is a calculated number based on how long you will fly. How soon you will die ect.
    Last edited by fishlocker; 13-11-2018 at 10:47 AM.

  7. #32
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Some solid arguments for extending your working life as long as possible here.

  8. #33
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    ^ Just thinking the same.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter View Post
    ALWAYS PREPARE FOR THE UNEXPECTED,because there will be some.
    In all decisions, preparation in thought and deed wins the days, months and years ahead.

    Plus another 100% for the guaranteed stumbles along life's highways and byways.


  10. #35
    I'm in Jail

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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    Teaching in Mongolia must pay much better than I thought...

    Best I am likely to get is a quick splash with Sang Som....

    I does but life expectancy is low

  11. #36
    or TizYou?
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    The OECD says you need only 70 per cent of your pre-retirement income to be comfortable.

    I find this to be bullshit though.

    I currently spend about 40% of my salary, I don't expect my spending to nearly double when I retire.
    Probably the first couple of years after retirement there'll be some travelling that will be more expensive than just going to work. But really, the trips won't be any more frequent than I do already, just the duration of stays will be longer.

    As you then get older, travelling reduces and really the only expenses that will increase is health.

    My parents, mum 85 and dad 90, have spent all their superannuation and now just live on the Aus pension and a few small dividends from investments.

    They find it difficult to spend all of their pension.
    They just buy anything that they ever want.
    They hire people to come and clean their house every week.
    They hire a guy to come and mow the lawn every 2 weeks. (I think weekly in the summer)
    They hire a local gardening crew to look after the garden ( a 1/4 acre block in suburban Sydney)
    They no longer drive, so there's no car to maintain.

  12. #37
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    Yup....eventually being unable to dress oneself and go out results in further savings.

  13. #38
    Thailand Expat
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    Cloths? Another reason to flop on the sand by the waterfront.
    Who cares if the fry no longer find you fresh.

  14. #39
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    Yep. For me it is only the Sterling rate. I wish I had changed to USD 3 years ago...

  15. #40
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    Thanks, sound advice - maybe I need another contract somewhere to make doubly sure, just don't fancy it.

  16. #41
    R.I.P. Luigi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bowzer View Post
    in the Eastern Seaboard
    Roughly which area are you in?

    I researched retiring along there last year, but found the beaches past Sattahip to be rubbish tips. Which would really be the reason for it. Bang Saray looked okay, as did Sattahip, but decent schooling would mean daily commuting for the kid, which is something I want to avoid. Moving further North means moving into Dillinger Sexpat territory. Something I'd also like to avoid.

  17. #42
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    How do you plan to fund the visa/extension requirements...

    What about health insurance ?

  18. #43
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles View Post
    How do you plan to fund the visa/extension requirements...
    ...agree: Thai immigration has already determined how much a farang needs in retirement...they arrived at the appropriate figure, apparently, by asking a dead fetus or a nearby tree for the correct number...in my case, a B65K+ monthly transfer from the States satisfies the spirits...

  19. #44
    or TizYou?
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...agree: Thai immigration has already determined how much a farang needs in retirement.
    Strangely... they've also determined that 440K per annum is enough if you are married, but you'll need 800K if single...

  20. #45
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TizMe View Post
    Strangely
    ...the dead fetus hath spoken...

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by TizMe View Post
    Strangely... they've also determined that 440K per annum is enough if you are married, but you'll need 800K if single...
    Really? Surely the 800k is for retirement, single or married, where working is not allowed. The 400k is for a person married to a Thai and working is allowed (with a WP etc).

  22. #47
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    My input as I retired early,

    Your proposed monthly budget is really relative to what your expectations are. If you want to live easy and simply no issue at all. If you want to go out and travel and play a bit you will need to save for those trips but that's OK.

    I personally think people fail in retirement because they had no hobbies or life outside of work. Then they retire and go crazy, panic and think they need to work because they know nothing else. I read quite a bit before I retired from guys that failed and guys that succeeded. The ones that succeeded were not loaded with cash necessarily but were extremely active with numerous hobbies while they worked then when they retired they just got busier and dove into them more. I am in that boat. I am not flush with cash but man do I have a ton of hobbies, most do not cost any money. Just time. Every day is whatever I make it. I planned it where I have zero debt. Own a house here with my wife and our living costs are really minimal.

    Enjoy your retirement.

  23. #48
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neverna View Post
    Really? Surely the 800k is for retirement, single or married, where working is not allowed. The 400k is for a person married to a Thai and working is allowed (with a WP etc).
    Yep...
    Correct definitive.

  24. #49
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    JPPR2 has an important point. When my dad retired, he had nothing. Spiraled into an early death. Cancer took him, but he had lost the will to live years before that.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by nidhogg View Post
    JPPR2 has an important point. When my dad retired, he had nothing. Spiraled into an early death. Cancer took him, but he had lost the will to live years before that.
    It's quite common, sadly. People work their entire adult life to retire then get there and walk off a cliff. It is especially traumatic when one is forced into retirement.

    Before retiring one should ask themselves what they will do to have fun and stay busy? I think people focus waaaay too much about money. Don't get me wrong, it makes life easier and expands options but it shouldn't be an obsession. I enjoyed my working career for the most part and really love retirement now.

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