Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30
  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Last Online
    @
    Location
    Chiang Mai
    Posts
    32,658

    Ex-Malaysian PM Najib Convicted on All Charges in First 1MDB Corruption Case

    A Kuala Lumpur court on Tuesday found ex-Prime Minister Najib Razak guilty of all seven charges in the first of his corruption trials tied to the looting of billions of dollars from state fund 1MDB – an unprecedented conviction handed to a former head of government in Malaysia.


    Najib was convicted on one count of abuse of power, three counts of criminal breach of trust, and three counts of money-laundering over allegations that he illegally received 42 million ringgit (U.S. $9.67 million) from SRC International, a subsidiary of 1Malaysia Development Berhad. Najib had established 1MDB in 2009 to benefit the Malaysian people, when he served both as prime minister and finance minister.


    “After considering all [the] evidence in this trial, I find that the prosecution has successfully proven its case beyond a reasonable doubt … I therefore find the accused guilty and convict the accused on all seven charges,” Kuala Lumpur High Court Judge Nazlan Ghazali said at the end of the verdict, which took him about 90 minutes to read out.


    On a monitor in another room at the courthouse, journalists were watching the proceedings. Najib, could be seen leaning back in his chair with a resigned look on his face as the judge finished handing down the verdict.


    Afterwards a crowd of supporters of Najib and his United Malays National Organization (UMNO) party gathered outside the courthouse to voice their anger over the ruling.


    “Dissolve the parliament! Long live my boss! God is great!” they chanted in protest.


    Late in the afternoon, hours after the verdict came down, the 67-year-old former leader made a brief statement before the judge, after Najib’s defense team had pleaded for the sentencing phase to be postponed till another day.


    “I … ensured a fairer and more gentle society. I abolished the ISA [Internal Security Act], something I wasn’t given much credit for. I ensured that the country did not undergo periods of abuse of power,” Najib told the court, while also highlighting nearly a decade of robust economic growth that his government had brought to Malaysia during his nine years in power.


    He said he had also tried to implement a more transparent system of political donations, but such legislation needed bipartisan backing and his proposal died because the opposition did not agree to it.


    He added: “[L]et me say it again … I did not demand for the 42 million [ringgit], I did not plan for the 42 million, nor was the 42 million offered to me, and there has been no evidence to say so.”


    When Najib arrived at the courthouse for the verdict scheduled for 10 a.m. (local time), hundreds of his supporters clad in partisan red or blue shirts were waiting for him in the nearby streets.


    A crowd of Najib’s supporters and journalists mobbed the ex-PM as he emerged from his car and walked with senior UMNO party leaders to the courthouse gate, a distance of about 100 meters (328 feet).


    Some of his supporters prayed for Najib as he entered the building. He wore a face mask to guard against the coronavirus. He was dressed in a tan suit, white shirt and orange-and-blue tie.


    “We did not expect him to lose the case,” said Rosni Sohar, the secretary of Wanita UMNO Malaysia, UMNO’s women’s wing.


    “We accept the court decision with a heavy heart. This is not the end,” she told BenarNews outside the courthouse. “We also hope that his lawyers will find the facts and evidence to free him.”


    On the eve of the verdict, Najib posted a message on his Facebook page in which he said that he expected the SRC trial to continue at the appeals’ court level no matter how the trial judge ruled on Tuesday.


    “Whatever the verdict tomorrow is at the high court, this is not the end,” Najib said on Monday, as he thanked his supporters, who refer to him as “bossku,” Malay for “my boss.”


    “I have not given up. Yes, we shall go to the Court of Appeal next. I am ready.”


    It was not immediately clear whether the trial's sentencing phase would take place later on Tuesday, with Najib facing the prospect of spending decades in prison based on the conviction.


    Nik Nazmi Nik Ahmad, an MP and chief organizing secretary for the opposition People’s Justice Party, said justice had been done through Tuesday’s conviction of Najib.


    “This proves that the years-long struggle to expose and bring to justice the abuses of the 1Malaysia Development Berhad (1MDB) scandal by so many patriotic Malaysians has finally been vindicated,” the lawmaker said in a statement. “Every cent that was stolen must be returned and all guilty parties brought to justice.”


