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  1. #1
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    China Moves to Take Over Direct Political Control of Hong Kong

    The ruling Chinese Communist Party has ushered in an era of more direct political control over Hong Kong, with a cabinet reshuffle and a slew of statements targeting pro-democracy figures in recent days.


    The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office (HKMAO) of China's cabinet, the State Council, has made an unprecedented string of public statements reasserting China's rule over the city, which was promised a "high degree of autonomy" following the 1997 handover.


    "Hong Kong is China’s Hong Kong," the office said in a statement on its website.


    "People in the opposition camp and some radicals accuse the central government of interfering in Hong Kong’s high [degree of] autonomy, but ignore or even invite ... interference by foreign forces in enforcement actions by the police and the Department of Justice," the statement said.


    The HKMAO also threw its support behind the recent arrests of pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai, Democratic Party founder Martin Lee, and constitutional expert Margaret Ng, who were among 15 pro-democracy figures charged with "illegal assembly" at the weekend.


    "This is a normal law enforcement action to safeguard the rule of law, order and social justice in Hong Kong. We firmly support [it]," a spokesperson for the office said.


    It accused foreign governments of trying to glorify "illegal assemblies" and the subsequent "violent actions" that followed.


    "We resolutely oppose any external forces to interfere in Hong Kong affairs and (we will) unswervingly safeguard national sovereignty, security, development interests and Hong Kong's long-term prosperity and stability," they said.


    The spokesperson also took aim at pro-democracy lawmaker Dennis Kwok, saying he had deliberately violated his oath of allegiance and committed "misconduct in public office" by using filibuster tactics at a recent debate in Hong Kong's Legislative Council (LegCo).




    Dubious exemption clam


    Kwok had been trying to obstruct the passing of the National Anthem Law, which would outlaw any disrespect to the March of the Volunteers, the anthem of the People's Republic of China. The bill was introduced after Hong Kong soccer fans repeatedly booed the anthem at the start of matches.


    “The attempts by people like Civic Party lawmaker Dennis Kwok to paralyse the LegCo have directly hindered the effective operation of Hong Kong’s political system, the constitution and the constitutional order of the special administrative region," the HKMAO said.


    "How is it possible that the central government should just sit and ignore such a serious incident?" it said in a fresh statement on Tuesday.


    Last week, the HKMAO claimed that China's Central Liaison Office in Hong Kong is exempt from Article 22 of the city's mini-constitution, the Basic Law, which states that departments of the Chinese government must not interfere in the day-to-day running of of the city.


    "It absolutely has the power and responsibilities to supervise the correct implementation of the one country, two systems principle and the Basic Law in Hong Kong," a HKMAO spokesman said.


    Kwok responded that "the writing is on the wall" for him as a lawmaker, but called on the people of Hong Kong never to give up the fight for freedom and democracy.


    "The Central People's Government are now exercising their so-called 'comprehensive jurisdiction' over every aspect of Hong Kong domestic affairs," Kwok said.


    He said Hong Kong is now seeing the "complete demolition" of its promised autonomy, under the "one country, two systems" principle.


    "As for myself, their intention of disqualifying me as a Legislative Council member is very clear," Kwok said. "The writing is on the wall."


    After he spoke, pro-democracy lawmakers chanted "Go Hong Kong people!"




    'All-out offensive' against democrats


    Hong Kong current affairs commentator Liu Ruishao said Beijing sees the coronavirus pandemic as a good time to assert its power in Hong Kong, as well as to launch an all-out political attack on pro-democracy lawmakers, high profile figures, and their supporters.


    "Beijing will be demonstrating its total control in a number of ways," Liu said. "[The ruling Chinese Communist Party] has lost patience with one country, two systems, and it is accelerating all of its moves."


    "They are going on an all-out offensive in the hope of slashing away at the mess [democrats]," Liu said. "We can't rule out the suspension of uncooperative lawmakers during the current LegCo; they won't necessarily wait until the September elections."


    The HKMAO's new assertiveness comes amid a major cabinet reshuffle in the administration of chief executive Carrie Lam, with Constitutional and Mainland Affairs Secretary Patrick Nip to take over as head of the Civil Service Bureau, government broadcaster RTHK reported.


    RTHK understands that the current civil service chief Joshua Law will leave government, along with Home Affairs Secretary Lau Kong wah, Innovation and Technology Secretary Nicholas Young and James Lau - the Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury, the station said, citing government sources.


