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  1. #1
    Member bretby's Avatar
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    Another Example Of Police Corruption

    This is a letter from this weeks Pattaya Mail.


    Corrupt so called police

    Editor;
    Within the past two days my family and I have been totally harassed by the thieves of the Nakon Sawan Police department! My wife and son were driving back from a visit to our farm in a little town called Lat Yao. During their return trip back to Pattaya where we have our home they were stopped by the Roadside Gang (Band of Thieves) and informed that our vehicle was under suspicion from Chonburi for drug dealing. This is a new truck that we bought back in February from Ford.
    They were asked to vacate the truck as police searched it and low and behold the crooks produced some type of drug that they said was (planted) in our truck. My son and my wife were both arrested and taken off to jail.
    After these so called police searched our truck and found our bank book and house and farm papers they naturally assumed that we were also money laundering. I am an American that has been in Thailand for 16 years married to a wonderful Thai woman and two beautiful adopted children. The strongest drugs that I take are aspirin, my wife will not even take that and both my children are as clean as a whistle. As far as the money laundering issue, I am an engineer that still works every day and I do earn a very high rate of pay that I have directly deposited into our joint account.
    Simply because I am a high earner our home is paid, our car is paid, as well as our farm. All I am trying to do is provide a comfortable surrounding for my family. I should not be punished by the local Gestapo of Nakon Sawan. In order for my family to be released the thieves requested 100,000 baht. Yes, this is direct theft because someone has enough intelligence to earn more than the Band of Thieves.
    We have hired a lawyer and some type of reprimand must be taken. I myself want their jobs and open apology as well as my 100,000 baht back. I am still working in Saudi Arabia and upon my return the thieves and I are not finished, something needs to be done to stop this kind of blatant theft. Any suggestions are welcomed.
    Corruption in Thailand, how can that be? I will forward this on to my local papers in the USA as well as the Bangkok Post. It is time for the people to wake up and stop taking the crap that is dealt out by the police. If the officers can’t do better to earn a living than steal from honest hard working people, then take off their uniform and put on a ski mask. At least one would know what they are dealing with up front!
    Name withheld

  2. #2
    better looking than Ned
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    Probably hear of a Americin drug dealer being shot next week,
    Bloody scum pigs.
    Could happen to any of us
    I am glad that German guy built a 10,000,000 baht home down the road from me in the village, I even thought of doing the joint over me self

  3. #3
    Dean
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    You would be better off taking the wife and children out of Thailand to the middle east for the duration of your career. Good luck.

  4. #4
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    Yea, That cop that murdered the Del Rio guy and shot the farang girl when he was off duty and drunk a year or so ago never missed a days work and the Canadians had their police and interpol involved, so I would be thinking of something else.
    There is nothing you can do about the RTP, not even HRM can do anything about them as they are a self regulated gang of organized crooks..
    Here is what the UN says about them.

    Thai police are best organized criminals
    By AWZAR THI
    Column: Rule of Lords
    Published: March 27, 2008



