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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Mekong River & Yom River Water Levels Rising – Locals Warned to Take Precautions

    NAKHON PHANOM: The water level in the Mekong river is rising steadily and people living along its banks at this northeastern border province have been advised to take precautions against possible overflowing.


    On Monday morning, water in the Mekong river was about 9 metres high, 4m below the spill-over level of 13m. The level is rising at 20-30 centimetres per day.


    Provincial authorities have warned people living along the Mekhong river bank in Ban Phaeng, Tha Uthen, Muang and That Phanom districts, as well as along four main streams emptying into the Mekong, to move their belongings and animals to higher grounds if heavy rain persists.


    Farmers raising fish in baskets in the Mekong river and its tributaries have been told to watch for sudden deaths of the fish due to the change in water conditions and damage caused to the baskets by the strong current, to minimise losses.


    PHICHIT: Irrigation officials in Phichit have begun flood mitigation procedures as the runoff-surge in the rain-swollen Yom River moves downstream into the province


    Provincial irrigation office chief Amnart Inthawongkaew said on Monday that sluice gates were being opened to feed water into all canals as the level of the Yom continued to rise.


    The flood is moving downstream from Sukhothai and Phitsanulok into Phichit, boosted by regular downpours in the upper northern region since last week.


    On Sunday, the river overflowed its banks in Sukhothais Muang district around dawn and residents scrambled to move their belongings to safe places. It was scary because the current was very strong, Chalao Saengklom of Moo 1 said.


    The Disaster Prevention and Mitigation Department said on Monday that flooding was reported in 553 villages in 10 northern provinces. Phrae and Nan were the worst affected.


    In Nan, the floodwater level in Wieng Sa district was dropping on Monday after the Yom River burst its banks over the weekend.

    Mekong River & Yom River Water Levels Rising – Locals Warned to Take Precautions | Chiang Mai One

  2. #2
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Really got under way a couple of days ago - a good portion of Si Samrong and Sawankhalok are historically disaster prone [low elevations] as witnessed today. Really nasty flooding in the northern sector of the province.
    After all these years of designing and engineering relief klongs throughout the immediate Mueang region - still have problems.

    Phichit receives hardships two fold, as both the Yom and Nan run through the province.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    How long til the drought? Couple of months?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    NAKHON PHANOM: The water level in the Mekong river is rising steadily
    Lets hope some of it gets down Cambodia ways.

    Drought, Dams on Mekong River Drop Cambodias Tonle Sap Lake to Record Low Levels

    2020-07-27

    Drought, Dams on Mekong River Drop Cambodias Tonle Sap Lake to Record Low Levels

    Look out for floods caused by by the Chinese reports soon from RFA.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Lets hope some of it gets down Cambodia ways.

    Drought, Dams on Mekong River Drop Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake to Record Low Levels

    2020-07-27

    Drought, Dams on Mekong River Drop Cambodia’s Tonle Sap Lake to Record Low Levels

    Look out for floods caused by by the Chinese reports soon from RFA.

    You were nearly there, except you couldn't quite bring yourself to say "Chinese Dams".

    Never mind, good effort.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    except you couldn't quite bring yourself to say
    To quote from MK's post:

    "Traditionally, heavy rains during the June-October wet season push water from the Mekong River into the Tonle Sap Lake via the 70-mile-long Tonle Sap River which reverses its flow during the November to May dry season, draining the lake into the Mekong. The Tonle Sap would normally increase its level by four times during the monsoon season."

    One suspects the use of the word "Traditionally" indicates it happens at regular intervals, historically speaking.

  7. #7
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    To quote from MK's post:

    "Traditionally, heavy rains during the June-October wet season push water from the Mekong River into the Tonle Sap Lake via the 70-mile-long Tonle Sap River which reverses its flow during the November to May dry season, draining the lake into the Mekong. The Tonle Sap would normally increase its level by four times during the monsoon season."

    One suspects the use of the word "Traditionally" indicates it happens at regular intervals, historically speaking.