    RTHK said Nip would likely be replaced by Immigration Director Erick Tsang.


    The reshuffle comes after Nip was embroiled in the row over whether or not the ban on interference by Chinese departments included China's Central Liaison Office and the HKMAO.


    The government had at first seemed to disagree with the liaison office which insisted last week that it is not subject to Basic Law Article 22, RTHK reported. But by the third statement, it had decided the liaison office was indeed correct, the station said.


    The Hong Kong government's position is now that the liaison office has "supervisory powers" over Hong Kong. Lam later said "some officials" may not have understood the Basic Law, in a possible reference to earlier statements by Nip.


    On Nov. 27, 2019, U.S. President Donald Trump signed into law the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, requiring the State Department to report annually to Congress whether Hong Kong is “sufficiently autonomous from China” to justify keeping the city’s distinct trading status, and whether China has “eroded Hong Kong’s civil liberties and rule of law,” as protected by the city’s Basic Law.


    It also enables the U.S. government to freeze the assets of, and refuse visas to, officials deemed responsible for human rights violations in the city.


    Tens of thousands of people poured onto the streets of Hong Kong, waving American flags and singing the national anthem of the United States in a gesture of thanks after the law was passed.

    China Moves to Take Over Direct Political Control of Hong Kong

  2. #2
    ความรู้ลึกลับ HuangLao's Avatar
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    Hong Kongers shooting themselves in the foot.

    Bye-bye somewhat hands off autonomous status.

  3. #3
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    No surprise that the chinkies are taking advantage of a crisis really.

  4. #4
    [at][at][at][at][at][at] SKkin's Avatar
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    Hmmm....Mike Pompeo corporate board member of RFA

    Governance and Corporate Leadership

    RFA - Washington DC USA

    Sources sources...


  5. #5
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    Hmmm....Mike Pompeo corporate board member of RFA

    Governance and Corporate Leadership

    RFA - Washington DC USA

    Sources sources...

    Would you believe the statements if they came from a more pro-chinky website?

    Here you are then.

    HKMAO issues multiple new statements on HK

  6. #6
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    Hmmm....Mike Pompeo corporate board member of RFA
    Mike Pompeo “ex offico board” board member. He is Secretary of State therefore on the board.

    Quote Originally Posted by SKkin View Post
    Sources sources...
    This is a NEWS thread. RFA is a NEWS source. RT is a NEWS source. China Daily and Hong Kong News are also NEWS sources. Post your fill.

    (As stated in TD’s rules, blogs are not news and never will be.)

  7. #7
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    Absolutely sick that CCP, the rumors are true

  8. #8
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    well, how is that a fooking surprise? HK people were too happy to welcome China and be abused socially and economically by the big HK families

    now they get to pay for the price of what was a "failed experiment" in the long run,

  9. #9
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misskit View Post
    RT is a NEWS source.
    Don't be fucking silly misskit.


  10. #10
    Thailand Expat misskit's Avatar
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    China Confirms Hong Kong Reshuffle in High-Profile Announcement

    (L-R) Hong Kong Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury Christopher Hui Ching-yu, Secretary for Innovation and Technology Alfred Sit Wing-hang, Secretary for civil service Patrick Nip Tak-kuen, Chief Executive Carrie Lam, China on Wednesday confirmed reports of a reshuffle of several key officials in Hong Kong, following reports that the ruling Chinese Communist Party is taking a more direct role in the running of the once-autonomous city.


    China's State Council announced the removal of constitutional and mainland affairs secretary Patrick Nip, whose responses last week to questions over the role of China's Liaison Office in Hong Kong were later "corrected" by his boss, chief executive Carrie Lam.


    Nip was instead appointed secretary for the civil service, while hardliner Erick Tsang took over from him.


    Lam told a news conference that the reshuffle had nothing to do with last week's controversy, during which China asserted that its liaison office isn't subject to a ban on interference by its departments in Hong Kong's internal affairs, but instead is authorized to play a "supervisory role" in the day-to-day running of the city.


    University of Hong Kong social science lecturer Ken Yau said the central government is sending a signal with this reshuffle that the city's senior officials need to take the views of Beijing's Central Liaison Office into account when making decisions, or they too could face similar consequences.


    He said the appointment of Chris Hui as secretary for financial services and the treasury, replacing colonial-era veteran James Henry Lau, also showed the growing politicization of the Hong Kong government with hard-line pro-China officials.


