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  1. #26
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    JeZUZ...I didn't know anyone else defended the Chinese in that matter.....I must be a bit naive...

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    .I must be a bit naive.
    No need to state that fact.

  3. #28
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Hong Kong Protest Slogans Break China's New Security Law: Government

    Authorities in Hong Kong on Thursday warned that slogans and speech related to last year's protest movement or calls for independence for the city fall within the scope of draconian security legislation imposed on the city by the ruling Chinese Communist Party on June 30.


    "Some people participating in illegal and violent activities ... [on] July 1 displayed or possessed items bearing the words 「光復香港 時代革命」 ," the government said in a statement referring to a popular protest slogan which translates as "Free Hong Kong! Revolution Now!"


    "[This] slogan nowadays connotes "Hong Kong independence", or separating the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) from the People's Republic of China, altering the legal status of the HKSAR, or subverting the State power," it said.


    The government said it "strongly condemns any acts which challenge the sovereignty, unification and territorial integrity of the People's Republic of China."


    It cited the national security law, which bans actions or activities promoting "secession, subversion of state power and other [dangers to] national security."


    "The HKSAR Government calls upon members of the public not to defy the law," it said.


    The announcement came after police said they had made 10 arrests under the new law -- among hundreds for public order offenses -- as thousands came out onto the city's streets on Wednesday in defiance of a protest ban.


    A pro-democracy noodle restaurant said it was warned on Thursday by the police to remove its "Lennon Wall" of protest material on display because it was in breach of the new law.


    Media control looms


    Eastern District councillor Chui Chi-kin likened the warning, which came after someone alerted police to the protest material, to the political denunciations of China's Cultural Revolution (1966-1976).


    Meanwhile, the chairman of the Hong Kong Journalists Association (HKJA), Chris Yeung, said the law would also likely be used to exert controls over the city's once-freewheeling media.


    "There are articles in the law that says the government will regulate, supervise media and foreign media that seems to be a curtain-raiser to more control," Yeung said in comments reported by government broadcaster RTHK.


    "There are a lot of questions, worries that may not be answered, I think, in the near future until we know that some journalists or media organizations are in trouble under the law being taken to the court, or ordered to produce the information or news material they collected," he said.


    Yeung also hit out at attacks on at least one journalist by a police water cannon truck during protests on Wednesday.


    "Since June last year, police have been handling journalists with more use of violence and force and verbal abuse," he said.


    "Localist" political groups regarded by Beijing as pro-independence disbanded as soon as the law came into effect, with former Demosisto lawmaker Nathan Law leaving the city soon afterwards, according to media reports.


    Law's colleagues Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow were unable to follow suit, as they are under a travel ban and currently face court proceedings for their role in the protest movement.


    Anita Yip, vice-president of the Hong Kong Bar Association, said there are concerns that the courts will be less willing to grant bail at all under the new regime.


    "Article 42 [of the new law] is very clear that bail shall not be granted unless the judge has good reason to believe that the suspect won't continue to break this law," Yip told local media.


    'This is a socialist law'


    Hong Kong current affairs commentator Liu Ruishao said there seems to be scant presumption of innocence under the national security system, which is now being applied to Hong Kong under Beijing's direct supervision, and with the help of China's feared state security police.


    "When it comes to politically sensitive cases, I haven't really seen a single case in mainland China in which innocence is presumed," Liu said. "You are basically presumed guilty if you get as far as a court."


    Former Suzhou high-school teacher Pan Lu said such laws are a long-established part of the national security, or "stability maintenance" regime in mainland China.


    "This is a socialist law, so the wording is vague, and it doesn't have the same strict requirements as Western laws," Pan said. "As for the more than 50 countries that have expressed support for China over the [Hong Kong] national security law, I'm pretty sure that they are basically authoritarian regimes."


    Beijing academic Wu Qiang said the law will be the death of Hong Kong's status as an international port city.


    "What with the protests and the sanctions imposed by the international community, the death of Hong Kong is already here," Wu said. "This can only create a large number of refugees will be born, and the international community will try [to help them]."


    "The only thing the international community can do is to accept and resettle and [political] refugees from Hong Kong," he said.

    https://www.rfa.org/english/news/chi...020140755.html

  4. #29
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    As China tightens its grip on Hong Kong, people are leaving for Taiwan


    Residents of Hong Kong, deeply concerned by Beijing's new security law, seek safety and freedom in nearby Taiwan.

    As China tightens its grip on Hong Kong, people are leaving for Taiwan

  5. #30
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Legal or illegal, China knows damn well they can do just about anything they want in Hong Kong with little more than "criticism" from the international community.

    Brits had to have known this was inevitable when they gave it up in 97.

