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  1. #76
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    India awakens to hidden charms of RIC


    Posted on June 23, 2020 by M. K. BHADRAKUMAR




    Vladimir Putin (L), Narendra Modi (C) and Xi Jinping (R) met at an informal trilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20, Osaka, June 18, 2019


    "There is a curious hype among Indian analysts over the Russia-India-China videoconference of foreign ministers taking place today. Even the compulsive detractors of processes such as RCI, BRICS and SCO that exclude the US are taking interest.
    The RIC process as such is not the focal point here but the strange coincidence of the immediate backdrop of India-China border tensions. The RIC process ought have evolved over time as a dynamic vector of India’s foreign policy. But that never happened.

    Several reasons can be attributed to it, but principally, there are four factors:

    • India is not a great team player and feels self-confident while pursuing its interests via bilateral channels;
    • India is wary of giving any impression that it is ‘ganging up’ with two great ‘revisionist’ powers in the US’ crosshairs on global chessboard — Russia and China;
    • India feels constrained in the Russia-India-China triangle due to its troubled relationship with China; and, most important,
    • India is intensely conscious that Washington regards the RIC as a hostile entity, which could weaken or undermine the American strategies in Asia and globally; a fully-loaded RIC is not an option for India given its manifest alignment with the anti-China ‘Quad’ platform.

    Today’s videoconference is a virtual conference and there isn’t going to be any ‘pull-aside’ between External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar and his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi. The event will be even more formal than usual. That is to say, there is no reason to expect the event to open the door to a pathway leading to the rose garden in India-China relations.

    On the contrary, what is at stake is that a reset in India-China relationship will be a long, tortuous bilateral process. The conditions for a meaningful strategic communication do not even exist in India at the moment. The hawks are still up in the skies and refuse to descend to mother earth.
    Nonsensical talk dominates the Indian narrative and many — including a former defence minister — have articulated absurd notions that Indian military capability in the Himalayas is more than a match for the PLA.

    There is even triumphalism that Indian Army killed a commanding officer of the PLA in the Galwan Valley. Meanwhile, the ultra-nationalists are burning Xi Jinping’s pictures. Many among the ruling elite seek a ‘boycott’ of trade and commerce with China.
    And then, there are the wild fantasies that due to the coronavirus and economic dislocation, China has been significantly weakened and the Chinese Communist Party is barely shoring up its support base.

    Like the tramps in Samuel Beckett’s play Waiting for Godot, Indians are waiting for the US to ‘decouple’ from China; Japan to create a ‘second front’ against China over Senkaku Islands; and Australia to bleed China white with sniper rifles.

    Clearly, this surreal setting hangs like an Albatross around Jaishankar’s neck. Nonetheless, being the hardcore realist he is, Jaishankar can be trusted to inch forward his communication with Wang even within the severe constraints of a virtual meeting.

    The real significance of the RIC meeting is that it is taking place. Following the one-on-one with PM Modi on June 16, Jaishankar followed up with a request to speak to Wang (to which the latter promptly agreed). And, it was after the conversation with Wang on June 17, where the two top diplomats reached some common ground as to the way out of the foxhole in Galwan Valley, that Jaishankar signalled his convenience to attend the RIC meet on June 23.

    It was a positive signal. Suffice to say, with PM’s approval, Jaishankar opened a political track with Beijing. Any interaction henceforth between Jaishankar and the Chinese leadership, therefore, constitutes a meaningful step forward. Today’s RIC meeting will be a sufficient enough breakthrough if a bilateral meeting ensues sometime in a near future.

    Indian analysts have gone haywire to estimate that Russia is wading into the Sino-Indian relationship. This is a misconception. President Vladimir Putin is not a fire fighter, although he has a rare genius as a world statesman to talk sense and inject rationality into conflict situations.
    Second, the alchemy of Russia-China entente must be understood: both sides have ample space to independently pursue their core interests — and, Moscow would be aware that territorial sovereignty is a core issue for China. Third, Russia and China do not necessarily agree on all topics under the sun.

    Having said that, Moscow and Beijing place great store in the RIC format as an important dimension to their common strategy to democratise the international system and to consolidate the world opinion on the imperatives of strict adherence to international law and the UN Charter in inter-state conduct.