    The announcement came amid fears that the authorities would withhold approval for an annual vigil in Victoria Park commemorating the victims of the 1989 Tiananmen massacre, for the first time in 31 years.


    Coronavirus restrictions


    The Ming Pao newspaper quoted police on Wednesday as saying that approval for public gatherings would depend on the coronavirus situation, and whether current restrictions on public gatherings remain in place.


    It said police were unlikely to approve an application for an International Workers' Day march on May 1, and hadn't even considered an application for the annual July 1 protest march yet.


    Staff said the football pitches and grassy areas where people usually gather for the June 4 candlelight vigil are currently closed, with no indication of when they will reopen.


    Secretary for Security John Lee said the matter would be decided by police based on current legislation.


    Vigil organizer Lee Cheuk-yan said his Alliance in Support of the Democratic Patriotic Movement in China had applied for a permit, but have had no response.


    "The government should not use the epidemic to suppress the freedom of assembly," Lee said. "On what basis will they be preventing the vigil? Does the Chinese Communist Party want to silence all of Hong Kong's voices?"


    'The Chinese Communist Party is clamping down now'


    Last year's 30th anniversary saw 180,000 people crowd into Victoria Park for the vigil, with many in Hong Kong still remembering the pain and horror when news of the massacre was blazoned across their TV screens.


    On May 21, 1989, around 1.5 million Hongkongers had turned out in a peaceful rally supporting the student-led democracy movement in mainland China.


    "We know that things are going to get more and more difficult in the future, because the Chinese Communist Party is clamping down now," Lee told RFA. "Hong Kong's prospects are looking more and more gloomy: we are basically becoming part of the same system through China's interventions."


    "We will continue to support freedom of assembly for the people of Hong Kong, and continue to mourn the June 4, 1989 massacre," he said.


    Current affairs commentator Liu Ruishao said the event could wind up being scattered across Hong Kong, much in the same way that the protest movement last year broke up into smaller events across all of the city's districts.


    "Surely it will be possible to mark June 4 without a fixed location, in some appropriate and yet legal manner?" Liu said. "The event could be spread across the whole of Hong Kong."


    "People shouldn't be intimidated by the big bad authority [of China]; instead we should allow even greater popular wisdom to emerge as a result of this official pressure," he said.


    Beijing has ushered in an era of more direct political control over Hong Kong, with the cabinet reshuffle and a slew of statements targeting pro-democracy figures in recent days.


    The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office (HKMAO) of China's cabinet, the State Council, has made an unprecedented string of public statements reasserting China's rule over the city, which was promised a "high degree of autonomy" following the 1997 handover.


    "Hong Kong is China’s Hong Kong," the office said in a statement on its website.


    "People in the opposition camp and some radicals accuse the central government of interfering in Hong Kong’s high [degree of] autonomy, but ignore or even invite ... interference by foreign forces in enforcement actions by the police and the Department of Justice," the statement said.


    The HKMAO also threw its support behind the recent arrests of pro-democracy media tycoon Jimmy Lai, Democratic Party founder Martin Lee, and constitutional expert Margaret Ng, who were among 15 pro-democracy figures charged with "illegal assembly" at the weekend.


    Police on Wednesday said they had charged two teenagers with the murder of 70-year-old cleaner Luo Changqing, who was hit on the head with a brick during a clash between protesters and other residents outside Sheung Shui MTR station on Nov. 13, 2019.

    China Confirms Hong Kong Reshuffle in High-Profile Announcement

  11. #11
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    So I'd be interested to hear Skkin tell us where the OP was wrong.

  12. #12
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    China’s proposed new legislation for Hong Kong requires the territory to quickly finish enacting national security regulations under its mini-constitution, the Basic law, according to a draft of the legislation seen by Reuters.


    China’s parliamentary vice chairman, Wang Chen, was scheduled to give a speech explaining the new law later on Friday.


    According to the legislation, China’s parliament empowers itself to set up the legal framework and implementation mechanism to prevent and punish subversion, terrorism, separatism and foreign interference, “or any acts that severely endanger national security”.


    Coronavirus live news: China abandons GDP target for first time due to 'great uncertainty' | World news | The Guardian

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    Don't be fucking silly misskit.

    You can add China daily to the BS 'news' source list.
    Run by the propoganda dept. of the CCP.