  6. #31
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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  7. #32
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Legal or illegal, China knows damn well they can do just about anything they want in Hong Kong with little more than "criticism" from the international community.

    Brits had to have known this was inevitable when they gave it up in 97.
    They didn't "give it up", it wasn't theirs to "give up".

    They handed it back at the end of a lease.

    And frankly I think the Hong Kongers did well getting 20+ years out of it before the chinkies rolled back in with a vengeance.

  8. #33
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    Imagine being a HKer who has spent their whole life there but is now well and truly trapped in the grip of repressive Chinese rule.

    Poor bastards.

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    And frankly I think the Hong Kongers did well getting 20+ years out of it before the chinkies rolled back in with a vengeance.
    Probably true. It shows well what Taiwan would have to expect if they would move one inch in the direction of any kind of union with China. Which they now would consider even less than before.

  10. #35
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    This is such bad news.. I feel very bad for the HK people, especially the students who have been fighting and protesting over so many years. Also, I feel bad for the many expats that I know that have moved from mainland China to HK to get away from 'Communism" and now not sure what they will do.

    I think this was coming for awhile, sadly. A friend of mine has dual citizenship Canadian/HK, not sure what is going to happen with that. I think Taiwan is going to be overrun soon from people trying to get away from HK.

    There was so much red tape trying to teach in China which got worse every year. Now many teachers aren't going to want to work in HK which has a great education system, but they won't want to go through all the hassle again. Plus, what is going to happen to the education system? Things may change. Glad I am away from mainland China and left when I did.

  11. #36
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    China prepared for international backlash over Hong Kong national security law

    Chinese government advisers said China expected tensions with the US to escalate with the passage by the National People’s Congress of a resolution calling for a national security law in the city. But Beijing’s retaliation would depend on US action, they said.

    “These threats [by the US] are what we expected. But they are futile in preventing the passing of the law. We have prepared for the worst case scenario,” said Ruan Zongze, senior research fellow at China Institute of International Studies, a think tank under China’s foreign ministry.

    The spat between China and the US over Hong Kong moved to the UN on Thursday, with Washington requesting an emergency meeting over the city, which Beijing refused to allow to proceed. The Chinese mission to the UN said the request was “baseless” and the legislation was purely China’s internal affair.

    The resolution to craft a tailor-made national security law for Hong Kong is expected to be put to a vote at the end of the National People’s Congress on Thursday afternoon. The proposal has drawn international alarm, with US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo declaring a day earlier that he had informed Congress the city no longer maintained a high degree of autonomy, “given facts on the ground”.

    “This decision gives me no pleasure. But sound policymaking requires a recognition of reality,” he said. “While the United States once hoped that free and prosperous Hong Kong would provide a model for authoritarian China, it is now clear that China is modelling Hong Kong after itself.”

    The US decision has raised questions about whether the special economic status currently enjoyed by Hong Kong under US law would be revoked. The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019 requires the State Department to certify at least annually that Hong Kong retains enough autonomy to justify its favourable treatment on trade, separate to that received by mainland China.

    US assistant secretary of state David Stilwell said the White House would decide how to respond, with options including sanctioning of officials and revoking Hong Kong’s special trading status.

    Foreign ministers from Britain, Australia and Canada issued a joint statement to express their alarm about the move while the European Union called for the need to preserve the city’s high degree of autonomy.

    Ruan and his fellow academic Shi Yinhong, director of the Centre of American Studies at Renmin University of China, agreed that a revocation of Hong Kong’s special trading status was unlikely.

    “I think the US government is quite hesitant about how strongly they should react to [China’s bill]. It’s unlikely that they will revoke Hong Kong’s special economic status because that would also hurt America’s interest in Hong Kong,” Shi said.

    Ruan said the “strong opposition from the West does not represent international consensus”, nor would it prevent the law from passing. But Shi said he expected it would be a long process that could drag out to five or even 10 years.

    “After the decision by the NPC, there will be implementation in Hong Kong. The US will act accordingly and, each time, it will cause tensions in Sino-US relations,” Shi said, adding that the interests and economies of both countries — already weakened by the coronavirus pandemic — would be severely hurt in the process.

    China has so far received vocal support from a handful of its staunchest allies including Russia, Iran and Cambodia, who have said the legislation is China’s domestic affair.

    There has been no official reaction from Beijing to Pompeo’s remarks, but Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian said Beijing would hit back with countermeasures if the US was to punish Beijing for the move.

    Hu Xijin, chief editor of Global Times, a tabloid affiliated with party mouthpiece People’s Daily, said revoking the special trading status was the only card available to Trump, but this would hurt American interests, with 85,000 US citizens in Hong Kong.
    Hu said on Weibo, China’s Twitter-like social media platform, that Hong Kong maintained its position as a global financial centre because of its ties with the mainland, rather than the stance of the US.