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    Hong Kong, China — According to the United Nations, the Royal Thai Police are organized criminals.
    That, at least, is the inference to be drawn from looking at its Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, which was adopted in 2001 and which defines an organized crime group as involving at least three people acting in concert over a period of time "with the aim of committing one or more serious crimes or offences… in order to obtain… a financial or other material benefit."
    It would be hard to overstate the extent to which Thailand's police fit this definition. A browse through a few newspapers of recent weeks alone reveals as much.
    In February there was the case of the border patrol unit that abducted and tortured people to extract money and force them to confess to narcotics charges. So far over 100 complaints have been lodged against it, the majority from persons serving jail terms, and also one policeman. Although the low-ranking officers involved have surrendered, investigators have reportedly said that there is no evidence to link their wrongdoing to their superiors.
    Then was the car scam, which came unstuck when a victim of theft went to police headquarters to file a complaint and found his vehicle sitting in the parking lot: not impounded, being used by personnel.
    The police had colluded with rental companies to steal perhaps over 1,000 new automobiles by fraud. So far, only a few of the cars have been recovered. Many will have been sold into Cambodia and Burma. The operation apparently stretched over a wide area and involved police from various units, including Special Branch and cyber crime. Senior officers have already sought to exonerate some, saying that they will face only internal, not criminal, inquiries. The hire company directors have been arrested.
    Similarly, 21 police forensics staff accused of taking money for the cost of formalin that was never administered have been let off the hook and three civilian employees blamed in their stead. Joking about this case, cartoonist Chai Rachawat wrote in the Thai Rath newspaper that it is anyhow better for police to steal from the dead than from the living: his picture depicts some skeletons standing in coffins and yelling as a policeman makes off with the loot.
    Aside from these incidents, police have been implicated in a number of recent killings: some execution-style, another in which a leading forensic scientist has said that their account of what happened does not match the evidence. Torture and other abuses meanwhile go on as normal.
    Thailand's police did not become an organized crime gang by accident. The modern force was from the beginning intended both as a criminal and political agency, monopolizing the drug trade and murdering or detaining opponents, including other police. It quickly became unstoppable as, historian Thak Chaloemtiara notes, while people whispered about its crimes "investigation was impossible, for the crimes were committed by the police themselves."
    Its heyday as an unsurpassed crime venture may have been in the 1950s, but until now the police force remains beyond the law and answerable unto itself. The institutional features of its criminality, including the routine use of force and self-financing of individual officers and stations, speak to how incidents of the sort described above are organized, not haphazard.
    These conditions present persons interested in improving the work of the police with profound and peculiar difficulties. For some three decades there has been talk of reform, and a few attempts, including one by the interim prime minister of the recent military government. But all have failed, in the same way that attempts to turn any other organized crime group into a legitimate enterprise against the will of its members could not possibly do otherwise.
    But had any attempts at reforming the Royal Thai Police succeeded, would it really have made any difference? Wouldn't a reformed organized crime group remain what it is at its roots? How different are reformed organized criminals from their unreformed counterparts?
    These questions could be cause for despair. After all, if things are that bad, then why bother? There are indeed many who think in this way, and do not believe that the police in Thailand can ever be significantly changed. Unsurprisingly, when this sort of thinking becomes widespread, it guarantees that things go on as usual. Without hope that anything can be done about the police, nothing can.
    On the other hand, pretending that things aren't as bad as they really are also ensures that things go on as usual. It allows people to fool themselves into thinking that a few quick fixes, like decentralizing and better training, may result in improvements. Superficially, they might. But anybody who looks honestly and seriously at the work of the police in Thailand for long enough will be obliged to acknowledge that it will take much more than this.
    That's why the U.N. definition is helpful. Let's be honest and describe Thailand's police as they are: organized criminals in uniform. If this much can be admitted, then it might be possible to get down to the business of what to do about them. --

  5. #5
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    If you are sure the events as you recounted them are correct, and you trust the lawyer you are dealing with I would say go ahead.

    If there is no connection at all to your wife and family and the drugs, they will try to settle. No shit, I have seen it before. I wish you the very best of luck. But please remember the Chonburi cops were for years ruled by the head of the eastern seaboards mafia. Kamnan Poh.

    The most corrupt cops are in Chonburi, and sadly now
    most tourist areas. I think the UN is right in general about the police corruption here. But having a couple of young commissioned cops in the wifes family makes me think different. They are straight up. And at like 33 and 37 will not really rise up much higher than they are.

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat

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    Whats the chances a member of the wife's family sells drugs.

  7. #7
    Member Nietzsche's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles View Post
    Whats the chances a member of the wife's family sells drugs
    Could be the wife.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nietzsche View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles View Post
    Whats the chances a member of the wife's family sells drugs
    Could be the wife.
    Highly possible, I'am having troubles believing the police said the drugs were planted but the wife and child were still arrested ???

    Quote Originally Posted by bretby View Post
    They were asked to vacate the truck as police searched it and low and behold the crooks produced some type of drug that they said was (planted) in our truck. My son and my wife were both arrested and taken off to jail.

  9. #9
    Banned for deleting Gallery
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    Relative took the police entry exam last week, along with thousands of others. The going rate for a free pass into the force by 'passing' the exam is 300.000 k apparently.

  10. #10
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    Police organized corruption will continue. While they're rising up toward the general dissatisfaction of 'political' graft, they might throw the policing system into the mix as the cause of the day. Nothing is going to change until the people say no - collectively.