    China plans to push through sweeping national security laws for Hong Kong at its annual meeting of parliament, in a move that critics say will effectively end the territory’s autonomy.

    Beijing has been making it clear it wants new security legislation passed since huge pro-democracy protests last year plunged Hong Kong into its deepest turmoil since it returned to Chinese rule in 1997.


    “National security is the bedrock underpinning the stability of the country,” said Zhang Yesui, spokesman for the National People’s Congress (NPC), the annual meeting of parliament that kicks off its full session on Friday.


    Zhang announced that delegates at the NPC – a largely rubber-stamping exercise – would “establish and improve a legal framework and mechanism for safeguarding national security” in Hong Kong.




    Condemnation of the proposal was swift, amid fears it could erase the “one country, two systems” framework that is supposed to grant the territory a high degree of autonomy.


    “This is the end of Hong Kong,” said pro-democracy Hong Kong legislator Dennis Kwok. “Beijing, the Central People’s Government, has completely breached its promise to the Hong Kong people ... They are completely walking back on their obligation.”


    Article 23 of Hong Kong’s mini-constitution, the Basic Law, says the city must enact national security laws to prohibit “treason, secession, sedition [and] subversion” against the Chinese government.


    But the clause has never been implemented due to deeply held public fears it would curtail Hong Kong’s cherished rights, such as freedom of expression. An attempt to enact article 23 in 2003 was shelved after half a million people took to the streets in protest.


    By passing a law in the NPC, Chinese authorities will effectively bypass local opposition.


    Zhang said details of the proposal would be announced at NPC proceedings on Friday. The resolution is likely to be passed by China’s parliament next week.


    The US president Donald Trump, who has ratcheted up his anti-China rhetoric as he seeks re-election in November, told reporters at the White House that “nobody knows yet” the details of China’s plan. “If it happens we’ll address that issue very strongly,” Trump said, without elaborating.


    US State Department spokeswoman Morgan Ortagus warned that imposing such a law would be “highly destabilising, and would be met with strong condemnation from the United States and the international community”.


    China’s announcement came as anti-government protests that have overwhelmed Hong Kong since last June approach their one-year anniversary. In recent months the protests have been paused as a result of the coronavirus pandemic and much of the world has been distracted. In the meantime Beijing has appeared more determined to definitively quell the demonstrations.


    Critics say the measure severely undermines Hong Kong’s legal framework, established under the terms of the former British colony’s handover to Chinese control in 1997. Chris Patten, the last British governor of Hong Kong, described it as a “comprehensive assault on the city’s autonomy”.


    Under its Basic Law, Hong Kong is meant to enact security legislation on its own. “This spells the beginning of the end of Hong Kong under ‘one country, two systems’,” said Kenneth Chan, a political scientist at the Baptist University of Hong Kong.


    “It would mean also communist-style political struggles have trumped the rule of law and a dagger that has stabbed into the heart of the city’s liberal foundations,” he said.


    “This is an expedient way to control Hong Kong,” said Johnny Lau, veteran China watcher and former journalist at the pro-China Wen Wei Po.


    Legal observers and human rights advocates worry the law will be used to target critics of the central government. Over the last year, Hong Kong and Chinese authorities have often described demonstrators as terrorists.


    “The obvious worry is that in China, we have seen ‘national security’, as well as related concepts like ‘counter-terrorism’, being used as an excuse for all sorts of human rights abuses, including the arbitrary arrest and imprisonment of dissidents, activists and human rights lawyers,” said Wilson Leung, a Hong Kong barrister who is part of the Progressive Lawyers Group.


    According to legal experts, Chinese lawmakers may be able to enforce the law in Hong Kong through a provision, article 18, of the Basic Law that allows certain national laws in mainland China to be applied in Hong Kong, either through declaration or local legislation.


    Martin Lee, the founder of the Democratic Party and a senior barrister who helped draft the Basic Law, said he insisted on the language in the document that “Hong Kong shall legislate on its own” national security laws.


    “This is a blatant breach of their promise, they have reversed things completely,” he said. “This is the wrong procedure.”


    He said the article 18 provision should apply to national laws only, not laws that specifically relate to Hong Kong. “If this precedent is set, then there is no need for [Hong Kong’s] legislative council,” he said.


    Eric Cheung, the director of clinical legal education of the faculty of law at the University of Hong Kong, said: “The problem here is that if they want to do it, of course they can do it in any way they want to. The reality is that we are powerless.”