    According to an expert in Malaysian politics, Tuesday’s verdict has both good and bad implications for the government of Prime Minister Muhyiddin Yassin.


    Muhyiddin’s “position as the prime Minister will be strengthened because of his image of wanting to create a high-integrity government,” Mazlan Ali, a senior lecturer at Universiti Tecknologi Malaysia, told BenarNews.


    “Even though the [court’s] decision has nothing to do with the prime minister, in general the perception is that Muhyiddin did not interfere in the court process,” he said.


    The ruling Perikatan Nasional coalition, at the same time, had suffered a blow with the verdict against Najib because the former prime minister was now about to lose his parliamentary seat, weakening the bloc’s already slender majority, Mazlan added.


    A scandal with global reach


    Najib is still standing trial in another court on 25 charges of abuse of power and money laundering connected with 2.3 billion ringgit ($551 million) that went missing from 1MDB. He could also face additional trials on 10 other corruption-related charges tied to the state investment fund.


    Malaysian and U.S. prosecutors had alleged that $4.5 billion (18.3 billion ringgit) was diverted from 1MDB and SRC to bank accounts held by Najib and others.


    The allegations of massive corruption connected to 1MDB led to Najib’s downfall as prime minister when his UMNO party, which had dominated Malaysian politics for 61 years, was swept out of office in the May 2018 general election.


    The Pakatan Harapan (Alliance of Hope) government, which came to power then, moved quickly to charge Najib and others within his inner circle as part of criminal investigations into the 1MDB scandal.


    But the Pakatan government, which was elected on a campaign pledge to rid government of corruption, collapsed at the end of February 2020. A new unelected government anchored by UMNO has since taken over and is led by Muhyiddin, who quit that party after being sacked as Najib’s deputy prime minister in 2015, when Muhyiddin publically raised concerns about the 1MDB affair.


    Muhyiddin replaced Mahathir Mohamad as prime minister in early March after forming a new coalition and convincing the king that he had the support of a majority of MPs.


    1MDB was the target of money-laundering investigations in at least a half-dozen countries outside Malaysia, including the United States, Singapore and Switzerland.


    In December 2017, then-U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions described the plundering of massive amounts of cash from Malaysia’s 1MDB fund as “kleptocracy at its worst,” when he revealed that the United States had seized or restrained $3.5 billion as part of a corruption probe.


    “Allegedly corrupt officials and their associates reportedly used the funds for a lavish spending spree,” Sessions said in a speech at the time, prompting officials in Najib’s government to deny that the prime minister, who was referred to repeatedly in U.S. federal court documents as “Malaysian Official 1,” had a role in the looting of 1MDB money.


    Cash from the state investment fund was spent on high-end real estate in New York and California as well as the purchase of a superyacht, U.S. Department of Justice officials alleged in court papers.


    A central figure in the scandal was Jho Low – a Malaysian financier and fugitive from justice whose real name is Low Taek Jho.


    During the SRC trial, the defense team hammered the point that Najib was a victim of manipulation by Jho Low as well as SRC International’s former managing director, Nik Faisal Ariff Kamil.


    The trial was held over 94 days with 57 witnesses called for the prosecution and 19 taking the stand for the defense.


    In their closing argument, prosecutors blamed Najib, in his parallel role as finance minister, of orchestrating the crime, adding that Jho Low had acted on his orders.


    Jho Low, who faces his own criminal charges in Malaysia related to 1MDB, reached a deal in the U.S. to turn over assets valued at $700 million (2.925 billion ringgit) purchased with 1MDB funds.


    In mid-May, Malaysian prosecutors dropped money-laundering charges against Riza Aziz, a Hollywood film producer who is Najib’s stepson, after anti-graft authorities said they had reached a deal to recover more than $100 million (425.8 million ringgit) that was missing from 1MDB. Aziz’s deal is an order of discharge not amounting to an acquittal.


    In addition to the former prime minister, Najib’s wife, Rosmah Mansor, and Ahmad Zahid Hamidi – who served as deputy prime minister under Najib after Muhyiddin’s sacking and is now the president of UMNO – have also been charged separately in connection with the 1MDB scandal.