    Simply put, from the Russian and Chinese perspective, the RIC supplements BRICS and the SCO while there is also the plus factor that RIC is their sole exclusive forum with India, whom both powers see as an increasingly significant player in the multilateral arena and a rising star in Asia whose Eurasian integration is in their interests.

    Of course, Russia and China are practitioners of the zen of creating synergy out of multilateral formats for enriching and strengthening their bilateral relationship, to harmonise divergences, if any, and to keep deepening their strategic convergence on regional and global issues.
    India tends to take an ‘all-or-nothing’ attitude, which is unfortunate. Perhaps, one good thing to come out India’s participation in the RIC meeting today lies in the signalling of its growing awareness of the hidden charms of this unique format in a world in historic transition.

    The way forward lies, arguably, in the three RIC countries undertaking some common projects in which all three become stakeholders in their shared future.


    India awakens to hidden charms of RIC - Indian Punchline
    Last edited by OhOh; 23-06-2020 at 08:11 PM.
    A tray full of GOLD is not worth a moment in time.

  2. #77
    Thailand Expat TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    India awakens to hidden charms of RIC


    Posted on June 23, 2020 by M. K. BHADRAKUMAR




    Vladimir Putin (L), Narendra Modi (C) and Xi Jinping (R) met at an informal trilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G20, Osaka, June 18, 2019


    "There is a curious hype among Indian analysts over the Russia-India-China videoconference of foreign ministers taking place today. Even the compulsive detractors of processes such as RCI, BRICS and SCO that exclude the US are taking interest.
    The RIC process as such is not the focal point here but the strange coincidence of the immediate backdrop of India-China border tensions. The RIC process ought have evolved over time as a dynamic vector of India’s foreign policy. But that never happened.

    Several reasons can be attributed to it, but principally, there are four factors:

    • India is not a great team player and feels self-confident while pursuing its interests via bilateral channels;
    • India is wary of giving any impression that it is ‘ganging up’ with two great ‘revisionist’ powers in the US’ crosshairs on global chessboard — Russia and China;
    • India feels constrained in the Russia-India-China triangle due to its troubled relationship with China; and, most important,
    • India is intensely conscious that Washington regards the RIC as a hostile entity, which could weaken or undermine the American strategies in Asia and globally; a fully-loaded RIC is not an option for India given its manifest alignment with the anti-China ‘Quad’ platform.

    Today’s videoconference is a virtual conference and there isn’t going to be any ‘pull-aside’ between External Affairs Minister S. Jaishankar and his Chinese counterpart Wang Yi. The event will be even more formal than usual. That is to say, there is no reason to expect the event to open the door to a pathway leading to the rose garden in India-China relations.

    On the contrary, what is at stake is that a reset in India-China relationship will be a long, tortuous bilateral process. The conditions for a meaningful strategic communication do not even exist in India at the moment. The hawks are still up in the skies and refuse to descend to mother earth.
    Nonsensical talk dominates the Indian narrative and many — including a former defence minister — have articulated absurd notions that Indian military capability in the Himalayas is more than a match for the PLA.

    There is even triumphalism that Indian Army killed a commanding officer of the PLA in the Galwan Valley. Meanwhile, the ultra-nationalists are burning Xi Jinping’s pictures. Many among the ruling elite seek a ‘boycott’ of trade and commerce with China.
    And then, there are the wild fantasies that due to the coronavirus and economic dislocation, China has been significantly weakened and the Chinese Communist Party is barely shoring up its support base.

    Like the tramps in Samuel Beckett’s play Waiting for Godot, Indians are waiting for the US to ‘decouple’ from China; Japan to create a ‘second front’ against China over Senkaku Islands; and Australia to bleed China white with sniper rifles.

    Clearly, this surreal setting hangs like an Albatross around Jaishankar’s neck. Nonetheless, being the hardcore realist he is, Jaishankar can be trusted to inch forward his communication with Wang even within the severe constraints of a virtual meeting.

    The real significance of the RIC meeting is that it is taking place. Following the one-on-one with PM Modi on June 16, Jaishankar followed up with a request to speak to Wang (to which the latter promptly agreed). And, it was after the conversation with Wang on June 17, where the two top diplomats reached some common ground as to the way out of the foxhole in Galwan Valley, that Jaishankar signalled his convenience to attend the RIC meet on June 23.