    As China’s most important political event opens this week, after almost three months of delay, there are other signs of measures to stop the protests in Hong Kong. At the opening of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference on Thursday, Wang Yang, the head of the political advisory body, said the party supported strengthening the ability of its members in Hong Kong to “speak out, stop chaos, and reinstate order”.


    Still, demonstrators, who have begun to take to the streets again, appeared more determined to pursue their demands.


    “At this time last year, didn’t we believe that the extradition law was sure to pass? Hong Kongers have always created miracles,” Nathan Law, a pro-democracy activist, wrote on Facebook.


    “People will continue to protest on streets,” tweeted Joshua Wong, an activist and former student leader during the 2014 protest movement. “Hong Kongers will not be scared off.”
    'This is the end of Hong Kong': China pushes controversial security laws | World news | The Guardian
    Last edited by Cujo; 22-05-2020 at 11:04 AM.

  14. #14
    Cenosillicaphobiac
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    So I'd be interested to hear Skkin tell us where the OP was wrong.

    He can barely tell time, don't hold your breath waiting for him to tell us what was wrong.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by HuangLao View Post
    Hong Kongers shooting themselves in the foot.

    Bye-bye somewhat hands off autonomous status.
    As I wrote before the China Imperium will hardly be bothered by some MickeyMouse problems in HK, Taiwan, Tibet etc.

    Similarly, as the UK Imperium had been bothered by problems in NI?

    BTW, there are bygone the times when a huge business of China went through HK, now it is just a small portion of it.

    And for the young people it's increasingly more difficult to get there an affordable bed for overnight, not speaking about families...

  16. #16
    Hansum Man! panama hat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Klondyke View Post
    As I wrote before the China Imperium will hardly be bothered by some MickeyMouse problems in HK, Taiwan, Tibet etc.
    So why are they expending so much energy on doing exactly that . . .

  17. #17
    Hangin' Around cyrille's Avatar
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    ^One can only hope the money's good.

  18. #18
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    This comes as no surprise.

  19. #19
    Thailand Expat harrybarracuda's Avatar
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    It was going to happen eventually anyway, but it's no surprise that the slimy chinkies are taking advantage of the world's preoccupation with the Billy Ray Cyrus to breach the agreement.

    This law will allow them to send in the goon squads and spirit away anyone who dares to mention the word "democracy", either for a bit of Uighur-style "re-education" or a one-way trip to a pig feed factory.

  20. #20
    Thailand Expat TheRealKW's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrybarracuda View Post
    It was going to happen eventually anyway, but it's no surprise that the slimy chinkies are taking advantage
    Why is that a surprise?

  21. #21
    Days Work Done! Norton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sabang View Post
    This comes as no surprise.
    Indeed. No doubt China's long term strategy is to bring all of East Asia under it's ecomic control but I think they are making a big mistake pushing the HK and Taiwan issues atm.

    Likely they will lose more than they gain when US, Euros and others push back and form a massive economic trading block which is currently fractured. China cannot economically withstand a united worldwide trade block.
    Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Norton View Post
    Likely they will lose more than they gain when US, Euros and others push back and form a massive economic trading block which is currently fractured. China cannot economically withstand a united worldwide trade block.
    ...imo, never going to happen: the world is too fractured and, in many cases, too easily bought to form a united front against...anything. China may overplay its hand with land (and sea) grabs, but it knows how to soothe (and enrich) potential international dissenters...eventually, China will claim it wants to protect Chinese minorities in SEA and create an (even more solidified) sphere of influence in the region...and another communist empire is born...
    Majestically enthroned amid the vulgar herd

  23. #23
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    China, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, Cambodia.............they all use the "national security" excuse to do just about anything they want.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Latindancer View Post
    China, the US, Australia, Russia, Britain, Everybody Else.............they all use the "national security" excuse to do just about anything they want.
    ...ftfy...

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomcat View Post
    ...imo, never going to happen: the world is too fractured and, in many cases, too easily bought to form a united front against...anything. China may overplay its hand with land (and sea) grabs, but it knows how to soothe (and enrich) potential international dissenters...eventually, China will claim it wants to protect Chinese minorities in SEA and create an (even more solidified) sphere of influence in the region...and another communist empire is born...
    Yep. Most of the world handed over their production bases to China and S.E. Asia a long time ago already. The supposed "trade war" is a joke.

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