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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    The US wants to take on China over illegal fishing in the South China Sea

    Washington’s recent moves to double down on illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing through a stronger maritime presence in Asia are welcome, analysts say, though they warn that countries in the region will not want militarised law enforcement that could spark bigger clashes in disputed waters – and not just with Beijing.


    Their comments are a response to United States National Security Adviser Robert O’Brien’s announcement last month that the US Coast Guard would deploy its newest fast-response cutters in the Indo-Pacific to police illegal fishing by China.


    Earlier this week, David Feith, deputy assistant secretary for regional and security policy and multilateral affairs at the US Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs, told journalists Washington would expand the number of “shiprider” agreements the US Coast Guard has with Pacific countries to help them counter China’s “aggressive behaviour” on the high seas and in sovereign waters of other nations.

    Under a shiprider agreement, one country’s authorities are allowed to board law enforcement vessels or aircraft of another nation while they are on patrol, during which the former can authorise the latter to take law enforcement action on their behalf.


    MORE The US wants to take on China over illegal fishing in the South China Sea. Why is Asean wary? | South China Morning Post

  2. #2
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    We need subs with torpedoes, not coastguard cutters.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat VocalNeal's Avatar
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    US Coast Guard
    What part of the coast are they guarding?

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    Under a shiprider agreement, one country’s authorities are allowed to board law enforcement vessels or aircraft of another nation while they are on patrol, during which the former can authorise the latter to take law enforcement action on their behalf.
    Possibly the Jamaican Supreme Court ruling may have some relevance with regard to legal and illegal use of such ameristani/Pirates of the Caribbean "rules".

    https://www.supremecourt.gov.jm/sites/default/files/judgments/Chin%2C%20David%20v%20Attorney%20General%20of%20Ja maica.pdi

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    torpedoes
    I suspect any use of exploding torpedoes may kill more fish and damage more islands. Coral, natural material or otherwise.

    Quote Originally Posted by VocalNeal View Post
    What part of the coast are they guarding?
    Pirates have no defined hunting ground. They appear from the mist do their evil deeds and scuttle off.

    UNCLOS defined rules are not obeyed by the non ratified types, such as the banana republic of ameristan. Especially when they currently have two Presidents vying for legitimacy.

    A quaint phrase usually attributed to South American countries, but now it seems the use has moved to a North American regime.

    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat Latindancer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post

    Under a shiprider agreement, one country’s authorities are allowed to board law enforcement vessels or aircraft of another nation while they are on patrol, during which the former can authorise the latter to take law enforcement action on their behalf.

    Great idea ! And a good remedy for what's going on there.

  6. #6
    Lone Monarchist
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    Just imagine China taking on the US in fishing in the gulf of mexico. The Seppos are epic hypocrites with no shame

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    Great idea ! And a good remedy for what's going on there.
    Nah fuck it, torpedo the c u n t s.

  8. #8
    Chinese spy
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    They would enjoy the same luck as the Chinese would enjoy if they tried to patrol the Gulf of Mexico, with subs. Difference is, they would most definitely not be stoopid enough to even try.
    The yanks are only there to be a pain in the arse really, much as many of the Chinese fishing boats there do not actually fish at all. They are paid to just be there.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    many of the Chinese fishing boats there do not actually fish at all. They are paid to just be there.
    Well there's your imbecile award for the day.

  10. #10
    Chinese spy
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    Sigh. Poor 'arry, leading with his chin again. And you wonder why you are so constantly buttsore:-



    A Centre for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) report from 2019 similarly tracked trawlers’ going dark’ in the South China Sea.

    “As they race to pull the last fish from the South China Sea, fishers stand at least as much chance of triggering a violent clash as do the region’s armed forces,” the report reads.

    But it also identified a more ominous behaviour.

    Many of the fishing boats are not fishing. They’re asserting control.

    “A different kind of fishing fleet, one engaged in paramilitary work on behalf of the state rather than the commercial enterprise of fishing, has emerged as the largest force in the Spratlys,” the CSIS study finds.