    During Tuesday’s court session, Zahid sat next to Najib as the judge delivered his verdict.


    “Najib’s conviction on the seven charges reinforces the belief of many Malaysians that there was abuse of power and corruption at the highest echelons of power,” Lim Wei Jiet, a legal expert and secretary general of the National Human Rights Society (HAKAM), told BenarNews.


    “It is also a historic day for Malaysia whereby a former Prime Minister was convicted for the first time in our history,” he said.

    Ex-Malaysian PM Najib Convicted on All Charges in First 1MDB Corruption Case

  2. #2
    Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    17-09-2020 @ 04:49 PM
    Location
    Trawlland, not Nong Khai
    Posts
    433
    It's 12 years ++ jail, RM210m fine for Najib


    6.30pm - Justice Mohd Nazlan Mohd Ghazali sentences Najib Abdul Razak to 12 years jail and fines him RM210 million for abuse of power.


    As for the three money laundering and three criminal breaches of trust charges, each charge carries a 10-year jail sentence.


    All the jail sentences are to run concurrently. There is no fine for the money laundering charges.

    6.45pm - Defence counsel Harvinderjit Singh submits that Najib is unable to pay the fine as he had already been ordered by the court to pay RM1.69 billion to the Inland Revenue Board.


    "Essentially, your lordship's ruling on five years jail term on default of the fine will come in effect straight away if the fine is not paid," he says.


    He points out that Section 311 of the Criminal Procedure Code allows for a stay of execution pending appeal, which will definitely follow.



    MY VIEW
    His defence was a pile of steaming dung. A secret bank account with strong cash flows of stolen money, exposed by Sarawak Report he said there was no money missing and ignored it. Now he is playing that he is the victim.

    Bossku now has RM1.9bn (near US$500m) to pay and his trials are not yet over. This is a mere bagattele for Bossku who has been robbing 15% from most state projects for a long time, but how would Bossku hide where it came from?

    The 12+5 in jail seem realistic but the bad news is not yet over. The jail sentence was far below the maximum.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,624
    Quote Originally Posted by BKKBanger View Post
    The jail sentence was far below the maximum.
    ...prediction: Najib ( and enabling cronies) won't see a day in jail while his wealthy supporters will be enlisted to pay any fines...wife will continue bling accrual through online shopping...

  4. #4
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    11,272
    Poor thing, it's so sad when national leaders become careless and end up prosecuted. Fortunately Thailand won't ever need to go through the international embarrassment of prosecuting our glorious leaders, they're far more sensible, pwn the courts anyway, and the guns probably help a bit too.

  5. #5
    Thailand Expat
    docmartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:21 PM
    Location
    SW Australia
    Posts
    1,438
    Prediction - clueless poverty-stricken muppets will continue to support their great leader despite the evidence that he’s blatantly ripped them off bigtime.
    Because that’s how they roll ...

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    11,272
    True, squarehead still has a following despite looting their treasury.

  7. #7
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    23,671
    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    Prediction - clueless poverty-stricken muppets
    You're referring to Malaysia?


    Yea, what will possibly happen is the appeals process, the findings of which are final. He will hope that BM will regain government and his trial will subsequently slowly die away

    But, kudos to the judicial system in Malaysia - most SEAsian nations could learn a thing or two

  8. #8
    Thailand Expat
    docmartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:21 PM
    Location
    SW Australia
    Posts
    1,438
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    You're referring to Malaysia?
    Yep.
    Same the world over.
    Those at the bottom of the pile often blindly worship thieving self-interested arseholes because of sectism, tribalism or just plain stupidity.
    The obvious examples are the Trump supporters with no health cover and so on.
    Despite numerous attempts by decent types to defend the weak by policy or religion or whatever the peasantry loves a strongman and don't seem to notice that they're being sodomized.

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,624
    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    the peasantry loves a strongman and don't seem to notice that they're being sodomized.
    ...they're not the only ones...