    It was a positive signal. Suffice to say, with PM’s approval, Jaishankar opened a political track with Beijing. Any interaction henceforth between Jaishankar and the Chinese leadership, therefore, constitutes a meaningful step forward. Today’s RIC meeting will be a sufficient enough breakthrough if a bilateral meeting ensues sometime in a near future.

    Indian analysts have gone haywire to estimate that Russia is wading into the Sino-Indian relationship. This is a misconception. President Vladimir Putin is not a fire fighter, although he has a rare genius as a world statesman to talk sense and inject rationality into conflict situations.
    Second, the alchemy of Russia-China entente must be understood: both sides have ample space to independently pursue their core interests — and, Moscow would be aware that territorial sovereignty is a core issue for China. Third, Russia and China do not necessarily agree on all topics under the sun.

    Having said that, Moscow and Beijing place great store in the RIC format as an important dimension to their common strategy to democratise the international system and to consolidate the world opinion on the imperatives of strict adherence to international law and the UN Charter in inter-state conduct.

    Simply put, from the Russian and Chinese perspective, the RIC supplements BRICS and the SCO while there is also the plus factor that RIC is their sole exclusive forum with India, whom both powers see as an increasingly significant player in the multilateral arena and a rising star in Asia whose Eurasian integration is in their interests.

    Of course, Russia and China are practitioners of the zen of creating synergy out of multilateral formats for enriching and strengthening their bilateral relationship, to harmonise divergences, if any, and to keep deepening their strategic convergence on regional and global issues.
    India tends to take an ‘all-or-nothing’ attitude, which is unfortunate. Perhaps, one good thing to come out India’s participation in the RIC meeting today lies in the signalling of its growing awareness of the hidden charms of this unique format in a world in historic transition.

    The way forward lies, arguably, in the three RIC countries undertaking some common projects in which all three become stakeholders in their shared future.


    India awakens to hidden charms of RIC - Indian Punchline
    how can anyone read that wall of text without yellow highlights and bolded title fonts scattered randomly throughout ?

  3. #78
    Thailand Expat tomcat's Avatar
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    ...Bloomberg is reporting that the Indians have urgently requested anti-aircraft missile systems from the Russians...

  4. #79
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    All ths love while China invades India, killed 20 soldiers and is behaving like a spoiled bully, picking lots offigths everywhere

    Oh yes - friends

  5. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    requested anti-aircraft missile systems from the Russians
    India buys weapons from many countries. It also has developed and manufactures some weapons, with/under licence from Russia.

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    China invades India
    According to India, it's leader, nobody invaded Indian territory. Which source are you quoting?

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    behaving like a spoiled bully
    Where, when or how is this occurring? One or two examples or links are sufficient.

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    picking lots offigths everywhere
    Where or how is this occurring? One or two examples or links are sufficient.

    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    friends
    How would you suggest countries show "friendship" to another country?
    Last edited by OhOh; 24-06-2020 at 08:44 AM.

  6. #81
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    How would you suggest countries show "friendship" to another country?
    Not like that, which is obvious to everyone bar you

  7. #82
    Thailand Expat jabir's Avatar
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    China is the enemy that one needs to keep very close, on the off-chance of occasionally figuring out what they're up to, and taking suitable measures.

  8. #83
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Ah, the old chinky standard, a bit of cyber-retaliation.

    A top police official in Maharashtra informed on Tuesday that hackers based in China attempted over 40,000 cyber attacks on India's Information Technology infrastructure and banking sector in the last five days. Maharashtra police's cyber wing collected information about the hacking attempts and found out that most of them originated from Chengdu area in China.
    "According to our information at least 40,300 cyber attacks were attempted in the last four-five days on the resources in Indian cyberspace," PTI qouted Yashasvi Yadav, Special Inspector General of Police of the Maharashtra Police's cyber wing, as saying.
    40,000 cyber-attacks attempted by Chinese hackers on Indian banking, IT sector in five days

  9. #84
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    India-China border: Satellite images show buildup at site of deadly clash

    China appears to have rebuilt and expanded a military camp in the Himalayas that was the site of a deadly border clash with India, satellite images show.

    The images, from the US satellite operator Maxar Technologies, were taken Monday, a week after what has been described as hand-to-hand fighting with sticks and clubs left at least 20 Indian troops dead.