    “The activities of the militia are well-documented — they engage in patrol, surveillance, resupply, and other missions to bolster China’s presence in contested waters in the South and East China Seas. Beijing makes no secret of their existence, and some of the best-trained and best-equipped members engage in overt paramilitary activities such as the harassment of foreign vessels.”

    These non-fishing trawlers usually congregate around contested reefs and over disputed fishing grounds. Their presence alone forces non-Chinese fishers to move on.

    South China Sea: China’s ‘dark fleet’ now targeting Sea of Japan (news.com.au)


    I get sick of repeating this, but who is the imbecile now?
    A word of advice-


    GIYF

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    So you're not talking about fishing boats, you're talking about Chinky-funded military vessels disguised as fishing vessels, staffed by chinky-trained operatives, being parked in areas that they are building on or claim.

    And you call them chinky "fishing boats".

    Perhaps "Phishing boats" would be a better name.



  12. #12
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    It's the chinkies that are ramping up the tension.

    A draft law allowing the Chinese Coast Guard to use force could lead to gunboat diplomacy and put lives and properties of other countries’ citizens at risk, experts are concerned.The draft law, released by China's National People's Congress on November 4, empowers the country's coast guard to use force against vessels that violate China's territorial waters, exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and continental shelf, as well as areas where China has sovereignty claims.
    This bill has raised serious concerns, not only among other countries in the region, but also those that use the South China Sea, which Vietnam calls the East Sea, and the East China Sea.
    If passed, it would threaten the lives and properties of other countries' fishermen and obstruct freedom of navigation through important international shipping routes, experts say.
    At a discussion on avoiding risks of maritime clashes, which was part of an international science conference on the South China Sea held in Hanoi November 16-17, Chinese scholars argued that the draft law was part of China's internal affairs. They said Beijing has always pursued a traditional friendship policy with its neighbors on matters relating to the South China Sea.
    However scholars from India, Japan and Southeast Asian nations expressed their misgivings. Even though a number of other coastal countries also allow their coast guard forces to use weapons under certain circumstances, the Chinese Coast Guard has a history of unruly, aggressive behavior toward fishermen and vessels of other countries in recent times, they said.
    In April, a Chinese coast guard vessel rammed into and sank a Vietnamese fishing boat. China's survey ship Haiyang Dizhi 8 has violated Vietnam's EEZ on several occasions while being escorted by coast guard vessels, as well as tailed a Malaysian oil exploration vessel.
    Since the beginning of the year, China has sent coast guard vessels to approach the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands in the East China Sea more than 20 times to challenge Japan's claim over them. At one point, Chinese coast guard vessels maintained a presence in the area for 111 days straight, marking the longest period of continuous approachment since Japan's nationalization of a number of the islands in September 2012.
    Carl Thayer, Emeritus Professor at Australia's University of New South Wales, said the draft law reminded him of the "law on the territorial sea and the contiguous zone" that China had passed in 1992, in which it arbitrarily set a 12-nautical-mile territorial sea for all four island groups in the South China Sea, including Vietnam's Hoang Sa (Paracel) and Truong Sa (Spratly) islands.
    Thayer said the new draft law was just "old wine in a new bottle" for China to continue claiming sovereignty over most of the South China Sea.
    According to Chinese media, the country's coast guard has been equipped with patrol boats with displacements of up to 12,000 tons, making them the largest coast guard vessels in the world, even larger than the U.S. Navy's Ticonderoga-class cruisers and Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.
    These coast guard vessels are also equipped with 76mm H/PJ-26 naval guns, as well as two auxiliary guns and two anti-aircraft guns, making their firepower comparable to many types of warships.
    Thayer stressed that Chinese coast guard vessels are often equipped with weapons, and recalled a standoff between Malaysia and China that lasted from December 2019 until January this year. During this incident, China dispatched coast guard vessels near the area where the Malaysia-contracted drill ship West Capella was operating, prompting Malaysia to dispatch Jebat guided missile frigates to protect the drill ship.
    "Malaysia has guided missile frigates, but the Chinese Coast Guard has 5,000-ton ships and even patrol boats equipped with 76 mm guns. Therefore, this is similar to gunboat diplomacy," he added.
    Gunboat diplomacy is a term referring to the use of conspicuous displays of naval power to threaten other countries in order to achieve foreign policy objectives and force the threatened countries to make concessions in territorial or trade issues.
    Vice Admiral Yoji Koda, former Commander-in-Chief of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, commented that the world needs to consider how Chinese coast guard vessels will use their weapons should the draft law be passed.
    "We are very concerned about China's past activities and their future criteria on when the coast guard is allowed to use weapons. For example, in a number of areas in the South China Sea, we consider them international waters but China claims them to be its waters," he said.
    Koda suggested that by not clarifying the waters in which the draft law would apply, China "would create a serious international problem. This ambiguity is really arousing profound concerns," he said.
    When a Chinese scholar asked whether the prevention of maritime incidents is just an issue between China and the other countries or a regional issue, Vice Admiral Pradeep Chauhan, Director General of India's National Maritime Foundation, asserted that it is a regional issue and other countries are not excluded.
    He explained that China is paid closer attention because other countries, despite having differences, tend to operate within a framework based on international rules and practices, while China's sovereignty claims have been rejected by many parties.
    "Therefore, in this issue, the party that receives the most attention is obviously China," he said.
    https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/ch...s-4194995.html