    Yes, it's supposed to happen every year, but.....


    Using satellite imagery and river height gauges, an April study from Eyes on Earth, a water resources monitor, gave credence to suspicions that Lancang water policies were partly responsible for the record droughts experienced throughout the Mekong region in 2019.“The satellite data does not lie, and there was plenty of water in the Tibetan Plateau, even as countries like Cambodia and Thailand were under extreme duress,” Alan Basist, who co-wrote the report for Eyes on Earth, told The New York Times. “There was just a huge volume of water that was being held back in China.”
    Mekong dams destroy Tonle Sap Lake |The Third Pole

  8. #8
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    Your referenced site:

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Eyes on Earth
    Appears to be an excellent site producing "hydraulic models" that correspond accurately with observed data. As many of the graphs it has produced show there are great differences between the dry and wet halves of the year. It also recognises that when any dam is "commissioned" the measured flow is affected.

    Natural cycles equally affect the measured flow and the "hydraulic models.

    "In 2019, a combination of climate change, El Nio and dams on the Mekong and its tributaries caused the Tonle Sap River to reverse in August rather than June and for only six weeks instead of the usual five to six months. The resulting shallow, warm, oxygen-starved waters devastated the fisheries"

    As illustrated in their reports:

    Mekong River Wetness Anomalies in the 2019 Monsoon Season


    Your referenced site:

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Eyes on Earth
    Appears to be an excellent site producing "hydraulic models" that correspond accurately with observed data. As many of the graphs it has produced show there are great differences between the dry and wet halves of the year. It also recognises that when any dam is "commissioned" the measured flow is affected.

    Natural cycles equally affect the measured flow and the "hydraulic models.

    "In 2019, a combination of climate change, El Nio and dams on the Mekong and its tributaries caused the Tonle Sap River to reverse in August rather than June and for only six weeks instead of the usual five to six months. The resulting shallow, warm, oxygen-starved waters devastated the fisheries"

    As illustrated in their report:

    Mekong River Wetness Anomalies in the 2019 Monsoon Season

    PDF.js viewer

    Your

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Mekong dams destroy Tonle Sap Lake |The Third Pole
    Takes a less balanced approach, apportioning one culprit only, "Mekong Dams" in their headline and your snippet. They do include the additional "natural causes" in their report.

    Which you, as per norm, omit by choice.
    Last edited by OhOh; 25-08-2020 at 10:23 PM.

  9. #9
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    where's those SUBMARINES

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter View Post
    where's those SUBMARINES
    Unfortunately The 조선민주주의인민공화국 (The Democratic People's Republic of Korea) submarines, are now fully exposed in lake ទន្លេសាប (Tonl Sap).


    Other countries submarines are protecting the SCS and First Island Chain against the foreign regime forces. Some disguised fishing boats occasionally push the regime submarines onto the shore.

    Mekong River & Yom River Water Levels Rising – Locals Warned to Take Precautions-db0d7e7d05ae6d4796012a3a71edfd20-jpg


    They have been doing it for decades:

    Mekong River & Yom River Water Levels Rising – Locals Warned to Take Precautions-japanese-mini-sub-guam-jpg


    The locals keep the crews "entertained":

    Mekong River & Yom River Water Levels Rising – Locals Warned to Take Precautions-sub-visitor-jpg
    Last edited by OhOh; 26-08-2020 at 12:54 PM.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Your referenced site:
    Appears to be an excellent site producing "hydraulic models" that correspond accurately with observed data. As many of the graphs it has produced show there are great differences between the dry and wet halves of the year. It also recognises that when any dam is "commissioned" the measured flow is affected.

    Natural cycles equally affect the measured flow and the "hydraulic models.

    "In 2019, a combination of climate change, El Nio and dams on the Mekong and its tributaries caused the Tonle Sap River to reverse in August rather than June and for only six weeks instead of the usual five to six months. The resulting shallow, warm, oxygen-starved waters devastated the fisheries"

    As illustrated in their reports:

    Mekong River Wetness Anomalies in the 2019 Monsoon Season


    Your referenced site:



    Appears to be an excellent site producing "hydraulic models" that correspond accurately with observed data. As many of the graphs it has produced show there are great differences between the dry and wet halves of the year. It also recognises that when any dam is "commissioned" the measured flow is affected.