    China prepared for international backlash over Hong Kong national security law | South China Morning Post
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

  12. #37
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    ...3 million educated HKers with pseudo-British passports could easily be settled around the Pacific Rim as segments of a ChinaTown archipelago...family and cultural dislocation of course, but the Chinese have experienced force majeur diaspora before and done very well...

  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...3 million educated HKers with pseudo-British passports could easily be settled around the Pacific Rim as segments of a ChinaTown archipelago...family and cultural dislocation of course, but the Chinese have experienced force majeur diaspora before and done very well...
    we could do with a few here in korat who can cook good HK. food.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by headhunter View Post
    good HK. food.
    Oxymoron right there.

    It's bland as fuck.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    3 million educated HKers with pseudo-British passports could easily be settled around the Pacific Rim as segments of a ChinaTown archipelago
    But a deafening silence was heard from the local colonies/fighters of world class "human rights" to allow these economic refugees into their country!

    China passes Hong Kong security law: reports-silence-jpg
    Last edited by OhOh; 04-07-2020 at 10:48 AM.

  16. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    But a deafening silence was heard from the local, ex colonies/fighters of "human rights"!
    You are shamelessly embarrassing in the lengths you will go to to excuse (Chinese) despots, aren't you?

  17. #42
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    What is he even talking about? Several countries have said they'd accept them . . . China must be so proud that millions of their own people want to escape

  18. #43
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    But a deafening silence was heard from the local colonies/fighters of world class "human rights" to allow these economic refugees into their country!
    Kinda makes you wonder why the chinkies are spitting their little chinky dummies at the UK for offering sanctuary to three million, doesn't it?


  19. #44
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    Spitting more dummies at OZ, too... We said we'd take a few.

  20. #45
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Hong Kong officials disappointed at Canada’s move to suspend extradition pact

    HONG KONG (Reuters) – Senior officials in Hong Kong said on Saturday they were “very disappointed” at Canada’s decision to suspend its extradition treaty with the Chinese-ruled city and again slammed Washington for “interfering” in its affairs.


    Beijing imposed a new national security law this week on the former British colony, despite protests from Hong Kong residents and Western nations, setting China’s freest city and a major financial hub on a more authoritarian track.


    “The Canadian government needs to explain to the rule of law, and explain to the world, why it allows fugitives not to bear their legal responsibilities,” Hong Kong’s security chief, John Lee, told a radio programme on Saturday.


    Lee was very disappointed and strongly opposed Canada’s move, he added, as it let politics override the rule of law.


    The comments followed Canada’s statement on Friday that it was suspending the treaty with Hong Kong in the wake of the new law and could boost immigration from the city.


    Canada would also bar the export of sensitive military items to Hong Kong, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters.


    On Saturday’s programme, Hong Kong Justice Secretary Teresa Cheng said she was disappointed and expressed extreme regret over Canada’s move, adding that she thought it could probably violate international law.


    On Friday, a Hong Kong government spokesman described as “totally unacceptable” a bill passed by the U.S. Senate to penalize banks doing business with Chinese officials who implement the new law.


    “We reiterate that any ‘sanctions’ imposed under the act will not create an obligation for financial institutions under Hong Kong law,” the spokesman said in a statement.


    He urged the United States to immediately stop interfering in Hong Kong’s internal matters, adding that Beijing, as well as the city’s government, could take counter-measures when needed.

    Hong Kong officials disappointed at Canada’s move to suspend extradition pact – Thai PBS World

  21. #46
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Nice one Trudeau!

    Although I would imagine the vengeful chinkies will boycott Canadian Club or something.

  22. #47
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Activist leaves Hong Kong after new law to advocate abroad

    HONG KONG (AP) — Prominent Hong Kong democracy activist Nathan Law has left the city for an undisclosed location after testifying in a U.S. congressional hearing about a tough new security law imposed by mainland China on the semi-autonomous territory.


    Law, who declined to disclose his whereabouts for safety, said in an interview with The Associated Press on Friday that he left because Hong Kong needs an advocate for democracy who can work internationally.


    Under the new security law, activists and politicians in Hong Kong who speak to foreign media or testify in foreign hearings can be arrested for secessionism or colluding with foreign forces, Law said.


    ADVERTISEMENT


    “For me leaving the place that I love, that I grew up in, that I spent most of my life in, it’s definitely a really difficult decision, but this is more than a personal choice,” he said. “I miss everything from it.”


    The security law, which took effect Tuesday night, targets secessionist, subversive or terrorist acts, as well as collusion with foreign forces intervening in the city’s affairs.