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Even though a number of other coastal countries also allow their coast guard forces to use weapons under certain circumstances,
    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    When a Chinese scholar asked whether the prevention of maritime incidents is just an issue between China and the other countries or a regional issue, Vice Admiral Pradeep Chauhan, Director General of India's National Maritime Foundation, asserted that it is a regional issue and other countries are not excluded.
    Possibly not torpedoes though. 'arry's weapon of choice for some reason.

  14. #14
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Possibly not torpedoes though. 'arry's weapon of choice for some reason.
    As opposed to torturing civilians, monks etc... China's choice of violence - inflict it on those who can't fight back

  15. #15
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Possibly not torpedoes though. 'arry's weapon of choice for some reason.
    The chinkies have sunk two fishing boats HooHoo.

    Do you think they should be able to go around doing that with no consequence?

    Oh, of course you do, you snivelling chinky sycophant.

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    inflict it on those who can't fight back
    Plenty of ways, if the affected countries wish to retaliate. Oh, their politicians and citizens can recognise that China's politicians actually delivers on it's promises, others ....

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    The chinkies have sunk two fishing boats HooHoo.
    Only two, I'm sure a politician thought, "It was worth it". It appears to eradicate all moral blame for some country's politicians and citizens.



    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Do you think they should be able to go around doing that with no consequence?
    To some it makes them feel "exceptional", you know napalming farmers, bombing cities to rubble, starving millions, dropping nuclear bombs, leaving unexploded bombs for men, women and children to stumble over when they retreat beaten by peasants with bicycles ...

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Waffle waffle.

  18. #18
    Chinese spy
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    Yeh, who cares about a couplehundredthou dead A-rabs. Sorry, who do you work for again?

  19. #19
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    The U.S. Coast Guard Should Guard the U.S. Coasts

    By Lieutenant Commander Brian Hayes, U.S. Navy Reserve | September 21, 2020

    "If one is to believe recent articles in Proceedings and similar publications, the U.S. Coast Guard is undertasked. According to various Coast Guard authors, the service should:


    Also noteworthy are new proposed Coast Guard capabilities.


    It is surprising that no one has thought to resurrect the idea of having Coasties train and qualify as Navy SEALS, although perhaps that program’s failure is recent enough to serve as a cautionary tale. At this point, I would hardly be surprised to open Proceedings to an article on why the Coast Guard needs nuclear weapons or the ability to parachute into Pakistan.

    I have never served in the Coast Guard, and my professional contact with the service has been limited, but I have always held it in high regard. I vividly remember the Coast Guard’s heroic efforts in New York harbor on and immediately after 11 September 2001. I am awed by the physical courage and seamanship required to pull off its legendary at-sea rescues. I believe that the Coast Guard’s effort to combat cocaine smuggling is the most valuable counterdrug program in any agency of the U.S. government, period. When I board a vessel in the United States and see a certificate of Coast Guard inspection, I am confident that the vessel is seaworthy—and also that if things go south, the Coast Guard will come to pull me out of the water. Moreover, I know that the Coast Guard operates with a uniformed component (active and reserve) of fewer than 50,000 and that is an outstanding return on investment.