  11. #11
    Out there...
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    The Bangkok police run karaoke bars, gogo bars and massage parlours, that cater to the Thai only crowd. Many of them have very nice cars and houses, which they didn't get from the rather meager wages...many of them are known to have giks and mia noi's by the bucketload.

    I know one police guy who runs a betting scam, which involves a huge amount of other cops.

    They really are a law unto themselves.

    I'd suggest this guy has next to no chance. If the relatives of those who died in the Santika fire wont obtain justice, what hope for this guy? He needs to be careful.
    "Slavery is the daughter of darkness; an ignorant people is the blind instrument of its own destruction; ambition and intrigue take advantage of the credulity and inexperience of men who have no political, economic or civil knowledge. They mistake pure illusion for reality, license for freedom, treason for patriotism, vengeance for justice."-Simón Bolívar

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat
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    He says he's been in Thailand for 16 years, but it's not entirely clear if he's been married to his current wife for 16 years. If he's recently married to this woman, then perhaps there's another angle to this sad tale.

  13. #13
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    Reminds me of living south of the US border.

    Quote Originally Posted by StrontiumDog View Post
    The Bangkok police run karaoke bars, gogo bars and massage parlours, that cater to the Thai only crowd. Many of them have very nice cars and houses, which they didn't get from the rather meager wages...many of them are known to have giks and mia noi's by the bucketload.

    I know one police guy who runs a betting scam, which involves a huge amount of other cops.

    They really are a law unto themselves.

    I'd suggest this guy has next to no chance. If the relatives of those who died in the Santika fire wont obtain justice, what hope for this guy? He needs to be careful.
    Same thing goes on in Mexico, having lived there at times over the last half century and being better connected there than here, I see the same things going on.
    And is there any doubt as to the honesty and pride and upstanding character of Mexican cops??

    I didn't think so.

    If it wasn't for the pride and honor of most of the Generals in the Mexican Army those folks would be truly fucked.

  14. #14
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    The alarming thing about this type of story which is on the increase is that it involves a total inncoent being fitted up. Scary if true.

    It was always true that when you've done something wrong the police would try and extract cash as a preferable outcome to chasing justice. Many who often do wrong things both minor (traffic) and major (sex crime) like this system.

    Does no-one ele notice that there is an increasing trend of BIB scams against the innocent? This is the most frightening of all. Perhaps an uncomfortable truth if you have committed your all to staying. Believing it's a bar girl scam is preferable as it won't happento you.

    I'm happy that I'm about to leave again. Was only planning 8 months this time as a convenient place to stay a while - turned into 14 but I really really want out for the third time. Next time I want a bolt hole for 8 months am inclined to try the totally unknown like Vietnam or maybe S. America or Jo'burg? Street crime is less scary than BIB scams.

  15. #15
    I am in Jail

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    Quote Originally Posted by bretby
    married to a wonderful Thai woman
    Quote Originally Posted by bretby
    local Gestapo of Nakon Sawan
    Quote Originally Posted by bretby
    honest hard working people,
    Quote Originally Posted by bretby
    Band of Thieves.

  16. #16
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    If he's got so much money, why doesn't he just play it like a Thai and order hits on all the pigs involved? When in Rome...right?

  17. #17
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    That would be cool at 30K a head, but if the hitster was caught, he would drop a dime on the dude and then he would be fucked for sure.
    Better off to sell all the shit here and get the squaw and papoose away from this crooked shithole and live in some place a lot nicer than Thailand,, like Tijuana or Rosarita beach.

    He gots lots of money so thats no problemo.

  18. #18
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    I liked this one so much I sent it to the BBC. Tourism industry in tatters? What a fucking surprise!!!!!!!!

  19. #19
    Member Dancing Priest's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fondles
    I'am having troubles believing the police said the drugs were planted
    Really? Given the record of the Thai Police it's perfectly believable. They are better criminals and extortionists than they are Policemen, put it that way.

    These things seem to be on the increase. The general lawlessness has increased tenfold since Thaksin was ousted and looks set to continue. I am staying in central Sukhumvit in Bangkok at the moment and I have never seen so many beggars in all my life, can't walk 20m without a cup being shaken in my direction.

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