    Under Beijing’s direction, local authorities have moved swiftly to implement the law’s sweeping conditions, with police arresting about 370 people Wednesday, including 10 on suspicion of directly violating the law, as thousands took to the streets in protest.


    In some cases, suspects were carrying items advocating Hong Kong’s independence, police said.


    China’s Cabinet on Friday appointed a veteran Communist Party cadre who rose to prominence during a crackdown on villagers seeking land rights in 2011 as head of a new central government national security office in Hong Kong. Zheng Yanxiong and his department will report directly to Beijing without oversight from Hong Kong’s courts or any requirement that they answer to local authorities.


    Law, 26, rose to prominence in Hong Kong as one of the student leaders of the pro-democracy Umbrella Revolution in 2014. In 2016, he became the youngest lawmaker elected to the city’s legislature but was later disqualified after he raised his tone while swearing allegiance to China during the oath, making it sound like a question.


    He was a leader of pro-democracy group Demosisto with fellow activists Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow. All three resigned Tuesday ahead of the security law coming into effect. With the loss of its top members, Demosisto dissolved.


    The Hong Kong government announced Thursday night that the popular protest slogan “Liberate Hong Kong, Revolution of Our Time” connotes a call for Hong Kong’s independence or its separation from China, and those using it or displaying it on flags or signs could be in violation of the new law.


    Critics including Law say the legislation effectively ends the “one country, two systems” framework under which the city was promised a high degree of autonomy when it reverted from British to Chinese rule in 1997.


    “That is blatantly eradicating ‘one country, two systems,’ it’s blatantly putting the last nail in the coffin,” Law said.

    He urged the international community to prioritize human rights over trade interests, and to present a united front to “combat or contain the authoritarian expansion of China.”


    Under the security legislation, the maximum punishment for serious offenses is life imprisonment, and suspects in certain cases may be sent to the mainland for trial if Beijing deems it has jurisdiction.


    A 24-year-old man who was arrested for allegedly stabbing a police officer during the protests on Wednesday has been charged with wounding with intent, police said Friday. He was arrested on board a plane to London, apparently trying to flee the territory. Police wouldn’t say if the man would face additional charges under the security law.


    Separately, police charged a 23-year-old man with incitement to secession and terrorist activities on Friday, making him the first person to be prosecuted under the new law. Tong Ying-kit is accused of crashing a motorcycle into a group of police during Wednesday’s protests while possessing a flag with the newly banned slogan.

    Activist leaves Hong Kong after new law to advocate abroad

  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by hallelujah View Post
    You are shamelessly embarrassing
    I post articles, whether they are to your liking, am I boverred"?

    There is, allegedly, an ignore button on the TD site, that one can use.

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Several countries have said they'd accept them
    As of today the only country, I am aware of, that has made any statement is this one:

    Canada suspends its extradition treaty with Hong Kong, eyes immigration boost


    July 3, 2020 / 10:18 PM / Updated 15 hours ago

    "Canada is suspending its extradition treaty with Hong Kong in the wake of new Chinese national security legislation and could boost immigration from the former British colony, top officials said on Friday.:

    "
    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Canada would continue to stand up for Hong Kong, which is home to 300,000 Canadians.
    Canada will not permit the export of sensitive military items to Hong Kong, he told reporters.
    “We are also suspending the Canada-Hong Kong extradition treaty ... we are also looking at additional measures, including around immigration,” he said. He did not give details. "

    "The new law has prompted a jump in inquiries from families looking to relocate to Canada, immigration lawyers said.

    Possible measures Ottawa could take include favoring Hong Kong residents who have family in Canada and allowing more people to apply for a work program that is a step towards gaining citizenship, lawyers say. "

    Canada suspends its extradition treaty with Hong Kong, eyes immigration boost - Reuters

    But if you have more government announcements on officially allowing additional immigration from Chinese citizens, post them.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    chinkies are spitting their little chinky dummies at the UK for offering sanctuary to three million
    I presume you have a link to post here on TD where China has commented on any country offering "sanctuary".

    MK hasn't posted any unusually.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  24. #49
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    I presume you have a link to post here on TD where China has commented on any country offering "sanctuary".
    Oh HooHoo are you playing the "I never saw that post" card?

    The chinkies are raging at Boris for offering citizenship to Hong Kongers who do not wish to live under Xitler's regime.

    Get over it.

  25. #50
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    The handful of expats I know still living in HK have been there 30 years now. Their reaction is frankly, a big so what. They all started out in favour of the protesters. The protest movement there reminds me of the BLM movement, or the sad parody it became- they totally lost the plot, and thus lost the People.

    As far as a mass exodus from HK is concerned- are you serious? There will not be one. Every place has it's problems, but most HKers actually rather like it there. There might be a trickle of folk nearing retirement age, looking for somewhere cheaper.

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