    Natural cycles equally affect the measured flow and the "hydraulic models.

    "In 2019, a combination of climate change, El Nio and dams on the Mekong and its tributaries caused the Tonle Sap River to reverse in August rather than June and for only six weeks instead of the usual five to six months. The resulting shallow, warm, oxygen-starved waters devastated the fisheries"

    As illustrated in their report:

    Mekong River Wetness Anomalies in the 2019 Monsoon Season

    PDF.js viewer

    Your



    Takes a less balanced approach, apportioning one culprit only, "Mekong Dams" in their headline and your snippet. They do include the additional "natural causes" in their report.

    Which you, as per norm, omit by choice.

    You seem to be so excited that you are repeating yourself. FFS the waffling is bad enough the first time.

    Anyway, their words, not mine:
    “There was just a huge volume of water that was being held back in China.”

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Anyway, their words, not mine:
    “There was just a huge volume of water that was being held back in China.”
    Which as your expert source states happens whenever a dam is commissioned, as they fill the lake upstream of the dam.

    Once filled a regulated amount is subsequently released downstream. As being currently observed due to the natural monsoon rain.

    Other naturally occurring and allegedly "manageable" events should also be planned for.

    One could argue that the two international groups,:

    "China’s Lancang-Mekong Mechanism was China’s answer to development planning in lower Mekong countries, welcomed by the MRC when the organisation held its first leaders’ meeting in 2016. As recently as during the drought it December 2019, the MRC and LMC signed a memorandum of understanding on data and information exchange and basin-wide monitoring."

    Mekong dams destroy Tonle Sap Lake |The Third Pole

    allegedly already co-ordinating "river development", should join up to form a more seamless, "river development/flow operation management system".

    That then raises the question:

    Should the, single international river development/flow operation management group, answer to,

    The Asian countries through which the rivers flow.

    Whose requirements include decades long investment, social policies, environmental requirement .... ?

    or

    The Asian countries through which the rivers flow + foreign regimes.

    Whose demands in addition include foreign "here today gone tomorrow" media driven environmental and political driven agreement acceptance and revocation demands?
    Last edited by OhOh; 27-08-2020 at 10:04 AM.

  13. #13
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Which as your expert source states happens whenever a dam is commissioned, as they fill the lake upstream of the dam.

    Once filled a regulated amount is subsequently released downstream. As being currently observed due to the natural monsoon rain.

    Other naturally occurring and allegedly "manageable" events should also be planned for.

    One could argue that the two international groups,:

    "China’s Lancang-Mekong Mechanism was China’s answer to development planning in lower Mekong countries, welcomed by the MRC when the organisation held its first leaders’ meeting in 2016. As recently as during the drought it December 2019, the MRC and LMC signed a memorandum of understanding on data and information exchange and basin-wide monitoring."

    Mekong dams destroy Tonle Sap Lake |The Third Pole

    allegedly already co-ordinating "river development", should join up to form a more seamless, "river development/flow operation management system".

    That then raises the question:

    Should the, single international river development/flow operation management group, answer to,

    The Asian countries through which the rivers flow.

    Whose requirements include decades long investment, social policies, environmental requirement .... ?

    or

    The Asian countries through which the rivers flow + foreign regimes.

    Whose demands in addition include foreign "here today gone tomorrow" media driven environmental and political driven agreement acceptance and revocation demands?
    Your waffling is pathetic.

    They could have released water and they chose not to.

    The chinkies are using water as diplomatic muscle.

    No amount of your babbling horseshit can hide the fact.

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    ONWR Expects Overflow of Yom will End in a Week

    BANGKOK(NNT) - The crisis of the overflowing Yom river in the northern part of Thailand is expected to end by the end of this month as the mass of water is flowing from Sukhothai to Phitsanulok and other provinces.


    Somkiat Prajumwong, Secretary-General of the Office of National Water Resources or ONWR, revealed that the current flood situation has already passed its peak and started to become lower. It is believed there are still 80 million cubic meters of water covering the area of 73,400 rai in Sukhothai and Phitsanulok that will be completely drained by the end of this month.


    Most of the flood water is currently being drained and flowing into the major waterway system; the rest will be drained through Nakhon Sawan and will be stored in the Chaopraya Dam in Chai Nat.


    The Department of Royal Irrigation will divert water to western and eastern waterway systems to store it for agriculture in the lower Chao Phraya River area that is currently experiencing drought conditions.


    The department will also divert water into reservoirs in Chonburi to be available during next year’s drought.


    In the long term, local authorities have suggested ONWR dig more holding reservoirs in Sukhothai and Phitsanulok and dredge waterways to store more water.


    In 2022, the Department of Royal Irrigation will also finish a water diversion canal that will be able to drain 500 cubic meters of water per second between major rivers and waterways.


    Mr. Somkiat also added that the current amount of water is off the chart, however, it is still not enough to end the drought especially in the lower part of the Chao Phraya river system and in the Northeastern region.

    http://thainews.prd.go.th/en/news/de...00827095553814

  15. #15
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Mr. Somkiat also added that the current amount of water is off the chart, however, it is still not enough to end the drought especially in the lower part of the Chao Phraya river system and in the Northeastern region.
    And so it begins again...

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    The Department of Royal Irrigation will divert water to western and eastern waterway systems to store it for agriculture in the lower Chao Phraya River area that is currently experiencing drought conditions.
    One hopes some will get through to Cambodia.

  17. #17
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    One hopes some will get through to Cambodia.
    What, after it's left Bangkok and gone out to sea?



    BANGKOK(NNT) - The crisis of the overflowing Yom river

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    What, after it's left Bangkok and gone out to sea?
    You are correct there doesn't appear to be any connection to the Chinese river systems.

    Here is a gif which illustrates the filling and drying out of the lake:



    Mekong River & Yom River Water Levels Rising – Locals Warned to Take Precautions-800px-tonle_sap_lake_phases-gif
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mekong River & Yom River Water Levels Rising – Locals Warned to Take Precautions-tonle_sap_lake_phases-jpg  
    Last edited by OhOh; 30-08-2020 at 11:56 AM.

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat
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    It appears that the Don Sahong dam in Laos, was commissioning from October 2019, which may have had an input to this years lake fill.

    "The Don Sahong Power Company entered into a concession agreement with the government of Laos on 15 September 2015, on a build, operate and transfer basis, with a concession period of 25 years after the commercial operation date, expected to be in 2019. An EPC contract with Sinohydro was signed on 15 October 2015, marking the start of construction.[14]

    The first of four generators of the dam started its teste in October 2019.[15] The whole hydropower plant started operating in January 2020.
    [4]"

    Don Sahong Dam - Wikipedia

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    You are correct there doesn't appear to be any connection to the Chinese river systems.
    Way to go Hoo Hoo!

    Your normal response would be a three page waffle about how Yom sounds like Yam.

    I'm impressed.

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    It appears that the Don Sahong dam in Laos, was commissioning from October 2019, which may have had an input to this years lake fill.

    "The Don Sahong Power Company entered into a concession agreement with the government of Laos on 15 September 2015, on a build, operate and transfer basis, with a concession period of 25 years after the commercial operation date, expected to be in 2019. An EPC contract with Sinohydro was signed on 15 October 2015, marking the start of construction.[14]

    The first of four generators of the dam started its teste in October 2019.[15] The whole hydropower plant started operating in January 2020.
    [4]"

    Don Sahong Dam - Wikipedia
    Yes we know the problems caused by the chinkies are exacerbated by the Laos dams, and we know there are Thais that have invested in them to make money, er sorry to bring power to Thailand.

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