    China has not given any casualty numbers from the clash in a river valley along the Line of Actual Control (LAC), the ill-defined and disputed border between the two powers high in the Himalayan mountains.


    Beijing says the deadly clash began when Indian troops crossed into Chinese-controlled territory and tried to dismantle a tent camp erected by Chinese forces in the Galwan Valley at what is known as Patrol Point 14.


    The new satellite images appear to show a large expansion of the Chinese encampment on the banks of a river since the fighting on the night of June 15.

    PICS India-China border: Satellite images show buildup at site of deadly clash

  10. #85
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    I wonder where HooHoo is.

    I hope he is not stricken with the Wuhan Virus, he would be dripping with sweat *and* irony.

  11. #86
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    India Urged to Rethink Its Policy on Tibet After Deadly Border Violence

    Recent deadly clashes between Indian and Chinese forces along the unmarked border between the two countries are prompting calls for India to rethink its policy toward Tibet, which before its conquest by China had historically served as a buffer between the two larger powers.


    India must now “be bolder” in considering its policy regarding questions on Tibet, deputy speaker of Tibet’s India-based exile parliament Yeshi Phuntsok told RFA’s Tibetan Service in an interview last week.


    “Until the Tibet issue is resolved, the present simmering Himalayan border conflict between the Chinese and Indian troops will remain. Therefore, finding a peaceful solution to the problem of Tibet is key to India’s security,” Phuntsok said.


    “We are asking the Indian government to help resolve these issues by supporting resumed dialogue between the Dalai Lama’s representatives and the Chinese leadership on the basis of the Middle Way Approach,” Phuntsok said.


    The Middle Way refers to the proposal of the Dalai Lama, who fled to India after an abortive Tibetan uprising against Chinese control in 1959, to recognize Beijing’s rule over Tibet in exchange for a greater autonomy in Tibetan areas.


    Five Tibetan NGOs including the Tibetan Youth Congress (TYC) and Students for a Free Tibet, however, met in India on June 18 to condemn what they called China’s aggression on the border and to call instead for Indian support for Tibet’s return to its former independence.


    “It is high time for India to recognize Tibet as an independent country and an occupied nation,” TYC president Gonpo Dhundup said, according to a June 18 report in the Hindustan Times.


    “An independent Tibet is the only solution to the Indo-China conflict,” added the national director for Students for a Free Tibet, quoted in the Times.


    A clash between Indian and Chinese security forces in the Galwan Valley in northwestern India’s mountainous region of Ladakh in June left dozens of soldiers dead on both sides, many of them beaten to death with clubs, marking the first fatalities in a confrontation between the two militaries in more than four decades.


    Each side blamed the other for the clash, with both India and China saying that troops from the other side had crossed into their territory. Corps-level talks continued on Monday, The Times of India reported.


    Indian views of China harden


    In India, views toward China have hardened, with growing grassroots calls for a boycott of goods from the country’s second largest trade partner.




    The Indian government has banned 59 apps developed by Chinese firms – including, Tik Tok, WeChat and Weibo – citing concerns that they were engaging in activities that are “prejudicial to sovereignty and integrity of India, defence of India, and security of state and public order,” the Press Information Bureau said Monday.


    The current face-off in Ladakh is only the latest in a series of flare-ups along China’s and India’s 2,200-mile-long undemarcated border, or Line of Actual Control, with Indian soldiers on May 9 using their fists to block an attempt by Chinese troops to cross into Indian territory at the Nakula pass in northern Sikkim.


    In June 2017, India sent hundreds of troops into Bhutan to defend its ally against efforts by China to build a road southward into Doklam, an area claimed by both China and Bhutan. The stand-off continued for over two months and ended when both sides withdrew.


    China and India, now both nuclear-armed powers, fought a border war in 1962 that left hundreds killed or wounded on both sides.


    After gaining independence from Britain in 1947, India had never bothered to consolidate its northern border, because Tibet was “a friendly, peaceful, and culturally linked country,” Indian defense analyst and retired general PG Kamath told RFA’s Tibetan Service.


    This was shown to have been a strategic mistake after China invaded and occupied Tibet in 1950, bringing Chinese troops up to the still undemarcated border with India, he said.


    India then helped China by recognizing its occupation of Tibet as legitimate, said retired general and former director of Indian military training Vinod Saighal.


    “If India had not recognized China’s occupation of Tibet, no one else in the world would have done so,” Saighal said, adding that India may soon “change course” in its view of China’s presence in Tibet.


    “China has overplayed its cards this time,” he said.


    Can policy change?


    China is an expansionist power, “which is obviously not to the liking of the government of India and the people of India,” added retired general and former director of India’s Center for Land Warfare Studies Dhruv C. Katoch.


    “But I don’t think that any [Indian] political party will change the status quo on Tibet. I think what’s important nowadays is that there is support for the Tibetan people, and their cause is increasing among the Indian public,” he said.


    Indian government policy toward Tibet may be difficult to change, agreed Tenzin Lekshay, deputy director of the Dharamsala, India-based Tibet Policy Institute.


    “But Tibetans should take the opportunity to make the Indian public more aware of the situation in Tibet. I think that creating awareness of the Tibetan issue will also help us in our cause,” Lekshay told RFA.


    India, home to 85,000 refugees from Tibet, has given mixed signals to Tibetans over the years as it courts China as an economic partner.


    In 2018, on the eve of a meeting between Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping, the Indian government issued a directive prohibiting bureaucrats and leaders from attending events organized by the Central Tibetan Authority (CTA) marking 60 years in India in 2019.


    Lobsang Sangay—president of the CTA, the India-based Tibetan exile government—called on China this month to withdraw its forces from Tibet and allow the formerly independent Himalayan country to resume its historic role as a buffer state.


    “When Tibet was independent, the Indian army did not require a defense budget of 60 billion dollars. It was not necessary at all,” Sangay said in an interview with India Today.


    “So, once Tibet is demilitarized and declared a zone of peace, the two largest populated countries in the world, India and China, will have permanent peace.”


    China, which has occupied Tibet for over 70 years, is unlikely now to pull its forces back from the border with its rival India, though, many believe.


    Only a restoration of Tibet’s independence will fully address the question of Tibet’s status and help promote peace along the border, Tibetan activist Tenzin Tsundue said to RFA in a recent interview.


    “The Tibetan people’s demand for independence is not just because we don’t trust [Chinese president] Xi Jinping and his machinery of control,” Tsundue said, “but because we believe only the restoration of Tibet’s independence can truly guarantee the survival of Tibet’s religion, culture, land, and people.”


    “We can respect China only as our neighbor, not as our boss,” Tsundue said.


    India Urged to Rethink Its Policy on Tibet After Deadly Border Violence

  12. #87
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    India must now “be bolder” in considering its policy regarding questions on Tibet, deputy speaker of Tibet’s India-based exile parliament Yeshi Phuntsok told RFA’s Tibetan Service in an interview last week.
    Yup, showing weakness to China is a big mistake

  13. #88
    Thailand Expat TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    India then helped China by recognizing its occupation of Tibet as legitimate, said retired general and former director of Indian military training Vinod Saighal.


    “If India had not recognized China’s occupation of Tibet, no one else in the world would have done so,” Saighal said, adding that India may soon “change course” in its view of China’s presence in Tibet.
    I didn't know that.

  14. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    “If India had not recognized China’s occupation of Tibet, no one else in the world would have done so,” Saighal said, adding that India may soon “change course” in its view of China’s presence in Tibet.
    A guess could be that the somewhat progressive top in India, at the time of the invasion, were aware of the state of things in Tibet at that time.

    A such feudal hell hole, that an invasion, would look like a liberation.

    That is how I heard it. And could be atleast half right


    Btw: All of you 'wokefolks'.

    When do we take on India, with it's disgusting apartheid and caste system ?

    Doesn't appeal that much ?. China taking up too much space being assholes right now ?

    India appears civilized due to Cricket ?


    Next month ? Just knock; i'm in

  15. #90
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helge View Post
    That is how I heard it. And could be atleast half right
    Yup, it was poooooooor . . . but subjugating an entire people, populating the region with Han Chinese, sterilisation of the locals etc....

    Yea, rather be poor



    Quote Originally Posted by helge View Post
    When do we take on India, with it's disgusting apartheid and caste system ?
    A few differences, aren't there . . . it's a free society, a democracy so people can be voted in and out, they don't place minorities in concentration camps by the millions, they're not out to dominate the world or even the region . . .