    The puzzle is this: Why should a service which is already doing great and important work, and which has a limited budget and manpower, look for new missions—particularly on the other side of the world? The U.S. Coast Guard is, after all, not the African Coast Guard or Indo-Pacific Coast Guard. It is also not a navy, and it could not easily re-create its World War II–era warfighting capabilities. An organization with limited resources is wise to focus on its core responsibilities, and not to seek out new ones.

    Do you want to hunt submarines or sail into the teeth of China’s maritime defenses? The U.S. Navy can use you. Want to be a street cop? U.S. police departments are hiring! Want to serve in Africa or Asia? We need good foreign service officers. But if you chose to join the Coast Guard, I hope that you can be excited to perform the Coast Guard’s existing missions, without looking to take on new ones for which the service is neither designed nor resourced.

    https://blog.usni.org/posts/2020/09/...the-u-s-coasts


    Some sailors appear to suggest that the coast guard resources are more applicable to local needs rather that creating an over the horizon, blue water task force, which may of course require newly designed, larger vessels.

    Of course the shipbuilders, the shipbuilders local politicians and retired sailors see an opportunity to make a few USD.

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    Yeh, who cares about a couplehundredthou dead A-rabs. Sorry, who do you work for again?
    Sorry, does the US want to bomb Iran to teach the chinkies a lesson or something?

    Stop being retarded.

  21. #21
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Why are Chinese fishermen destroying coral reefs in the South China Sea?


    What I came across on a reef far out in the middle of the South China Sea has left me shocked and confused.


    I'd been told that Chinese fishermen were deliberately destroying reefs near a group of Philippine-controlled atolls in the Spratly Islands but I was not convinced.


    "It goes on day and night, month after month," a Filipino mayor told me on the island of Palawan.


    "I think it is deliberate. It is like they are punishing us by destroying our reefs."




    I didn't take it seriously. I thought it might be anti-Chinese bile from a politician keen to blame everything on his disliked neighbour - a neighbour that claims most of the South China Sea as its own.


    But then, as our little aircraft descended towards the tiny Philippine-controlled island of Pagasa, I looked out of my window and saw it. At least a dozen boats were anchored on a nearby reef. Long plumes of sand and gravel were trailing out behind them.


    "Look," I said to my cameraman, Jiro. "That's what the mayor was talking about, that's the reef mining!"


    Even so, I was unprepared for what we found when we got out on the water.


    A Filipino boatman guided his tiny fishing boat right into the midst of the Chinese poachers.


    They had chained their boats to the reef and were revving their engines hard. Clouds of black diesel smoke poured into the air.





    I swam on and on. In every direction the destruction stretched for hundreds of metres, piles and piles of shattered white coral branches. It seemed so illogical. Why would fishermen, even poachers, destroy a whole coral system like this?


    Then, down below me, I spotted two of the poachers, wearing masks and trailing long breathing hoses behind them. They were manhandling something heavy.


    As they struggled up the sandy underwater slope, through a stream of bubbles, I caught sight of what they were carrying - a massive giant clam, at least 1m (3ft) across.


    They dropped it on to a pile near their boat. Next to it lay three others they had pulled out earlier. Clams of this size are probably 100 years old, and - as I discovered later on an internet auction site - can sell for between $1,000 (£665) and $2,000 a pair.


    We motored out to a group of much larger fishing boats anchored just off the reef. These are "mother ships" to the small poacher boats on the reef. On board the big boats I could see hundreds of clam shells stacked high.








    Why are Chinese fishermen destroying coral reefs in the South China Sea? - BBC News


    I guess if we don't care about our environment . . . nor international law . . .

    Nah, fuck 'em and their apologist supporters

  22. #22
    Thailand Expat Latindancer's Avatar
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    And that was five years ago.

    Imagine the situation now........

  23. #23
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Fucking chinky parasites.

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