  10. #10
    Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    17-09-2020 @ 04:49 PM
    Location
    Trawlland, not Nong Khai
    Posts
    433
    With the political skullduggery of the Malay nationalists over the last 6 months, a backdoor government is scraping by that is dominated by UMNO, Bossku's own party. They did not stop the process, why?

    Unfortunately for Bossku loyalty is only ever skin deep in a Malay politician, the roaches are scuttling away today and they will generally be glad that it is only his family that will go down, the rest will carry on. Without money Bossku will not be able to hang on to them and when he goes to prison, which looks likely, he will be stopped from pontificating on line and in the Dewan Rakyat.

    His lawyer 'Just Call Shafee" and Lwyrup, is himself facing a massive fine and compounds on undisclosed income from Bossku of US$2.5m. He is deep in with money laundering and tax evasion.

    so the new tactic is to paint Bossku as a victim and a new narrative has appeared that 99% of the money (not stolen of course) was spent on single mothers and orphans. This seems to stem from specific instances of lavish spending mentioned in court only accounting for 1%, there was no accounting for the other monies and where they actually went so Shafee can now claim, after the court case is closed, that it was actually spent on charitable purposes.

    TV news captured a fat old Malay woman getting very upset after the verdict, ranting and raving about how much Bossku had helped single mothers with the SRC money etc. Deranged woman seemed to have no concept of how a man earning $1000 a month with no inheritance could have such a lavish lifestyle and help single mothers without stealing money. It was the Robin Hood defence.

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat
    docmartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:21 PM
    Location
    SW Australia
    Posts
    1,438
    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...they're not the only ones...
    Whatever happens at your gym is your business ;-)

    Meanwhile back in Malaysia the likelihood of the big man lining up for jail chow is about four-fifths of fuck all.
    The appeal process will be dragged on for as long as possible.
    Money will speak loudly.

  12. #12
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Last Online
    @
    Posts
    12,624
    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    Money will speak loudly.
    ...so will time: he will die a free man...

  13. #13
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    23,671
    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    Prediction - clueless poverty-stricken muppets
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    You're referring to Malaysia?
    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    Yep
    I've been in Malaysia close to 15 years and have yet to come across "poverty-stricken" peoples . . . some orang asli communities might ft the bill but they are quite apolitical.

    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    Same the world over.
    Denmark, Switzerland, NZ etc . . . ???

    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    Those at the bottom of the pile often blindly worship thieving self-interested arseholes because of sectism, tribalism or just plain stupidity.
    The obvious examples are the Trump supporters with no health cover and so on.
    Sectarianism . . . but yes, agree with you on that last paragraph

  14. #14
    Thailand Expat
    docmartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:21 PM
    Location
    SW Australia
    Posts
    1,438
    Well I dare say that not many Malaysians are living from meal to meal but there’d be many folk struggling unnecessarily given that wealth could be distributed more equitably.

    There’d be many people in NZ or Denmark or elsewhere who give political support based on loyalty rather than rational analysis. That’s how people are.

    And yes, it’s ‘sectarianism’ not ‘sectism’.
    I’m a self-educated man and my teacher lets me down sometimes.

  15. #15
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    23,671
    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    And yes, it’s ‘sectarianism’ not ‘sectism’.
    I’m a self-educated man and my teacher lets me down sometimes.
    I wasn't criticising, seriously.

    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    there’d be many folk struggling unnecessarily given that wealth could be distributed more equitably.
    Very true

    Quote Originally Posted by docmartin View Post
    There’d be many people in NZ or Denmark or elsewhere who give political support based on loyalty rather than rational analysis. That’s how people are.
    And also very true. Can't disagree

  16. #16
    Thailand Expat
    docmartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:21 PM
    Location
    SW Australia
    Posts
    1,438
    I didn’t think you were.
    I’m a fan of correct diction too

  17. #17
    Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    17-09-2020 @ 04:49 PM
    Location
    Trawlland, not Nong Khai
    Posts
    433
    True you do not see many poverty stricken Malays, the malls are full of ones who have money.

    However there is poverty in Malaysia, same as anywhere. All races, all genders, all religions, all creeds and not just Malaysian.

    Orang Asli get it worst of racial groupings. Wonder why they do not just ask for their country back from the Malays.