    Faults? Sure? Better than China? Absolutely

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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Yea, rather be poor
    Yeah, I'm not sure you understand what kind of "poor".
    Hard choice
    for sure
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    it's a free society
    Are you speaking now as a low or high caste PH ?

    And you can't vote to make your caste by birth go away
    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Better than China? Absolutely
    Easy for us to say

    Have you ever tasted humiliation or hunger ?

  17. #92
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by helge View Post
    Are you speaking now as a low or high caste PH ?

    And you can't vote to make your caste by birth go away
    Neither, I'm talking about universal suffrage in India, the opportunity to elect a direct representative for your area, state, federal - things you can't do in China.
    The caste system was legally abolished . . . and anti-discrimination laws enacted . . . they kind of work in the cities



    Quote Originally Posted by helge View Post
    Easy for us to say
    Have you ever tasted humiliation or hunger ?
    I'd rather be hungry than see my family thrown in jail or killed, my mother force-sterilised, monks killed and not being allowed to learn my history, culture, language etc...

    Limits, I'd say

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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    Limits, I'd say
    I'm afraid that you do not quite get my point.

    My fault

    Get back to you later

  19. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by helge View Post
    I'm afraid that you do not quite get my point.
    Sorry, I'm possibly being a bit slow in understanding

  20. #95
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    No, my fault

    Gotta run

  21. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by panama hat View Post
    the opportunity to elect a direct representative for your area, state, federal - things you can't do in China.
    Very similar but different.

    Elections in China

    "Elections in China are based on a hierarchical electoral system, whereby local People's Congresses are directly elected, and all higher levels of People's Congresses up to the National People's Congress (NPC), the national legislature, are indirectly elected by the People's Congress of the level immediately below.[1]

    The NPC Standing Committee may partially alter laws passed by the NPC when the NPC is not in session, which is significant since the Standing Committee meets more frequently than the NPC.[2]

    Governors, mayors, and heads of counties, districts, townships and towns are in turn elected by the respective local People's Congresses.[3]

    Presidents of people's courts and chief procurators of people's procuratorates are elected by the respective local People's Congresses above the county level.[3]

    The President and the State Council are elected by the National People's Congress, which is made of 2980 people"

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elections_in_China

    Elections in the United Kingdom:

    Candidates for parliamentary seats are selected by their own local party committees, Cons, Labs, Libs ...... who themselves are elected by the local party members Cons, Labs, Libs ....... Not by the constituents citizens.

    The parliamentary vote, by the local citizens, who are thus restricted to a party member of each Cons, Labs, Libs .......

    If one party wins a majority of local elections it becomes the Government. Positions within the Government are handed out by the Party committee.

    If one party does not win a majority of local elections it endeavours to convince other locally elected candidates, from different parties, to join them and if successful becomes the Government. Positions within the Government are handed out by the Parties committees.

    If the majority winner is unable to win over a sufficient number, other parties can try similarly to to obtain a Parliamentary majority, by similar methods, to ensure the passage of their manifesto "promises".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electi...United_Kingdom

    I suspect ex-empire countries are similar.

    The USA has it's own system which I can't comment on, with any accuracy.

  22. #97
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    The only people with power in Chinastan are people put there by the party.

    There is no opposition and no democracy, no matter how hard Hoohoo squeals that there is.

    Bit like their so-called "judicial" system.

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    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    Elections in China

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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    are people put there by the party.
    Quote Originally Posted by OhOh View Post
    local People's Congresses are directly elected,

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    There is no opposition
    One presumes the "local people's congresses" are made up of the candidates who are voted for by Chinese citizens. Democratically elected.

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    ike their so-called "judicial" system.
    " Most trials are administered by a collegial bench made up of one to three judges and three to five assessors.

    Assessors, according to the State Constitution, are elected by local residents or people's congresses from among citizens over twenty-three years of age with political rights or are appointed by the court for their
    expertise

    Judicial system of China - Wikipedia

    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    democracy,
    "1. the belief in freedom and equality between people,

    2. a
    system of government based on this belief, in which power is either held by elected representatives or directly by the people themselves: "


    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dic...lish/democracy

  25. #100
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    a system of government based on this belief, in which power is either held by elected representatives or directly by the people themselves: "
    Which clearly isn't the case in Chinastan where Mr. Shithole runs the show.

    Next think you'll be telling us Vlad and Hun Sen are "elected by the people".


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