  18. #18
    Thailand Expat
    docmartin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 09:21 PM
    Location
    SW Australia
    Posts
    1,438
    Because they’d be wasting their breaths.
    Malays aren’t woke snowflakes

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat
    TheRealKW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:04 AM
    Posts
    3,691
    Quote Originally Posted by BKKBanger View Post
    Orang Asli get it worst of racial groupings.
    Well, apart from the Rohingya refugees...

    Quote Originally Posted by BKKBanger View Post
    Wonder why they do not just ask for their country back from the Malays.
    Aint orang asli Malay?

    And everyone else Malaysian?

  20. #20
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    23,671
    Quote Originally Posted by TheRealKW View Post
    Well, apart from the Rohingya refugees...
    And they're not locals


    Quote Originally Posted by TheRealKW View Post
    Aint orang asli Malay?
    Not necessarily, depends on the tribe




    Quote Originally Posted by BKKBanger View Post
    Wonder why they do not just ask for their country back from the Malays.
    Tiny in number . . . but their voices are getting louder due to social media and NGOs

  21. #21
    Thailand Expat
    TheRealKW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Last Online
    Today @ 01:04 AM
    Posts
    3,691
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Not necessarily, depends on the tribe
    Gotcha.

    Still learning, thanks.

  22. #22
    Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    17-09-2020 @ 04:49 PM
    Location
    Trawlland, not Nong Khai
    Posts
    433
    The Malays are 56% and Bumiputeras are 14% of the total population, Chinese 23% and Indians 7%. Chinese used to be 40% but Malays have nearly twice as many kids, 4.5 per female. Penang and KL have a high percentage of Chinese, over 40%.

    Bumiputeras include Orang Asli who are a mixed bunch but in general have been there for a very long time. They have been pushed aside and marginalised by the growing crowd of Malays.

    Malays, under the constitution which is based on European racial categorisations, are defined as Muslims who practice Malay customs (adat) and culture. Their familes came from various places, a lot from what is now indonesia, specifically sumatra, between the 16th and 20th centuries. Minangkabau, Bugis or Javanese origins are common but the Malay race is spread across a lot of West Indonesia and the Philippines.

    Chinese came from various places but there was a surge in the 19th century.

    And then there are "foreigners" and "foreign workers" who have fewer rights and make up 10% of the population. Yes, another 10%!!!! They also make up a large part of the working population.

    Malaysian politics are dominated by race and creed, Najib was a 'defender of the Malays" as is everyone else in his UMNO party. He tells them they have special priviliges over the Chinese and anyone else. Between elections he is nice to non-Malays but the racial card comes out at elections. The Malay people are also subjecte dto religious police and religious courts and generally bullied into conforming and voting as told.

  23. #23
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    23,671
    Quote Originally Posted by BKKBanger View Post
    Bumiputeras include Orang Asli who are a mixed bunch but in general have been there for a very long time. They have been pushed aside and marginalised by the growing crowd of Malays.
    Not just by the Malays, include Chinese to that, but yes.
    Bumis are also ethnic Thais, among other groups - and then you have the indigenous Sabahans and Sarwakians - also Bumis.

    Malays have fewer rights than Sabahans and Sarawakians of any ethnicity (including the right to live there) . . . which is a source of joy from our Bornean friends.

  24. #24
    Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Last Online
    17-09-2020 @ 04:49 PM
    Location
    Trawlland, not Nong Khai
    Posts
    433
    Yep, keep those West Malaysia types out of Sabah and Sarawak. Felt like a breath of fresh air last year in Kuching after too long in the peninsular.

  25. #25
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Last Online
    Yesterday @ 06:58 PM
    Location
    Way, Way South of the border now - thank God!
    Posts
    23,671
    I'm lucky enough to work quite a bit in Sabah and Sarawak and with Kadazan, Dusun, Iban, Bedayuh who work for Petronas or Sabah/Sarawak Electric SESCO etc... a nice combination of professionalism and simply nice people.
    Even now I do weekly consult and training online and enjoy it most when the majority are Borneans - even the Malays and Chinese are nicer

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •